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THE fkmiWS t'tb:. PntL"

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THE fkmiWS t' t b:. PntL" ON SPINACH. My Lancashire correspondent should be able to grow spinach at a profit, for ho is within easy range of one of the best markets in England, and the transit of produce should not cost him very much: in fact, by means of a light cart he could be his own carrier to Liverpool, and, as competition between the various railway com- panies is very keen, he could make favourable terms for the carriage of his produce to the bi0- East Lancashire towns. Round spinach should be sown for spring and summer use. at intervals from February to May. and prickly spinach in July and August for winter-use. The New Zea- ITALIAN- SPINACH. land variety requires to be raised on a gentle hot-bed in April, and planted out in May on a good riih soil in a v. i.rm situation. Sow the round and prickly varieties in drills about an inch ,1" and a foot apart in good rich soil. the richer 1' o better for the summer crop. Abund- ance of moisture and occasional weak liquid manurings will greatly improve the crop. A FINE HARDY PERENNIAL. The winter cherry (Physalis franchetti) is very popular for winter decoration, its scarlet fruit being very effective. It is one of the best hardy perennials, the greater part of which are best raised in the months of May. June, and July, the cultivation being exceedingly simple. Early and vigorous thinning out of the clumps or patches is nearly all that is necessary to ensure an abundance of fine plants, with a profusion of handsome flowers. In sowing, select a somewhat THE WINTER CHERRY. cool and shady situation in preference to one exposed to much sun. Sow thinly, and when the plants are largo enough, prick out 'on nursery beds to strengthen, and plant out early in autumn, or in favourable weather in February and March, where they are intended to flower. Earlv sowing is decidedly the best, as it gives the plants a far better opportunity of becoming sufficiently strong to resist severe trost in winter, and to bloom freely and finely in the coming spring and summer. This is especially the case in reference to double German wallflowers and Brompton stocks, which should not be sown later than the end of May. These being less hardy trlan most classed as such, should have the benefit of a more sheltered snot when finally planted out. wbLh ought. to be done it possible in July. Sweet Williams, unless sown early, will not all bloom the following year. THE CANARY. "F. A." (Leigh-on-Sea). who is anxious to make 2- tiart as a breeder of canaries—a profit- able hwbfcy if carried on in the right way—should take the advice of a friend who is in the fancy" before making his purchase of breeding stock. He might YC,r,v easily drop a lot. of money by rushing into the hobby without thought. An artie in a house facing south will make a splen- did aviary, and although he has no heating apparatus good oil-stoves arc now so cheap and reliable that the difficulty of keeping the temperature in any way even is readily got over. A CINNAMON CANARY. In my days of canarv-breeding, however, a green-house was the favourite aviary, for occa- sionally the birds could be given a flight without harm being done, and they were all the better for it; while the insects which they discovered Oil the plants and vine provided them with capi- tal food. Cage Birds, a weekly paper which can be obtained at any bookstall, is a good medium for advertisements. A GREENHOUSE DEFINED. J The greenhouse, says a writer in the Garden Home, as distinguished from the conservatory, is generally filled with plants in a preparatory stage, with the idea of transferring them to the conservatory when at their best. At the present sca-on. Roman Hyacinths, Lilies of the Valley, \Pr;,er-white Narcissus, and early Tulips are be- mg regularly supplied for decoration, whilst Primulas, Lilac, Cytisus, Deutzias, Spiraeas, Hyacinths, later Tulips, and Narcissus of all sorts are being pushed along to take their turn from now to Easter, according to the require- ments of the establishment. Freezias too, being brought along in heat, are just shewing their very pretty and dainty spikes of bloom. Useful Grapes may be grown in such a house, as well as a great number of plants. Camellias, Ferns, and fine-foliaged Begonias succeed admirably under Vines in summer, while spring-flowering plants ( — kfo" the Yiues are iu led., The

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THE fkmiWS t'tb:. PntL"

THE fkmiWS t'tb:. PntL"