Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

7 articles on this Page

THE fkmiWS t'tb:. PntL"

Advertising

Advertising

[No title]

Advertising

THE fkmiWS t'tb:. PntL"

News
Cite
Share

coia-rrames will be of grcL t fervice for relieving the house of bedding plants in the spring, for growing- Cucumbers in the summer; and for pro- tecting Lettuces or Calceolaria cuttings in the autumn and winter. Frames are also valuable for growing Cinerarias, Calceolarias, Primulas, and other plants durjng the summer months, and are much better for this purpose than are green- houses in hot weather, particularly if they are arranged so as to have plenty of light but little sun. WORK IN TITH NI RSERY—JANUARY. All pointing worh among the deciduous and other trees and shrum nursery quarters must bo completed as qaicidy as possible. However carefully this work is done, the young roots of the various subjects will be more or less in- jured. and it is of great importance that these should have time to heal before the growing season commences. Where the. land is at all heavy there will be little chance of the turned- up soil becoming weathered and friable so that the hoes may run freely in the .spring. All planting of deciduous forest troos should JU pushed on as fat n the weather wit permit; "Tf the land is wet and heavy, provided the stuff to be planted out has been lifted and laid in by the heels, it should be left until next month. The state of the ground and weather must. however, be the guide in this matter. Seedling stocks for fruit-trees raised from seed last season will be ready for planting out; these should be lifted with as much root as possible, and be planted in nursery rows 2ft. 6in. apart, and about 15in. from plant to plant; here they will remain one, two, or three years, being kept quite clean before budding or grafting. Para- dise stocks, also quince stocks, for working with pears should be got in as quickly as possible now. Prepare land for the sowing of seeds foT fruit-tree stocks by bastard trenching and manuring. THE YOUNG CHTCTT:; TKADE. Chickens may be desDatchcd as soon as their feathers arc dry (in which case they will not re- quire any food) and may be forwarded when a week old. If they are alone they rhould be sent in dozens in a box about eight inches square and five inches high (inside measurement), properly ventilated, or in the small boxes advertised for the purpose, lining the inside with sfer.ns of felt, and bedding the birds on hay. Let the birds be well fed before they are put in. If the journey is to be a long one some biscuit-meal, prepared with milk and afterwards squeezed into a ball, should be put into a small wire cage and made fast at the top of the little box, ro th; t the chickens can partake of it r.t will. Despatch by passenger train, and mark the label in large letters, Live' Birds-With Care—Urgent." and forward them so that they will travel direct and avoid any waiting at junctions; this can be done by perusing a Bradshaw railway guide. As to sending a hen with chickens, place her with them in a stout, closely-wickered basket, or a box, such as a cube sugar case, in the latter instance boring a few holes along the top for ventilation; bed the birds on straw, with a layer of clean hay on top. If the mother be at all fussy the chickens should be placed in a chicken travelling box, and the box made secure to the inside of the basket or c»se near the bottom; or a compartment may be made in the package itself, so that the hen and her charges are separated. A SEASONABLE POULTRY NOTE. Year after year some people lose many chickens from "gapes," says A. W. B. in j Poultry, but the scourge can be stopped. Sprinkle the nest with pyrethrum powder twice or thrioe during the hatching period, and sprinkle the hen freely with it under the breast and wings, and let her have a dust bath. Coop out the chickens twenty-four hours after hatch- ing on the coal ashes, and there will not be much trouble with "gapes." Among hundreds of chickens the writer has not had a rase of gapes" for over three years. In addition to sitting hens, eggs, coops, and other things, there is another important item to be observed in preparing for the hatching season. Chickens when a few days ohl rconire prass. ;+0 -qMjva. lent. To within a (->"• veok? ago we had sheep on the plots intended fcr chickens, and they have left the gras3 in !uitiftu condition for the chicks. Tho'c wh) a lawn or grass should coop their chicks on it. Never mind v-font the neichbo'vrs say. it hapnens to be your affair. not t, will take the more interest in It on this ¡¡[,(0¡nt, If a chicken twentv-four hours old cannot' thrive in the opon "nth its mother, ft" fc" ter mother, we invariably allow it to make its first and last aeonsmt.-ni e with the properties of chloroform. breeding exhibition stock it may "pay" to rodcC" chirks, but where perfection in bone, muscle, and fiesh is required it does not pay to rear invalids. Th. survival of the fittest is a cruel law, but it must be. rigidly ob- served if one expects to be successful vith poultry for utility purposes. Without referring to any particular maker, it is a wise plan to have a stock of chicken meal to break the monotony of "egg and bread crumbs." The chick wants a change after taking up nearly the who "f the yolk of the egg from which It was hatched. 0

THE fkmiWS t'tb:. PntL"