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THE LATE SIR THEODORE MARTIN.

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THE LATE SIR THEODORE MARTIN. REMAINS REMOVED FROM BRYNTYSILIO: IMPRESSIVE SCENES. FUNERAL IN LONDON. The remains of the late Sir Theodore were re- moved to London on Friday for interment in the grave of the late Lady Martin. For two miles along the banks of the Dee the rOAd was lined with sympathisers, and blinds were drawn at all residences along the route. A brief service was conducted at Bryntysilio by the Rev. J. S. Jones, Llantysilio. The body, enclosed in a lead shell and coffin of massive oak, was then borne by eight ten- ants to the hearse. The coffin plate bore the inscription Sir Theodore Martin, C.B., K.C.V 0. Born September 16, 1816 died August 18, 1909." At the gates a funeral cortege of many carriages was formed. Tne mourners included Miss Saville, the Misses Elias, London, the Misses Thomas, Llantysilio, Dr. Richard Williams, Mr. Cullimore (executor), Captain Best, Mr. Dyke Dennis, Mr. Arthur Harrop, Mr. G. M. Jenkins (secretary and general manager of the Glyn Valley Tramway), Mr. Ralph Darlington. F.R.G.S., Alderman W. G. Dodd, the Mayor of Wrexham, Mr. T. C. Davies (Chairman of the Llangollen Urban District Coun- cil), Messrs. Richards, Llangollen, and many others. At Llangollen (where the funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. Edward Evans & Sons, Parade-street), the coffin was placed in a special saloon and attached to the express train, which left shortly after noon for London. Paddington was reached at 5 20 p.m. Mr. Bernard Wicks, a late partner of Sir Theodore and a number of personal friends, were present at the station to re- ceive the remains, which were accompanied on the journey by the ladies who had attended Sir Theodore in his last illness and his personal servant. The coffin was conveyed from the carriage to a hearse, and the attendants and friends took up their positions in several carriages which followed. The body lay for the night at Sir Theodore's residence in Onslow Square. The funeral took place in London, on Saturday. Shortly before noon the funeral procession set out from Sir Theodore's house in Onslow Square for St. Peter's Church, Cranley Gardens. The coffin was covered with flowers, of which so many had been sent that a second hearse was required to carry them. At the church the funeral procession was met by Canon Edgar Shepperd, Sub-Dean of the Chapels Royal, and the Rev. Henry Dann. The pall-bearers were the Poet Laureate, Mr. William Blackwood (the Edinburgh publisher), Mr. H. I Cameron, Mr. John Cullimore (Chester), Sir Archi- bald Geikie, Mr. E. H. Lloyd (Cheater), Mr. J. Murray (the London publisher), Mr E. H. Pember, K.C., Sir Richmond Ritchie, of the India Office (Thackeray's son-in-law), Sir Henry Beyer Robert- son (North Wales), and Mr. W. F. Wakeford and Mr. Bernard Wicks (Sir Theodore's partners.) The King was represented by one of his Grooms-in- Waiting, Sir John Lister Kaye. Others present included Mrs. John Murray, Mr. T. E. Kebbell, Mr. Sidney Cuthbert (British Honduras), Colonel Stanley Cuthbert (of Edinburgh), Dr. Theodore Martin Cuthbert (Newport, Shropshire), Miss Dalrymple (cousin), Mrs. Thorpe (niece of Lady Martin), Miss Saville and Miss Jean Saville, Miss Normancon (also nieces of the late Lady Martin), Lady Abercromby, Dr. Rd. Williams (Wrexham), Major Elias, Miss Eleanor Elias, Mr. Frank Hob- son, Mr. G. R. Jebb (Birmingham), Captain Best (Vivod, Llangollen), Mr. Duncan Forbes (repre- senting the family of the late Mr. J. S. Forbes), Mr. J. Nicol (City Chamberlain of Glasgow, represent- ing the corporation of that city), Mr. Dixon H. Davies (representing the directors of the Great Central Railway), Mr. 0. Hawksley (past president of the Institute of Civil Engineers),Mr. Sidney Low Mr. V. S Brassing ton (of the Shakspeare Memorial Library, Sfcratford-on-Avon), Mr. Sidney Lee (chairman of the Shakspere Birth place Trustees), Mr. W. H. Richardson (representing the Dante Society), Major General Owen Jones and Colonel Cornwallis West. The service at the Church was short and simple. In addition to the opening hymm, Abide with me," the choir sang On the Resurrection morning." The The Nuno Dimit- tis was sung at the coffin was borne out of the church. The interment took place at Brompton Cemetery. Sympathetic