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THE FARMER'S .PACE. rr%uB-'

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THE FARMER'S PACE. r r% u B- A NOTE ON BUILDING. There is a lull in the building of bungalows and country cottages just now, but I hear that at Cleveleys—between Blackpool and Fleetwood —an exhibition, on the lines of the one held during the past summer at Letchworth, is already being arranged. I am reminded of this by a question as to how one of my correspondents can keep the basement wails of a house which he is about to build perfectly dry and prevent the rainwater from soaking through. The level of the basement floor is several feet below the ground level, and the building is to be in a dry and eanjiy soil. WATERPROOFING FOUNDATIONS. It is easy to keep basement walls perfectly dry if they are covered with waterproofing, applied as follows: Put on three coats of burlap or two coats of builders' paper and one coat of burlap, each coat being laid in and thoroughly covered with hot asphaltum. Care should be taken to see that the builders' paper or burlap is lapped at least six inches, and also to see that the different layers break joints. In order to be sure that the dampness will not rise up through the brick wall itself, a damp joint such as is shewn in the above sketch should be used. This damp joint consists of the same material as the waterproofing on the outside of the wall de- scribed above, and should be applied as indicated in the sketch in order not to break the bond in the wall. If the building were not located in a dry soil, we should also recommend covering the top of the concrete used for your basement floor with waterproofing the same as specified for the outside wall, making a point between this waterproofing and damp joint where it comes through the brick wall. This would make your basement walls and floor absolutely imper- vious to water or dampness, but would not of course prevent the condensation of moisture from the atmosphere if the temperature of the basement is lower than that of the outside air. The latter can only be prevented by good ventilation. A PORTABLE WATER HEATER. A very simple portable water heater has re- cently been invented by an American; it is in- tended particularly for warming the water in a bathtub or a basin. The heater is arranged in the form of a float which floats on the water, and can thus be moved around to different parts of the tub as desired. Our illustration shews the device heating a basinful of water. It consists of a copper shell or bowl fitted into a wooden ring. The latter affords sufficient buoyancy to float the device. A gas burner is supported on the float, and consists of a pipe bent to project into the copper shell. The open end of this pipe terminates near the bottom of the bowl. At its outer end the pipe is formed with a number of perforations which permit an inflow of air to in- crease the temperature of the flame. The quan- tity of air Juimiitttd is governed by a sleeve on the pipe, which may be moved to cover any de- sired number of holes. A flexible tube connects the burner with a gas fixture. The flame of the A PORTABLE WATER HEATER. burner is directed asrain=t the bottom of the copper bowl. heatinsr the thin shell to a hirh de- pree of temperature. To confute the heat within the bowl, several rings of coiled wire are piaccd within, as indicated in the ennraving. These coils effect a pr^ot. savin-' of hei* so that the I water surrounding" the heater is raised to a high temperature at an consumption of gas. The value of this -ili be particularly felt in summer ti"'lf' when the cooking is done ordinarily on a small ![!L tOY{> ÍlF teor! of a coal ranp-e, and it is consequently difficult to obtain a supply of hot water. With this novel heater a basinful of hot water roav h" obtained in a few moments, and at short no* ice enouch can be heated for the bath; while there can bp no ques- tion as to its value on the farm or in the kennel where hot often required at short notice. CLOVER AS AN EGO-PRODTJCIB. Experienoe has often demonstrated the value of clover for egg-producing. Clover has just the material in it to form egg-shell, hence it be- comes an essential part of every ration given to the fowls. It may not be generally understood that there are nearly 301b. of lime contained in « J J • clover. The hens and pullets led daily with clover will consequently prove better egg-layers than those denied it. The clover hay should be given to fowls in winter in quan- tities sufficient to satisfy them, and to make them eat more it is desirable sometimes to pre- pare it in various ways. Cook and chop it, and mix it with meal or other stuff. This will some- times induce the hens to consume a great amount of clover every day. Cut into short lengths and mixed with warm mash, and then given only as fast as the fowls will clean it up each day, is pro- bably the most economical way to supply the clover. Some people cut the second crop of clover and place it in the poultry-yard for the birds to eat and scratch over at pleasure. This of itself is all nrrl-¡t, but it is rather wasteful. More than half the ciov. r will be lost, and the fowls do not actually eat much more than the leaves. The stalks contain most of the lime, and these should be prepared so that the birds will consume them. Cf all the f(')d that can be raised on a farm for poultry, clover is not only the best, but probably the cheapest, and a field of it is as essential to success as a pasture field is necessary to the success of dairying. A BLAUTIFUL LANT. The family of which the Canterbury bell (Cam- panula medi is a-member forms a highly in- teresting and dr-'i-l.ie class of handsome flower- ing plants for the a doration of the garden. The large hells cf the pure white varieties are especi- ally hand son e, :h; should bo freely grown for the contra-t •.vhi.fi r.htv afford with most other flowers. The double varieties are especially fine,

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THE FARMER'S .PACE. rr%uB-'