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[PUBLLSEIED BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT.} THE IRON HAND. By J. MAcLAREN COBBAN, Author of "Pursued by the Law," "The L fL$t AlivV The Angel of the Covenant, "The Mystery of the Golden Tooth," &o., &c. [COPYHISHT.] 1 SYNOPSIS OF PREVIOUS CHAPTERS. I T ne seeiie <)peii. in a CHAPTERS 1. and II.—Tne scene opens tn a curiosity shop at Finborough, w. we an oid gentleman is wishing to buy aiioid steel gauntlet. ntt. it is already to the manager ot .he County Bank, Mr. Lidmore. Alter t'le gentler ■ .cian's departure Lefroy informs his wife, JtliliL, t'-at Mr. Lidmore has bought tho gaunJet. 'l'J,cy ?Mi to leave for Loi?n. and afterwards e? ou, tor ? stroll. During the foUowin? n?ht bw gauntlet is stobn. In the morning: Lefroy is awakened by hearing voices. He tnru.ts, hi "iicad out of the window and finds that t e CoG,ll- versatlon is taking place iu the room overhead lxHwfion two men, one of them Mr. Lidn.ore, and Ht odilcorns himself. The superintendent of poliN -join,i the two men, and Lefroy hoars more. The tjank. safe has been robbed, and £30,000 stolen. bank manager give., details of how he bought the Aeel gauntlet, and of how it was found oaught -in the grip of the patent lock. Lefroy is sus- netted, a.nd also his wife as his aecon.pl ce. He rouses his wife, and gives her ten minutes to feel ready. An ostler in the ocachyard below is bar ■«;e->ing a rraro in a high trap to carry tlr. :Lidmore's "friend" to Redbeck-a distance of twenty miles. Lefroy orders a trap for himsou and proffers to hold the mare's head wi. lt> tho -,o,itler goes to the bar. Lefroy gets his wife and l child into the trap, springs in himse.i. and they "are off Soon they hear cries of Stop Thief! CHAPTERS III. and IV.-The young coup^ e: .get clo&r away. They visit Lefroy's old nurse, Martha, who livqs at a. farm on the i,.ooriind. There tha baby is left in the good woman's eare, while Julia goes up to London alone. Lefroy -return with the mare and gives himself up. The following dav he goes before the magistratos. All the evidence is against him, and he is com- nitted for trial at the next Assizes. in the eftenioon be is taken to the county town to gaol. A gin geta into the same oompartment, and whan the two poLcemen who have Lefroy in charge have fallen asleep she informs the prisoner that. her father, Tippy Haynes, and others, are In. the robbery. CHAPTER V. FOUND GUILTY. I Tho engine whistled as :t neared the' next JJhtiou, the pcliceiRen woke up. and Sal Haynes relapsed into her silent and downcast attitude. When the train drew up at the platform Sal got out. Before the door Wa3 closed again she. turned and looked at Lefroy. Good-bye, Mr. Lefroy," said she. I'm. real sorry for you, and I wish you luck." When she wa gone and the door was looked, the policeman who had clain.ed acquaintance with her turned to Lefroy and asked a question. Do you krow Sulky Sal?" I saw her in the court to day. answered Lefroy. He hesitated to say he had eld talk with her a few minutes ago, but he ventured a question. I heard you call her the daughter of 'Tippy Haynes who is Tippy Haynes?" Ah." said the policeman, quite affably, you don't know T.ppyTippy is a character and he is in your own trade—as YCll may say. He is a locksmith—and a clever one, tco. You take any lock to him—any lock ycu like—and he'll find a ke? for it." Lefroy ventured ke(y t Yo-u say he's a character," Lefroy ventared; do. you mean he's a suspicious character?" Well," said the policeman, that depends on what you mean by 'suspicious.' He don't look the sort of cha.p you'd trust with everything you've got but a man may lock like a thief, and le ain't; and an-cther man may not look like a thief, and he is. There you are. All I san. say M. the police ain't got nothing agaln-t Tippy." There was a. clear reference to Lefroy himself in that disquisition, and he asked no more ques- tions. He arrived without furthor incident at the ga.ol-" the Castlo"of the county town, where he had to await his trial at the Assizes. The Assizes would net be held until towards the end •of October, so e had some weeks to lie in durance—a suspected man, but still presumably an innocent. It was a weary timea weary time —how weary none but a prisoner, and a solitary prisoner, can teli. Being still presumed to be innocent, he was allowed ooc ks and pen and ink end paper. He was too restless and distracted in mind to g've much attention to books, especially to such books as were set at his choice, but he was soothed and cheered by writing. He wrote ..a diary—in the form of letters to his wife, which tie kept for post ng at a convenient opportunity. He had little or nothing of incident to relate, so he wrote of his feelings and wondered what was happening to her. Let one or two of the last of these entries stand as typical of tlie.,ii "October 22nd.