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When a distinguished person dies, there Is generally a somewhat morbid eagerness to pnblish his parting words, and it is to be feared that in some cases the sense of dramatio fitness is only satisfied by the in- vention of something which s considered to be appropriate. One can rarely be sure of the accuracy of any reported last words, and yet we would rather not be told that there was no foundation for such sentences as the schoolmaster's, "It grows dark, boys; you may go," or Mozart's I I Now I begin to see what might be done in music." Of the beloved King of Denmark it is said that his last words were God bless you, my children," which have conveyed the final farewell of many a good man. Death we are told knocks with impartial foot at the cottages of the poor and the palaces f of kings," and indeed it would appear from reports of the closing scene at Copenhagen that the King died very much as millions ( of his subjects have died before him. But j it is not given to many men to be regretted j as the King of Denmark has been, not only j by his own people, but in all the capitals of Europe. l The principle is coming to be recognised that if &emi-barbarous nations wish to re- main independent, they must nob be per- mitted to make themselves a nuisance to the rest of the world. The governments of two or three countries haee endeavoured to resist the demand by playing off one European Power against another, but there are indications that that device will not be tolerated much longer, and if the interna- tional conference at Algeciras is as success- ful as is hoped it will probably not be long before the plan which has been tried with respect to Morocco is extended to the South East of Europe. It was of oourse right that the conference should extend respect- ful consideration to the Moroccan proposals, but in the main they have been found quite impracticable. If the Sultan had gone back to the rules of Aristotle he would have done much better, but as it was he only reverted—unconsciously no doubt-to theories which were tested a few hundred years ago, and discarded by all the civilised Powers. The only thing that was new about them appears to have been a suages- tion to tax posts, telegraphs and telephones, which does not seem to have excited the enthusiasm of the delegates. On the other hand the conferance accepted the Moroccan proposals for the imposition of certain stamp duties, whioh ,are not likely to prove an unqualified boon. In this country these duties result in innumerable injustices ow- ing to the omission of ignorant people to stamp documents which ought to be stamp- ed, and if the duties operate in Morocco as they do here, the people are not likely to feel very grateful for their introduction. In these days when we hear so much of foreign competition, especially Jin trade with our own Colonies, it is refreshing to come across some examples of the success of British enterprise. The construction of motor steam fire engines is essentially a new British industry, [and the following k report which has just reached the principal of the firm of Messrs. Merryweather and Sons, of London, from Cape Town, is in- teresting "I now have pleasure to con- gratulate yourself and firm for the splen- did 500 gallon motor, 'Fire King,' you have delivered to this department. Several record runs have been made along some of our steep gradients, with the greatest of ease, and the brakes have acted admirably when going down the same. It also gives me much pleasure to testify to the capable pumping capacity, two lin. jets from the 3-lin. delivery, and two jets each lin. from her 2!in. deliveries were simultaneously, delivered about 100 feet high, 120lbs. of steam being steadily maintained. I con- sider your present motor, '-Fire King,' the fiaest fire-fighting appliance in the market, and wish you every success in the future." When we remember that in America the motor engine of native make has been dis- carded as a failure by the New York and other fire departments we may, for onoe, say a good word for our own countrymen who have evidently succeeded in making an efficient machine of this class. < The majority of swindles that are carried on in this country depend for their immun- ity upon the fact that the man who is not worth powder and shot has no responsibil- ity to the civil law, and can do whatever he pleases, so long as he does not bring himself within the reach of the criminal code. That is the explanation of the "mock auction", to which attention has been drawn. The reference is not to the Cheap Jack who condacts what is known as a "Dutch Auction," but to men who have taken out a 9,10 licence and conduct sales of showy, trashy, and almost worth- less goods in London and the large provin- cial towns. It is alleged that these men employ decoys, who surround the rostrum, and bid for each article as it is put up, un- til some stranger is induced to make an offer, and finds that the article is promptly knocked down to him. If men are thus employed to encourage bidders, the auc- tioneer and those assisting him can be pros- ecuted for conspiracy, but no private indi- vidual is likely to take proceedings which would involve him in much trouble and ex- pense, unless the Auctioneers' Institute, or some similar body, gives attention to the matter, this mode of imposition will con- tinue to flourish.

SOLYA.

PEMBROKESHIRE COUNTYI COUNCIL.

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HAVERFORDWEST MAN'S /HEROISM.

Haverfordwest District Council.

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ST. DAVID'S.

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