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SPECIAL ARTICLE.

'-NOTES AND COMMENTS.

HAVERFORDWEST. -

DUNCLEDDY PETTY SESSIONS.

LIST OF CANDIDATES.

HAVERFORDWEST.

CAMROSE.

COUNTY COUNCIL ELECTION.

ETHOLlAD CYNCOR SIROL.

A CONTRACTOR'S AFFAIRS-

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----_------_-----THE KING'S…

PREMIER AND THE LORDS.

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PREMIER AND THE LORDS. The Address in reply to the Speech was moved in the House of Commons by Mr. Tom- kinson, and seconded by Dr. Rainy. The debate which followed was chiefly interesting for the references made by the Leader of the Opposi- tion and the Prime Minister to the sub- ject of the differences between the two Chambers, remarked upon in the King's Speech. Mr. Balfour, in his speech, remarked I have no objection to the Government reflect- ing upon the situation. In fact, it would be better if they would think more and talk rather less upon this great constitutional issue. Mr. Gladstone advocates the policy known as "fill- ing up the cup." But the question is, "Whose cup? My private belief is that the cup which will overflow first is the cup of the unpopularity of the Government. Another member of the Government let the public into his confidence. He looked forward to a series of dissolutions ending in a revolution before the constitutional issue is ready to be settled. I confess this comei upon me rather as a shock. I never supposed that in Sir J. Lawson Walton there was a Robespierre in disguise. If your object is to make the Second Chamber the impeccable body which some theorists desire, the only effect will be that you will strengthen it. The inevitable result will be that in the collisions that must occur in every bi-cameral constitution, this House will find itself at a disadvantage. Sir H. Campbell-Bannerman, in his reply, ex- plained what the Government really meant by the reference in the Speech. I fully recognise, he said, the serious nature of the task to which we shall in due time invite this House to address itself. We wish to raise the question of the re- lations between the two Houses, and not the question of the constitution of the other House., which is another matter altogether. Two months ago two great measures were destroyed by the House of Lords. Those measures had been demanded by the country, and elaborated with infinite pains in this House. The House of Lords is sometimes thought of as a kind of watch dog guarding the Statute Book. A period of prolonged somnolence of this v.ateh dog has been succeeded by a sudden access of bitter ferocity. The combination of the two-one coming after the other-is surely perfectly in- tolerable, and shows that there is some fatal vice in the working of the constitution. I am not sure I would not rather have a Constitution where the representative body was very much at the disposal or under the control of the Sove- reign himself directly, than a Constitution which was equally under the control of another Chamber. The Government does not shrink from this problem. The present state of things is discreditable; it is dangerous and demoralis- ing to this House. It cannot go on. We must have such a readjustment of the relations of the two Houses as will enable us to carry out with reasonable harmony the wishes of the people. What we are concerned with is the relation of the House of Commons to the other Chamber, however the latter may be composed. It is to this point that in due time the attention of the House will be directed. In the House of Lords the Address was moved by Lord Castletown and seconded by the Earl of Chichester. The latter when discussing the proposed legislation, referred to cheap trains, of which there is no mention in the King's Speech, and praised the Government for pro- mising a Bill for cheap trains. At last the Government Whip pulled his coat tails so hard that he leaned to hear, and was informed in stage whispers that the Government had not a cheap trains Bill on hand. The subject of the conflict between the two Houses was taken up by the Marquis of Lans- downe, who remarked When the party oppo- site were appealing to the people at the last general election the authority to deal with the House of Lords did not form any part of the appeal. We threw out two Bills," he con- tinued. "One was the Plural Voting Bill. Who feas bed any tews over the Plural Voting Bill t

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PREMIER AND THE LORDS.