-My darling Juida.—Tho time* of waiting is nearly at an end, and in a day or two' I shall know my fate one way or other—whether I am to meet you again soon and gather your dear, sweet persen close in my arms, or whether I am doomed to remain apart from you for years. I I due not dwell on the second pO.3¡b;;ity; the' thought of it is too horrible—too much like abco luta and finai separation--too much like death. I wonder sometimes, my sweetheart, whether vou have been happy with me. Our married life C!t!ierto has been very short, very hard, very ■ troubled. In spite of all that I was very happy with ycu; your sweetness, and beauty, and gentle- ness were my daily delight they were better than money; they were the meat and drink of my soul. I loved you all through, and, I think, you loved mo but I wonder—I wonder—did you find my love compensate for the drawbacks of cur life? Sometimes I fear that you did not; that you wer". so oppressed with our pover:y and our ill-success that you found life, even with love, a very miserable affair. My deare t, there is not much use in making promises; but. if this trouble passes quickly, as I hope and pray it will then if human resolution and human effort count for anything. I wiil make your life easy, and prosperous, and bright—bright and gladsome a sailing upon summer seas." The next entry is more matter-of-fact. It is noteworthy from the mention of his counsel. Ootober 23rd.-I had a visit to-day from the young barrister who is to defend me. I have no money to engage a counsel myself, so the Court appoints me one from among the young, un- ttriefed barristers who go on circuit. He saems very intelligent, and oertainly looks a very re- markable young fellow. He is tall and very dark; he wear? an extraordinary fell of black hair, which he is oonstantantly tossing- or pushing fcaek from his forehead, a very heavy black mous- tache, and a single eye-glass. He has an easy, lofty, haw-haw manner, and to add to the dis- tinction of hh appearance he has a strong hawk- like nose. You see I am impressed by him and I have the greatest hopes of his making a good case for me. We became quite friendly, and he did me g-cod by saying he entirely accepted my story of what had happened, and would work it for all he is worth. He was interested in what I toud him of Tppy Haynes's white-faced girl, but he doubts if we have time to make her -evidence of any value, for the trial is set down for to-morrow. He is going to Finborough at once to look her up. If anything oomes of that he will ask for a postponement to-morrow?" That is the last entry in Lefroy's diary. The young barrister's name, as many of my readers will have guessed, was Townshend. He straight- way journeyed to Finborough and returned late at night. He saw his client. Lefroy, early next morning to tell him the result of his journey. I am afraid," said he, there is nothing to fee made of that girl. Perhaps my going ■ frightened her, but she denied having ever spoken .t.e you." "Denied it?" exclaimed Lefroy. Absolutely and without qualification," an swerod Mr. Townshend. "Perhaps, as I have ..a d, she was frightened," Her father wasn't there, was bet" "Of oourse not. I'had sent in a boy with a message that he was wanted immediately to open a lock at a house about a mile off, and then I saw him set out." "Perhaps," Lefroy again ventured to suggest, she repented of having given her father away." Perhaps," said Townshend, in his voice of ■well-balanced sonority. But at agy rate there is the faûe-she- quite denied having said a word to you, and she looked at me steadily with those black eyes of hers and said you must have dreamed it." "Perhaps