messages were received from Princess Christian and Princess Henry of Battenberg. PUBLIC REFERENCES. At Llantysillio Church, where Sir Theodore Martin attended on Sundays and where, up to re- cent years, he invariably read the lessons, a memorial service was held on Sunday. Appro- priate hymns were sung and, at the conclusion of the service, the Dead March from Saul" was played. In the course of his sermon the Vicar, the Rev. J. S. Jones, Rural Dean, said We are remind- ed to-day of the passing away of one who was for a number of years a fellow worshipper with us in this church. For many years he took a prominent part by reading the Lessons with much earnestness and deep religious feeling. We shall greatly miss the familiar voice and the impressive manner in which he gave utterance to the Divine Word, giving by his rendering of it often a new and a fresher interpretation to many a passage of the sacred volume. We shall mise,nim greatly on that account. We shall miss him also as an interesting personality, and as one who had high and noble ideals with regard to moral and religious duties. He was a firm supporter of religious teaching in our day schools, and was a strong believer in a national recognition of religion. In short, he was on the side of all that was highest and best both in Church and State. It is always a sad realisation when men with noble aspirations and deep conoionanesa of what is highest and best pass away from us to the spiritual world. We can ill afford to lose the presence of those who endeavour to uphold what is good and great in the traditions of our country. One after another of the great men of the Victorian era have disappeared from oar midst. Thackeray and Dickins, Tennyson and the poet Browning, who for several consecutive weeks was a worshipper in this Church, and whose life is commemorated by that tablet placed to his memory by his friend L%dy Martin. All these great men have passed away, and to-day we mourn the loss of another illustrious Victorian writer. Sir Theodore Martin died full of years and honours, and we specially regret his death here to-day because of his close connection with this neighbourhood and his warm attachment and love for this church. If we look around us we shall find certain marks of his loving care. He erected oar east window as a thank-offering for blessings received; he gave us the church organ, and in other ways helped to keep up and beautify the fabric of the church. We cannot forget also the earnest and devotional way he joined in the religious services and the heartiness with which he always sang the Psalm* aud Hymns. One other thing I should like to notioe, anJ that is the faith- fulness and constancy of his attendance at divine service while health and strength permitted. During the last year or two of his life, of course, his strength had gr atly failed, but a year or two before he seldom missed a single service during the whole time he was resident here. This, I think, should be an object lesson and a strong incentive to many among us to be more diligent and con- stant in our attendance at divine service. It we hope to attain the inheritance of Heaven here- after, of which I have spoken this morning, we must prepare for it now while opportunity is granted as, and while the means of grace are with- in our reach. ] After morning service, at Llangollen Parish Churob, on Sunday, Mr. C. Morton Bailey, Mas. Bac., F.R.C.O., played Mendelssohn's Faneral March (performed by request of the late Qaeen Victoria aft hdr funeral), and at the organ recital, after even- song, Chopin's Faneral March, played at Sir Theo- dore's funeral in London. The general meeting of the Brymbo Water Company was held at Wrexham, on Wednesday, when Mr. H. Dyke Dennis presided. The Chair- man referred to the death of their chairman, Sir Theodore Martin, and on his proposition the following resolution was carried This meeting desires to express its sense of deep regret of the loss sustained by the daath of the chairman, Sir Theodore Martin, who has been connected with the Company since its formation and occupied the position of chairman for the last fifteen years. He was always deeply interested in the welfare of the Company, and his presence and services at the meetings of the Company were highly appreciated."

5n toeinoriam.

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CYMRO. CYMRU a CHYMRAEG.