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I DOVEY FISHERY" BOARD.

BARMOUTH. I

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THE OTHER SIDE OF I DEATH.

RECRUITING IN CARNAR.VON.

THE CALL TO ARMS.I

THE GOVERNMENT AND THE RAILWAYS.

STEAMER TORPEDOED OFF I ANGLESEY.

COMFORTS FOR THE TROOPS. I

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TIRPITZ'S SON INTERNED AT…

INORTH WALES TROOPS ENTERTAINED.

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I NORTH WALES TROOPS ENTERTAINED. I HUDDERSFIELD MADRIGAL SOCIETY'S DELIGHTFUL CONCERTS. During the week-end the troops in, training at Colwyn Bay, Llandudno and Conway were entertained by the Huddersfield Glee and Madrigal Society, who gave their services gratuitously. The expenses of the visit were defrayed by the Society's large-hearted pre- sident (Mr Charles Sykes, J.P.) and the members, numbering about ninety, made their headquarters at Colwyn Bay, where they were accommodated free of charge. The arrangements locally were discharged by Mr T. E. Purdy and Mr W. Yates-Gregorv. The choir arrived on Friday afternoon, and in the evening they gave their first perform- ance at the Pier Pavilion, Llandudno, and on Saturday afternoon they sang to the troops at the Town Hall, Conway. In the evening they gave the first of a series of three enter- tainments at the Colwyn Bay Pier Pavilion. The choir received a very cordial reception from the troops at all three places. There was only one disappointing feature about the ojxining concert given by the Society at Cotwyn Bay on Saturday evening, and that unxortunately was a want of pat- ronage on the part of the troops. in whose sole interests the entertainments had been organised. South Walians. especially those drawn from Glamorganshire and Monmouth- shire, Avhcnce hail the recruits now at Colwyn Bay, are inured to choral singing of the A'ery highest British standard. Every other Vi? lagc in the two Rhondda valleys has its own highly trained mixed choir, and their per- formances are sufficiently frequent and excel- lent in character to develop in the masses a certain amount of apathy where glee society concerts are concerned. At the same time this helps them to acquire an amount of dis- crimination and musical taste not associated with their fellow-countrymen in other parts of Wales. These two facts probably help to explain why the South Wales troops did not turn up in force on Saturday night. Thev had apparently not realised the excellence of the fare provided for them, proof of which was to be found in the fact that on the fol- lowing evening their discriminating friends who did attend the first concert had so effee. tively enlightened them that they practicallv packed the building fifteen minutes before the programme was entered upon. Amongst others present were General Ivor Philipps, D.S.O., M.P. (commanding the 1st Division of the Welsh Army Corps) and Mrs Philipps, Brigadier-General Horatio Evans • and party, and a number of the chief officers of the 130th Brigade. The choir put in some delightful work under Mr C. H. Moody, whose UNOSTENTATIOUS CONDUCTING, by th.c way, was not the least pleasing feature of the entertainment, and one could only regret that there was no greater scope than in the <otn- paratively short choruses presented for an effec- tive display of their obvrous qualities. They were S2>ie:ididly balanced, but tho "basses and sopranos were the mainstay of the organisation. Md<MM has oi?p he.rd. iuijcr-bo<iicd and finer toned txxtoni bass notes from an equal number oi singens. Mr Moody had selected a most interesting and varlc-d range of choruses and selection of the- lx. performance is difficult. One of the most pleasing waa Macfarren s part-song, You sto:c my love. 'Ihis was presented unaccom- panied, and its light, playful mood and tecliriical peculiamicb were heard to the best possible  The "?? eecbion san.g "Comrades in i effect.^ (Adam) in a manner ttm.t would surprise | Arms" (A¿1.ln) in a manlier tilat would Burprjre most W<?h oho.n- i?ad?rs. For ilJost, the tempo in th-2 opening passages was infinitely quicker than Weh»h choirs usually affect, and there was little of that fire that characterises the W olth interpretation of the second verse. Still, the general effect of the performance wae re- markxbly lnlple,gi%-p. Among other selections given w't.'r-eo Failing's Song of the Vikinsrs," "The Criuskeh Lawn" (Stewart), "Hail bright alxde" (from "Tatmiiauser"], "Land of mv Fathers," "The Nightingale" (WeeJkes), and "Night hymn a.t sea"- (Ihompson) (for ladies), and the National Antlvems of the Allies. A SOLOIST'S SUCCESS. Of the soio.Ms Miss E. Cox was unquestion- ab.y the most succossiful. Her singing of Spring s Awakening" (Sanderson) was sym- pathetic and tuneful. She set some of her colleagues an example in regard to articulation, and a pleasing, modest maimer added materially^ to the charm of her work. Messrs D. R. Oxley, a,nd Harold Sykes sang pleasingly tho" Tenor and Bari,to.ne" duet. and Miss Lottie Beaumont gave Elgar's "Land of Hope and Giory" with remarkable spirit. Messrs J. Berry, M. Armitage, W. S. Beaumont, and F. Rhodes sang the "Piper's Son" quartette, and the Songs of the Fleet" (Stanford) was given by Mr F. Bell and the cho r. Mr Herbert Leeming introduced some humor- ous .items at intervals. The cillolir and Mr Moody owe much to Mr Ernest Cooper for his helpful work at the piano.

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WITH THE "PALS" AT LLANDUDNO.

I'SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' ASSOCIATION.

THE LONDON WELSH BAND'S CONCERT.…

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I - OUR LIBRARY TABLE.

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