I did," murmured Lefroy, sadly. But," he added, "she did not deny having been in the railway carriage." No; she did not deny that. But." said Towus-henrl, with his odd flutter of smile, that just tified the corner of his moustache, we tiring that in as evidence." No," Rtoid Lefroy; I see that." He was it the depth of deletion. Not till then bed he und&rstood how mUlh his hope. erf.deliver- ance had bee?, built on what -Sal Ilaynes had told •aliira. We must ? through with the case MR it is," s&id Townsh?ud, laying a friendly hand; on Lefroy's shoulder, "and make the no,ct_of it." Letroy believed that these words signified that his counsel had no exaggerated notiou of ^fche strength of his de fence, so he forbore to say any- thing. In another hour or two he stood in tie dock iu front of the Judge of Assize, who •porutinir.ed him with keen, shrewd eyes. Thf're is no need to dwell on the trial: it was of a very ordinary kind. and resembled a ^thousand others. Thsro was no sensational in- cident—except, perhaps, at the very end; and when all was over thEe were probably but two persona bevvies the prisoner who did not believe that justice had been done. The evidence for sthe prosecution was only of the circumstantial -sort, but it seemed very convincing-. Thepriawier had prcpa-red ;o 1ea.ve the town of Finborough the prisoner's precious dr.d gauntlet—there it was before the eyes of the C^art—had been found in the grip ,.f Lheo patent wife and the prisoner -was one of the very few who knew the triok of the safe look. It was trtio that i/orxo of the stolen money had been traced to the pri-oner indeed, aione of it had been traced at all yet—but he and 'his wife had been seen by a police-man counting lank-notes—" sheaves of notes" was bis ohraso— and where was the wife now? A touch of pathc". which told against the prisoner, was introduced by the announcement that the bank manager was dying—stricken by t'tig jeri'ibfe t{); And ace he had sustained. The defence was mainly a negative, and it needed a counsel in longer practice than Townshend to make the most of it. The law was not then made by which a prisoner may give evidence, and he could call no witnesses Gn tils behalf. His counsel could but protest for him that he knew absolutely nothing of the robbery, ajid oouid but set fortll how his time had been spent. Two damaging admissions had to be made:-He had feared arrest; and he had taken means to convey hi wife away. Mr. Townshend aJowod that the prisoner's explanation of these facts might seem incredible or insufficient, but at the same time Lo scored by demanding why Lefroy had not feared arrest the evening before instead of in the morning—it wou.d have been quite easy for him and his wife to have cleared otf after the policeman had seen them with the banknotes—and wny he had returned to give hiinsel: up, except that he had believed, the charge against him was one of which he was in- nooent and which could not be sustained. He ended by insisting that the evidence against Lefrey was not suoh as could convict a reputed much less a man of respectable character. The jury reared, and returned in a few minutes with a verdict of Guilty; and the judge, after leoturing the prisoner on his moral turpitude, sentenced him to penal servitude for hie !-It was a tsrribie sentence and, although the judge was ksb&wn to be severe, it evoked a. gasp of dismay from the whoie oourt. Moreover, when the sentence was uttered a girl who had sat through the trial in the front of the gallery—a girl with a white face and black eyes—screamed, and was carrie-d out in hysterics. Then the prisoner, as white as the hysterical girl, asked if na might say one word. The judge gave him leave.. ..i I protest I am innocent, my lord, and the real crimina.is will yet be found." "Stand down, sir," said the judge, severely. So the innocent Lefroy was led away to his terrible punishment. His counsel was permitted a final interview. When they met Lefroy was in a. mood of calm desperation. I 1ioffi so bitterly sorry," said Townshend. "Yeu wouldn't think, would you, that justice oould go so very far wrong in (Ho was young then, be it observed; and he thought very differently a. few years later.) Oh, you couldn't help it," answered Lefroy. It's nobody's fault. The