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NORTH PEMBROKE AND FISHGUARD…

FUNERAL OF THE LATE MRS. .LEWIS,…

CONCERT AT THE MARKET HALL.

QUEEREST PARISH COUNCIL IN…

THE FOOTBALL FEVER.

LOCAL FOOTBALL MATCHES: I

THE LOCAL CUP TIES. I

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THE POOR LAW CONFERENCE. I

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THE POOR LAW CONFERENCE. I INTERESTING REPORT BY MR. T. I SEYMOUR. At a meeting of the Llanelly Board of Guardians held on Thursday last at the Union Workhouse, Mr. T. Seymour presiding, the Chairman gave his report on the conference of poor law guardians held in London, and said he was pleased to meet there Messrs. W. Y. Nevill and Thomas Jones. The first day there were papers read by the old man and the new man. The old man was Mr. Croppell, who came from the North of England. He read almost elaborate paper on the work of the poor law guardians, and said that years ago the work was different from what it was now. The farmers had in ancient times, in order to give employment to the poor, to engage 12 men when only five were really required. This rule was at that time compulsory. Mr. Croppel was of opinion that unless precautions were taken the old system would again beoome operative. It was also mentioned that a rector in years gone by, was forced to employ as many as 60 men and con- tribute £ 100 to the rates, as well as paying these men. He (the speaker) did not know what the rectors of the present day would say to that (laughter). The question of Guardians taking too much interest in the cases from their own district was mentioned and the old man thought it was a great mistake. He further mentioned that the Guardians were not there for charity purposes, but to use the ratepayers' money as they would their own. The new maivwas Mr. Landsbery, who had lived for some time in the East end of Lon- don. This gentleman spoke a great deal on labour, but did not say much on the poor law question. The Hon. Mrs. Littleton spoke on the way the children should be treated. She mention- ed that children were taken to a cottage home, or a barracks home. She thought that the cottage home was the better, a system that would save most in the long run. Rev. D. Davies It is not more economical but perhaps more comfortable. The Chairman (continuing) said that she did not go into that question. If people adopted children, it might do good to pay a committee of ladies to see that they were taken care of afterwards. She thought the Guurdians should have control overthe children and see that they were brought up properly. Mr. W. Y. Nevill endorsed therj remarks of the chairman, and said he had nothing further to say. Mr. Thomas Jones agreed with the chairman and referred to the children of their own vrorkhouse. He had been bold by a person that he saw the children go to school in charge of a man from the workhouse. He did not like that, nor that any difference should be made between the workhouse children and other children. The Master (in explanation) said that he had lately been forced to send a man with them to school. The man did not walk along side of them, but a respectable distance behind. The children had a tendency on Thursday to go to the market, and he had done this as a precaution against -stealiog. They were also apt to beg.from their friends on the streets, and this, no dGubt, would give the house a bad name. That was why a man had been sent with them to school. Mr. T. Jones asked if a man was sent regularly. The Master: No, not regularly. Mr. D. L. Rees proposed a vote of thanks to the chairman and the gentlemen who had been to the conference. Mr, Daniel seconded and it was carried. He said 11'; tC'iild not agree with the chairman in referenoe to the Guardians taking more interest in cases from their district. He would like the chairman to with- draw his remarks. The Chairman did not feel inclined to do so and said that it was their duty to do justice in every case that came before them. The relieving officer submitted the particulars of the cases to them and then they, as Guardians, had to; take tJlem into con- sideration. If each guardian from a district brought his own case, what was the use of a reliev- ing officer 2 The Guardians^vere (tiot in a position to judge of cases until they appeared properly brought before them. He did not accuse Mr. Daniel in any way of wrong doing in cases of this kind. Mr. J. L. Thomas agreed with the remarks of the .chairman. Mr. O. Bonville said that he tried to work with the Relieving Officer in every case from his district. Mr. W. Y. Nevill proposed that the report of the chairman be circulated among the members of the Board. Rev. D. Davies seconded anàit was carried.

A LOUGHORJDTVORCE SUIT. 1

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I TIIOSE WHO LABOUR. j —A--

MR. TOM HUGHES AND THE DEPUTY…

ODDFELLOWSHIP IN SOUTH WALES.

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THE TINPLATE TRADE .—————.—————.

THE TOWN GAS BILL.

NOVEL FRACAS AT CARMARTHEN.

ERRORS IN FOOD AND DRINK.

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