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A Pneumatic SPBAYEB.

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SHEEP DIPPING.

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A Pneumatic SPBAYEB.

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place are provided with movable glass panels for use in winter. (5) Improved racks for the rais- ing and lowering of lioors, this entirely avoiding use in winter. (5) Improved racks for the rais- .,I. ing and lowering of lioors, this entirely avoiding the cumbersome method of packing floors with litter to brimr chicks close up to pipes. (6) Small ecre^ss doors leading to runs are cut in larger ones, the smaller doors being used in winter and the larger ones in summer. The advantages of this must be apparent. (7) The heaters are now covered with a very thick asbestos jacket. This economises oil considerably, and increases the heat in the pipes. Practically it gives double the he-al with a consumption of about half the oil previously used. PROPAGATION OF GLOIRE DE LORRAINE BEGONIA FROM LEAVES. Plants raised from leaf cuttings, rooted quite early make by far the finest plants, says a writer in Gardening lilitstrated.1 Not only are Begonias of this class raised and reared in the early half of winter larger than those propagated later, they have also grown into better formed and more evenly balanced plants, are stouter and bushier, and, in consequence, less liable to quickly succumb to the hardships of dwelling- house plant life. These plants propagated early from leaf-cuttings shew a great profusion of bloom, more dense and evenly spread, than do plants raised from soft wood cuttings. Fully grown leaves, sound and healthy, are taken here and there from the thriftiest plants. They are cut so that a piece of the leaf-stalk, from a quarter-inch to half-inch long. remains on the leaf. This goes into the sand and, when I thoroughly firmed, holds the leaf m an almost upright position, its base touching the sand. A covering of sashes over the bench for several weeks, thus making it a regular propagating I ease, is not absolutely neccssary, but, if rightly managed, will help considerably in gaining a start. Its office is to keep the cuttings close and to assist in holding a sieudv, uniform moisture in the samd. To exclude air entirely for nay length of time would cause many or all the leaves to damp off. :md for this reason some air should at all times be admitted and the sashes be tightly closed only when the house receives direct airing through the open ventilators. A buoyant atmosphere in the house greatly reduces )1 the percentage of loss. With about 70deg. of heat in the propagating case, uniform moisture, a shading on sunny days, and a slight circulation of air at all tiiines, the new growths coming from the base of the leaves will be ready for potting in about eight weeks. FEEDING EXPERIMENTS WITH BACON HOGS. The bacon industry in Canada has grown to considerable importance, and while it is well 'I known that the best food for young pigs is plenty of skim-milk, as the quantity available of this material is no longer sufficient, tho question has arisen as to what is the best substitute or tho most suitable food to help out the short sup- ply of skim-milk. To obtain information on this subject, the Contra! Experimental Farm at Ottawa have been conducting experiment* with mixtures which, according to composition. should take the place of skim-mi.Ur as nearly as t possible. For these mixture* materials easily ob. tainable and low in price wore selected. The pigs were all fed in pens in winter. One lot was fed on shorts and skim-milk cons'd^rnd to be an ideal ration. The young piga gained 41b. to 51b. per day, and made lCClb. in 1521b. of meal and 5541b. of skim-milk. When put. on heavier foods for finishing, the made gains right along, hav- ing had a good start. Another lot received shorts and gluten meal in equal part*. The re- ports describe this as a good I,ol! for milk or beef, but apparently not so suitable for pork. and the results wore not satisfactory. A third lot had 4001b. of shorts and 1001b. of oil meal. Where there is no skim-miik. this is about as rheap a feed as can b»« used, and has a good effect in di-estion With 2801b. of this mixture a gain of 1001b. was made at a cost of 13s. per cwt. A fourth lot, fed on oats and ground oil- cake. or oil meal, gained 1001b. on 3221b of food. But this food is objectionable unless tho husks are removed from the oats. or the oats very j finely ground. A fifth lot was fed on a combina- tion of oil cake, shorts, and oats rmxod. and to this were added equal parts of kim milk. The pigs put on flesh at the rafo of 21b. to All). per day. From experiments, the conclusion is drawn that no. or iii*»utTicient, skim mIlk I is available, shorts and oil meal will come very I near it, and is as cheap a mixture as can be got. -Afark Lane Express. I