thing has gone. l awry, and I can quite see—oh, 1 can see quite pia.iulr-that I ha.ve done a great deal to set the case awry. And it is quite right that the punishment for such a crime should be heavy, but I wish-I wih-that the real criminals had to bear it instead of me. I am," said he, with a bitter smile, "the vicarious sufferer—that's the word, isp't it?" Yes, that's the word," said Townshend. But I really can't tell you how disappointed I am that I could not do better for you than I have done. I don't mind saying to you that I am new-pretty new -to pleading, and perhaps I did not do so well as an older hand might have done." An older hand," said L-efroy, "would have no better. I am sure of that. It was a very bod ca^e; and," again ho smiled, I only regret it was mine." "I suppose," said Townshend, "you saw the effect of your sentence on that Haynes's girl?" I did," answered Lefroy. "She should not be lost sight of-she and her father," said Townshend. But I en t keep sight of them," said Lefroy. I can," answered Townshend, and I will." It is very kind of you," said Lefroy. My dear fellow, I intend to work for your deliverance. It should not be very difficult to spot the rea.1 culprits, and I should like you to thing of mo as your friend—and not as your counsel. Lefroy was deeply moved. Thank you," wa- all he said; but he grasped tight the proffered liand-a strong, capahie hand. long and nervous. "Now tell me," continued Townshend; "is there anything else you would like me to do for you as a frietid:" I have told you of my wife," said Lefroy. "You might find her out and see how she is getting on. I sent her to London, and advised her to seek out some friends at Hammersmith." (And he named the friends.) "Sile will pass by her maiden name, Julia Galotti. I arranged to address her by that name, "Pcste Restante, Hammersmith.' I have been afraid to send a letter to hc-r from here, lest the police should get at her; but I have here a diary I have written for her reading. You might deliver that into her hands. Will you?" Gladly," answered Townshend. "There is one other little thing," said Lefroy. "The steel gauntlet you saw; it is mine. Don't lose iigiit of it. Get possession of it if you can. I have a feeling—a superstition, if you like--that my fortune is bound to that thing." 1 11 see to it," said Townshend. The time allowed for the iuterview was at an end. They closed hands in a final clasp. "I'll find means to communicate with you," said Townshend. And if you ever can cam- muiicate with me, I'm in Plowden Buildings, Temple." I have one thing to thank this business for," said Lefroy; it has found me a friend. Good- bye. So they parted; and a. great gulf was fixed between them--a. gulf as between the dead and the living. I CHAPTER VI. I I "THAT'S HIM!" I Wheii the prison doors closed upon Lefroy, Mr. Townshend returned into the busy ways o: the worid, but with the resolve to do his utmost for the deliverance of the hapless young man, and, by ocnsequence, for the discovery of the trtly guilty. His thought turned to the one peroon who had given hint of any knowledge of the culprits, aud his ingenuity to the possibility of learning more from her. But he was young in these days, and his native cleverness was unpractised. He wished to get at all Sal Haynes might know about the burglary, but he had no experience to guide him into the way of fulfilling his wish. Thus preoccupied he arrived, valise in hand, at the railway station. He stood in the wide booking-hall, feeling in his pocket for money to pay his fare to the next town of assize, when he suddenly beoame aware that a girl with a white face and large dark eyes was observing him. The girl was Sal Haynes; and with her was a little man w.th a white face and pinkish eye-a human white ra-whom Townshend recognised at once as Tippy Haynes. The girl evidently had said no word to her father, either then or before, concerning her interview with Townshend, for the eye of the little white-faced man flitted like a bird from one thing to another before him without taking particular note of anything, and certainly without taking note of Townshend and therefore Townshend shrewdly judged that the girl considered what association she had had with the condemned Lefroy important enough