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\AN OLD PEMBROKESHIRE FAMILY.

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AN OLD PEMBROKESHIRE FAMILY. Beatrice, the sister of John. had, as stated in the last paper, married Richard de Barri, and brought him Begelly as her dowry. John de Carew died in 1324, and his son Nicholas dying a few months after- wards-was succeeded by his brother Thomas, o whom the only fact recorded is that when in 1332 he was indicted for tak- ing away from Manorbier the goods of David de Barri during the great la-v-suit, he refused to appear on the ground that the writ against him w.s not sealed with the proper seal. Unhappily, we are not told whether this defence was admitted, ap- parently it was. There were lawyers in Pembroke in 1332. It is not quite clear whether Sir John de Carew. the next lord, wa3 the son of Thomas or his nephew, probably the latter. He was lord deputy o-f Ireland in the reign of Edward III., and had large possessions in Devon which had devolved upon him through the marriages of his ancestors with the heiresses of the Peverels and the Mohuns. He held at Carew in 1348 five kniights' fee worth 100 marks, and among his advowsons, that of St. Bride's taxed at 16 marks. He also held a canonry in the Collegiate Church, of Llandewi Brefi, with the prebend of Dihewid, of the value of 10 marks. Good Bishop Beck had founded this church in 1287 as a place of spiritual joy, with ad- vowsons of Cardigan churches, which Edward I. had coruscated and given to him, but the prebends soon got into lay hands, and were treated as sinecures. Sir John died in 1362, leaving a widow Eliza- beth (apparently his second wife), who had the manor of Lawrenny as part of her dower. His son Leonard survived his father seven years, and died in Gascony in the suit of the Earl of Pembroke, leaving a son Thomas, then aged two years This Thomas lived for what was in those days a ripe old age, and died in 1431. Like his father he was a warrior; in 1416 he was serving in France, and in the next year was ordered by the Privy Council to prose- cute the war at sea. He married Eliza- beth, daughter of Sir John Bonville, a West country family, who held lands in Pembrokeshire and gave their name to Bon- ville's Court. In 1404 the sum of t200 was ordered by the Council to be paid to him for the wages of men at arms to guard the castles of Carmarthen and Emlyn, and his account for the custody of Narberth Castle is extant, showing that he paid £90 Is. lOd. as wages to ten men at arms, and fifty archerJ from the 1st November 1402, to the 24th April, 1404. Nicholas, the son of Thomas, married Joan, daughter and heiress of Sir Hugh Courtenay, of Haccombe, Co. Devon. He died in 1447, leaving four sons, Thomas; Nicholas of Haccombe, the ancestor of the Carew baronets; Alexander of An- thony, from whom came Richard Carew, the antiquary and the family of Po'e- Carew; and William, the ancestor of the present owner of Carew. Notwithstand- ing their vast possessions and their judi- cious marriages the Carews soon after this time fell through improvidence upon evil days, Edmund, the grandson of the last mentioned Thomas. mortgaged Car w Castle to Sir Rhys ap Thomas, who held there the famous Tournament )f St. xe)rge in 1,507 On the attainder i;1- 1531 of Rhys ap Griffith, the grandson and heir of Sir Rhys, who had foreclosed the mort- gage, it was forfeited to the Crown., Ed- mund Carew went to the wars, and was killed in France. He left two sons :— William, the father of Sir Peter Carew (frequently called Carrow in the State papers) who tried to retrieve the fallen fortunes of the house by recovering the ancient possessions of the Carews in Ire- land, which had passed from them for two centuries, and died there in 1575; and George, the father of George, Lord Carew, and Earl of Totaess, who succeeded to his cousin's unlawful heritage. He was a friend and contemporary of George Owen, and was himself a considerable antiquary, as his collection which is now at Lambeth Palace most amply testifies. Carew Castle was granted by Queen Mary to Sir John Perrot, and it is "to him tld to Sir Rhys ap Thomas that we owe much of the beau- tiful buildings whose ruins are so well known to us. After Perrot's attainder, Carew was granted to different persons on different tenures until in the reign of James I. the old family came back. Thomas Carew, the great-grandson of William, the son of Nicholas, had married Elizabeth, the daughter and heiress of Hugh Bic- combe of Crowcombe, in Somerset, and their son, Sir John, was able to buy up cerain outstanding interests and to obtain a grant in fee from the Crown. Sir John Carew died in 1637, and is buried in Carew Church, where his monument may be see, He was Sheriff of Pembrokeshire in 1623. His son George was Sheriff in 1640, and was the last Carew who lived there, for in 1643 the castle, which was held for the king in the Civil Wars, and was even then a place of great strength, was surrendered upon quarter and dismantled. John, the son of George, died without issue, and Carew went to the descendants of his (George's) elder brother, Thomas Carew, of Crowcombe, in whom it remained until Mary Carew in 1794, married George Henry Warrington, who took the name of Carew. His grandson, Colonel Carew, who died in 1874,left a son, who died with- out issue, and a daughter, Ethel Mary Carew, the present owner and the lineal descendant of Gerald Fitz Walter; she mar- ried the Hon. R. C. Trollope. Of the extent of the Carew possessions in the county we can form some idea from the list of the places in which they held lands, given in the inquisitions held on the deaths of Sir John Carew in 1362, and of Sir Nicholas Carew in 1447. In each case it is stated that the barony of Carew was held by the service of five knight's fees of the Earl of Pembroke, and that twelve fees were held of the barony by military service. The places mentioned in the first inquisition are Carru (Carew), Knygh- teston (Knighston), Begelly, Louelleston (Loveston), Jeffryston, Wydoloc (Wed- lock), Coetkellas Coedcanlas), Marthel- twey (Marteltwy), Milton and Oketon (Up- ton), Churchton and Lantegonet (Llandig- wynnet), Pistanernaw (Poyston), Sageston, Williamsfon Harvill (East Williamston), Goldsmith's Angle, and Gonnfreston). In the latter inquisition we find possessions at Pembroke, Tenby, Walwvn's Castle, Grove by Pembroke, Williamston Eluard (East Williamston), and Angle, where Wil- liam de Carew, a younger brother of the last mentioned Sir John, had held lands of the Shiburnes, which afterwards revert- ed to the main branch; we also learn that Sir Nicholas paid twenty-eight shillings yearly for the ward of the tower in the north-east part of the town of Pembroke, called Carew's Tower, and that John Hol- land, Earl of Huntingdon (afterwards Duke of Exeter), lord of Manorbier, held three fees of him in Loveston, Begelly and Carew. H.O. »

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