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AMONG THE ZULUS.

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AMONG THE ZULUS. I SANATORIUM OF "OUR LADY OF GRACES." ESTCOUNT, NATAL, SOUTH AFRICA, March 17th, 1897. I spent nearly all the month of February in the district of Klip river, near Laings-Nec and Majuba Hill, two places famous in the annals of South African warfare. It was in this locality that the Boers, who are among the first marksmen in the world, scattered the English forces to the wind at the battle of Laings-Nec, and it was on the highest pinnacle of Majuba Hill that Sir George Colley was shot through the head and fell dead, as in his capacity of commander of the English forces he was urging his men to follow him; here too it was that the Boers with consummate strategy and unerring aim, showered their bullets upon the ascen- ding army, causing the unfortunate men to roll down to the bise of the hill, forming a dead pile. A few days before 1 was in Peitersmaritzburg, the chief city of Natal, and stood long and mournfully at the great marble monument which commemo- rates the last dreadful conflict between the Kaffirs and the English troops. The sides of the monument give the ghastly ac- count of the numbers of men and officers killed in several engagements the names of many are engraved and tinong them many of my own fellow-countrymen, To-day I am writing in the district of Weenen. (Weenen is a Dutch word, and means weeping or sorrowing). In the village of Weenen there is a most imposing monument frected by the Boers, in bitter remembrance of the most sanguinary and savage massacre recorded in the annals of the Zulu warfare. The history is this in a few words.—The Dutch when conquered by the English in the Cape Colony, made what was called the great Trek or departure in vast numbers into Natal, which then, in 1838, belonged to the Zulus. They wanted new territory, and they determined to apply for it to the Zulu King Dingaan, a monster of cruelty. The party set down in Weenen, while seventy horsemen, Boers, and thirty servants, proceeded as a deputation to the Royal Kraal of the king, who surrounded by his enormous body-guard of warriors received them with unbounded ceremony. The leaders of the deputation were Peiter Retief and Gert Maritz (in whose honour Peitermaritzburg is named) and signed the deed—when, lo! as the unfortunate men, one hundred in total number, were about to depart, the king gave orders to his soldiers, Kill the wizards! and in less than an hour the spears of the Zulus were dripping with the blood of the whole deputation. The Zulu king followed up this horrid slaughter by sending several thousand of his picked soldiers at once to the spot now called Weenen, where six hundred Boers were waiting their absent comrades. It was in the dead of night when all were asleep.. The slaughter was complete, only two escaped and in a few hours six hundred mangled bodies lay clotted gore. No marvel that that spot is called Weenen. May I now remark that the history of Africa since the arrival of the Dutch in 160C is in one way or another written in blood. Each page is daubed with human gore. I myself resided in the western district of the Cape Colony, from 1863 to 1875, and during that time. made a political social, and religious histol-y of the tribes of South Africa a special study. I had recourse to all the annals and chronicles that were available and I noted that every spot that was famous derived its fame from carnage. The Hot- tentots and Bushmen and Bantis or Kaffirs were the original possessors. The Dutch and Hottentots and Bushmen fought battle after battle, till the natives were nearly wiped out. Then in 1806 came the English, who fought the Boers the Dutch were conquered but treked, that is departed, this brought them in con- tact with the Zulus; then England followed under some pretense or other and so you have battles without number; one of the rivers is named Blood River from the crimson stream that mingled with ibis waters. Indeed the purple stream of blood of Hottentots. Bushmen. Boers, and English soldiers has saturated many spots of this fair land, blood all shed in the sacred name of conquest. I write these lines in no political bias, but as a traveller who notes events as he passes along. Yours faithfully, JAMES O'HAIRE.

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