to be kept secret. He could not assail the girl then with questions, but he resolved that he would get at her the first opportunity he could contrive. A few minute later he was seated in a first- class smoking compartment of the train, rolling a cigarette. He noted casually, a yard or two off, on the platform, a tall, strong fellow with red hair and freckled face, and grey eyes that moved this way and that like quicksilver, taking noto of everything. He stood well-planted and soiid, giving no hint by bodily movement of any kind of the doubt and expectation which his eyes betrayed. While Townshend remarked this tail, strong fellow ar;d his solidity, another man smaller and better dressed, camo uD behind and slapped him vigorously on the back. What. Struthers, old friend," he cried in a hearty voice. "Yutt here?" Thotnll man turned promptly. Holka, I o.Ioa, he a,d, in an accent of which there could not be a. moment's doubt that it was Scottish. Is that you, Mr. Evans?" But his tone rOIl, fessed that Mr. Evans was not the person he had been hoping to see, and that he was not rejoiced to meet Mr. Evans. ia ^r" Evans. "Of course it is. Who d.d you think it was?" Imphm," murmured Struthers; an exclama- w  i c 1, u 'e d a tion which, as he used it, meant as near oothing human voice could express. "Are you going, on by "this train?" asked -Air.- Evans. Ay," answered Struthers, looking around him w ith careful VagU<L'1U~s "this' is my train. Imphm Weil, let us jump in," said Mr. Evans. It'll be off in. a couple of minutes." And he drew from his pocket a large gold wa.tch, which was artao] ,:ed to his waistcoat by a heavy cable chain, Goubie-Iooped. Here's a smoker. Let's get in here. third F;rat'" sajd Struthers. "I'm only Chi r(l. "I^h?" Jlaid Evam. with a ?"? of the "yc. "T thought now that you are better og—eh? No, mm; satd Struther? severely. "Even if was better off. I'd not spend good sin?r on a ft, ??t"ffy u i: s?t. stuSy_.u?uon-I would not-when I can ha,v? ?<?"?' eaithy board; for that's aU that ? thpd!tferenc& comes to" Gome along." said Evans, shovin? him for- ward. 'In with you. I'"??the difference M?rut?h<5 ?roda to the door of the carriage 'n havy, ciumpm? bo?. and heavily he hauled him- ,f Wi'> ?'?wed hghcly by Mr. Evans. .b?y sat .? down opposite to Townshend, and the door WM again shut. Th'y both emitted a spark of surprise at tho fight of Townshend, whether becauso they recognised him or bccauso they had expected to find the compartment empty Tov/ns- hend could not at -il- moment guess. Mr. Evans produced an ornate cigar-case, and took from it a [)¡2o fat cigar, which he stuck in his month. Then he UX>K out another and handed it to Struthers-- which Townshend noted as ::n act rather of patron- jj age than of Ir.endhne s. I ciidn t expert to fiini you this way a" orain, i ftfr-it-iers," said Mr. Evaas. j Struthers cast a quick glance at Townshend be- l. ore reply INC. "I'm just here to clear lII) some L)llt.?? of bii-ness i,,Lforo I settle down po,>  er l y i n "And marry, I suppose?" suggested Mr. Evans. "Not m." said Struthers. "I'm not a marrying I m not. a maxryiiig man I have a great panshang for the girls," lie added and here he toak his cigar from his n-vutii. to sa.y it with the greater emphasis—"bitfc I cannot afford to gratify it." "Legitimately, you mean. But the married «5- ■ tate is the best estate a man can enjoy. What's your opinion sir?" asked Mr. Evans, suddenly re- ferring to Mr. Townshend. "Don't you think ai I m:ms's best fortune is a good wife?" •But the goodness of a wife," answered Mr. I Townshend. with his flickering smile, "has to be proved by marrying her. If she doesn't prove a good one, you are st'll married to her. I think you have the truth of it in the old proverb, 'A man's best fcrtt;-i(, --or his worst—is his wife.' "That's it. sir," exclaimed Struthers. "It's a! lottery; that's what it is. Marriage is a lottery." Ho uttered it with such sincerity of empha&is that you might have thought he—and he alone-had made the discovery. Mr. Evans smiled indulgently from one to the other, and, as if grateful for Townshend's expres- sion of opinon. he produced his cigar-case, "May I offer you a cigar, sir?" Townshend thanked him. but said he preferred his own cigarettes; and he wondered