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THE FARMER'S .PACE. rr%uB-'

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THE FARMER'S .PACE. rr%uB-'

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I A DOUBLE CANTERBURY BELL. I and May is the best time for sowing. The pyra- midalis and alba form very useful and handsome pot plants; while the best varieties for the garden are the double white, of which an illus- tration is given, the turbinata, the calycanthemi (blue, white, and rose coloured), and perricifolis. TOMATOES. The present is a good time to sow a batch of tomato seed for second early work, says a writer. This is a work that is done in a variety of ways in market places, and very often not so well as it misrht be. Very generally boxes are used for this purpose, but for winter sowings we do not like them. In our opinion there is nothing so good for the purpose as pots 32's or 24's. These should be quite clean, and if new be soaked for an hour before getting them ready for seed sowin.fr. We usually turn a small pot upside down over the drainage hole, and fill in round this with small cinders, putting over the whole a thin layer of moss or fibre. The soil for seed-raising should be three parts light loam, one part leaf mould or fine iadoo fibre, 000 part tfand, and g-part air-slaked lime. If some powdered charcoal is to hand g-part of this will be a great advantage. The pots should be filled to within Jin. of the rims, and then be watt-red with boiling water through a fine rose. When the water has soaked away, and before the soil the water has soaked away, and before the soil I, has become cold, the seeds should be sown thinly over the surface, not like mustard and cress, as is so generally the case, but at an average of jin. I between the seeds. The whole should be covered with iin. of fine compost, and the pots be covered with sheets of glass. The propagating house should not go below 70deg.Fahr., and if the seed is rood it will soon germinate. A care- ful watch nn:3t be kept, and the moment there is seen to be a movement in the soil the glass must be removed, or the seedlings will become dra vn or spoilt. If the propagating house is a good one, the sheets of glass can be dispensed with altogether. The seed pot should be kept well up to the glass of the house—12in. will be a good distance—and with careful watering and ventilation the plants will come into the rough leaf whiK ihan 2in. high. CUCUIIUEBK The present will do well for the sowing of the seeds of cucumbers for early spring of fruit for market, and it may not be out of place to give a hint or two about the way in which this work should bo done. It may be thought that anyone can raicp a cucumber plant from seed, but we know t' *a t ruany make but a poor job of it, and that through not adopting the best methods many seeds are wasted, and where they do come up many of the plants arc poor attenuated things that rarely get away properly when planted opt. The first necessity is a cucumber house or pro- pagating pit, in which a heat of 75deg. to 80dog. can be maintained, and a bottom heat of 85deg. If a thousand plants are wanted, then quire 1,200 seeds should be sown, as no matter how good the seeds may be there are sure to be a good rnanv seedlings winch a eood grower will reject. We like- a soil composed of three parts light fresh loam. half a part good fibrous peat rubbed through a in., sieve, and the remainder made up 01 leaf rauuid and shiiru sand. To | every bushel of this compost a 48-pot full of r.ir- j slaked li;r." ihoulu be well mixed in. Small 60- 19 pots sh<»ij.( he crocked and be filled with this within 410. of their rims. The soil should i)- wde niceiv moist, and then be raised to ;ie j temperature of the hous* Then the ds shouM he sown one in ^ach pot. putting the seed 1 in <-dg\ ways .nd covr iug it af.'oin j|in. wish the j soil. The pot.- should he plugged *•• rims 1 in ashes or coco; fibre refuse., aud i1- >- o'o | be over'-d whh Tin. of rnof-- tht4- has b^en r>r». viovflj V < '.S d twi do.ni-iw «/>«•« It .c | tflmpe.ratrrLi i« l-cpt steady at as near 80deg. as tV thtt is of any use rvi'! bo up i-.h t^.t <'■" s, f!?r. nrut ;>e r rauss t"" ni..rpm.t the seeds pco., :r:r aoi! *r>'l 'vr with a deformed cot' ,n b: .u" -.1 ,-i ;V: I n, • S ,n' ru .j Ioii ra' '•* in iji. o. z' ••; be kept v.0 "••ayed, ?V: '• ¡ obes Lci ij < thf: mc <■ tiio Poet: "This, sir, is the only poem I ever wrote." Editor: "Well, cheer up. Nobody's going to take it away from you." Friend: "Are you superstitious? Do you be- lieve in signs?" Successful Merchant: "No. Newspaper advertisements are better-and cheaper." Father: What makes thiak ye-u can sup- port my daughter?" Suitor: "Well, I've been engaged to her for two years, and it hasn't broke me." Sea Captain: "What do you call this?" Waiter: "Bouillon, sir." Sea Captain: Well, well; I must have sailed on bouillon all my life and did not know it." That's arrant nonsense," said Mr. Henpeck, about there always being room at the top." Oh," his wife sarcastically replied, when were you up to see?" SHE: "Do you know what I'd do if you should try to kiss me?" He: "No. Why? She: Oh! nothing; only you don't seem to have any curiosity." Oh, Tom, that I should see you come home in that condition." M'dear, ain't I always talkin to you 'bout goin' t' sleep 'n leavin' gash buruin ? It s simply ridiculous His Wife: "You're home at last! I thought youd never come." Mr. Outlate: "And ab- sence, instead of making the heart grow fonder, has merely affected the temper." Let me learn from your eyes what my fate is to be, sang the poet; "let them teach me the secrets. "Thank you," interrupted the lady; "they have pupils enough now." Ascum: "Jabsley is awful vain, isn't he?" Wander: "Well, rather. Why, he has fitted up a phonograph in his room to play See the conquering hero comes!' when he opens the door." SUITOR I cannot boast of wealth-but I I have bruins. The members of my literary club will teii you that you would have the smartest debater in town for a son-in-law!" Father: And I can assure you, my dear fellow, that you would have, the greatest lecturer in the town for a mother-in-law! "Patience: "J saw that handsome Mr. Styles we met at the hall in his motor-car to-day." Patrioe: "Did he speak to you?" "Yes; he shouted to me to look out &8 I WM crossing the vtrcet."