if there could, by any chance, be a pur- pose in thus inviting him to talk. He took note of Mr. Evans-a plump, rather handsome person, of very obvious good nature, with a well-trimmed Vandyke beard, but with a long sharp nose and small quick eyes. His consideration shifted to the other-a. red-headed, red moustached Scotsman, wita a person of the solidity of sound wood and a manner of obstinate resolution, and with feet en- ( cased in big, heavy boots that would trample and crunch their way to a desired end without regard for the ob-tructive toes it might crush on the way. "Excuse me, sir," said Mr. Evans, "but did you not appear in that burglary case that was tried to-day.' A barrister's wig disguises a man pretty; well, but I don t think there could be any mistaking you, sir." I was there." answered Townshend. "I appeared for the accused." "What made me th-nk of it," said Mr. Evans. still smiling in deprecation, "was your making that cigarette, sir. That's French, isn't it? And the man you defended is a frenchman, isn't he?" "Is he? said Townshend. "It is the first I've heai d of it." "Ile has a French name," said Mr. Evans. "French names have been in England for hun- dreds of "vI eais," answered Townshend. "Well. I thought he was a Frenchman, and I think he looks it." Townshend then took up the questioning. "You heard the case then?" "I did. And it seemed to me a very bad one," said Mr. Evans, with the severe face of a righteous mail. "How a bad one?" asked Townshend. "Bad m > itself do you mean? Or. bad as regards Lefroy." "Both." answered Mr. Evans. "I thought it was clear against him—most convincing. Did you notice that the jury were out only five minuter,? That s hews you what they thought of the evi- j denoe." "I suppose, it does," said Townshend. "AndJ I suppose they reflect the general opinion?" "I should just think they do," said Mr. Evans. "They reflect it. sir. like a looking-glass. You, sir, I suppose, believe the man Lefroy to be inno- cent?" "I do." "Of course, you defended him," said Mr. Evans, with a keen smile. "A counsel. answered Townshend. "has fre- quently to defend a man he can't believe inno- cent. of course, sir," said Mr. Evans in a voice of gentic' flatteiy, "a legal gentleman like you can seo through a fellow when he pretends to tell you everything; and perhap5 you know more, sir, than ecmes out in the evidence." Mr. Townshend walked briskly into tho opening thus offered him. t i "I have got to know this man," said he, "arid that ouiwe.ghs all the circumstantial evidence the pxosecut.oa could bring," "That s very true! said .Mr. Evans, as if he had become a convert to the belief in Lefroy's ir.nocencc—"i-n't it. Struthers? If you once be- lieve a man is all right, nothing will ever make you believe any harm of him!" "No," deelared Struthers, without compromise; "that's not true; but that's not what the gentle- man said." "You're a Scotchman!" said Mr. Evans; and so dlsm •sod the remark from serious considera- tion. "But," said he, turning again to Towns- hend, "wi.en you really think of it, that. job at the bank needed a good hand at lock-picking. If Lefroy is not an old hand, that's in his favour. Of course, the prosecution could only think of Lefroy's steel mitten being found in tho grip of tiio lock. They forgot to think that. before the steel nrttnn could be in tho grip the lock must have been prettily picked by somebody that knew how to do it." "Of course!" said Townshend, with the thought that if ho had Eeen the lock he might have urged that consideration with effect at the trial. "You seem to know all about the lock." he. added. "And whatever creature," asked Struthers, to Townshend's a-tonishment, "should know all about it if he doesn't? He's the man that sold the safe to the bank—the verra man! Mr. Evans cast a look, as of violent rebuke, upon Struthers. but lie responded quietly, "Yes; I travel m safes. Let me give you my card"- and ha produced a letter-case and handed out a card—"not necessarily for immediate use," he added. "But one day you may be a successful counsel, a'ld nerd a good safe." Townshend accepted the card without a word and read.-—'The \\aterford Ideal Safe, 415. Broadway, New York, U.S.A. Sole English Agent, Mr. Thomas Evans, 16, Goodge Street, Tottenham Court Ro-cl, London. W." "The Waterford IdeaJ is the safe in question," said Mr. Evans "but I deal '—with a grin of self- congratulation at his pun—in other safes—Mil- ner's. Chubb's, and so forth—that might suit your pocket, better." "Thank you," said Townshend. "It'll be a long time before I moeod anything of the sort, I doubt; but in the meant me I'll cherish your card." "I'll give a liberal commission," added Mr. Evans, "on any business you may send my way." There, thought Townshend, there spoke the "coalmanial gent- But he merely made answer that he would remember what Alr. Evans had been good enough to say. A few minutes later they arrived at the Red-1 bw,k iiinet. ''I tne- very station from which Lefroy had seen his wife depart. There Townshend had to change; and there apparently his travelling companions had to change also; for, after ha had faid "Good night,they followed him out of the compartment. The short October day was closing in, dId the platform lamps were not yet lighted, so that he could not see. even if he had thought of noting, where they went. He wa; inquiring of a porter where his own train was, when his late carnage companions passed in company, to his amaz- mcnt, with Tippy Haynes and his daughter. Mr. Evans walked first in earnest talk with Tippy, while benind stalked Struthers in solemn silence: with Sal. Mr.. Evans was so olosely engaged with the little white-faced man that he took no note of Townshend's curious gaze as he passed—at least, he gave no sign. Struthers. on the contrary, waved his hand in recognition. But Towushend rttalned the bright of astonishment when Sal Haynes, on seeing him, fell away from Struthers's side and utteied a quick word or two. "T'hr,t'ii him!" said she, brushing close by Townshend, and then passing on as before. But her action, evidently, was not so quick, nor her voice so low, but that they caught the atten- tion both of Strutners and the two who walked before him. At that in-tant a lamp close by sprang into flame, and illuminated the scene—Mr. Evans and Tippy Haynes standing still, with their heads turned backward notng a connection between j Haynes's daughter and Townshend, and Towns- hend himself gazing at them in surprise and un- certainty. In two seconds the scene was dissolved, They continued to move forward, while Towns- h?nd continued to stand surprised and doubtful. What did Sal Haynes s words mean? What. but that aither Evans or Struthers—which?—was the man who ought to be in the place of Lefroy ? He could not arrest either the one or the other on the suspicon, for he had no authority; but lie could follow and see where they went, and give infor- mation to the police. With Townshend, to see a thing to do was ever to do it without counting the trouble or the cost. But-as has been already pointed out—he was young then, and, although daring, he was neither so subtle in mind nor so in- genious in action as he be-m? He had h??? valise in his h.. l and he marched after the four—but some paces b"h ?.d them, so that he should not be noted as following them. They entered a third class, carriage of a train, which, was not, the train he had intended to travel by. He stopped a passing porter. "Where," he- acked "IS thIs train for?" "That's the Finborough train, sir; starts in three minutes; if you're going you'd better take your ::e,Ü, s "I say, look here, said Townshend; "run and get me a ticket, third, for Finborough, like a good fellow." And he put money into the man's hand. He had kept his eye on the third-class carriage which Evan and the rest had entered; and his purpose was to dash to the door when the train was on the point of starting, and enter boldly and as if it were Ly chante he had lighted among them. The po*ter returned, running with lis ticket. and Town h"nd handed him a tip and his valise. The whistle of the guard shrilled out. Townshend ran for the door lie had marked, and the porter fol- lowed. He flung the door open and jumped in, the porter tossed in the. valise after him and slarnni r! the door, and the train steamed away. Townshend, to his astonishment and chagrin, was alone m the carriage with Tippy Haynes's daughter! t 'i,, ca-rriago h T',ppy Hayiics's I datighter! (To be continued.)

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