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OUR LONDON LETTER. I

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OUR LONDON LETTER. It is understood that we do not necessarily identify ourselves with our correspondent's opinions. Great sympathy will "0 out to the Duchess -of Connaught on the sad loss which she has sustained by the death of her mother, the "widowed Princess Frederick Charles of Prussia, who expired quite suddenly from heart failure. The Princess, who was a Princess of Anhalt, was born in 1837, and was married in 1854 to Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia, the bril- liant soldier who was known as tthe Red Prince in the campaign of 1870-71. Among the children of the marriage were Princess Louisa Margaret, married in 1860 to the Duke of Connaught, Prince Frederick Leopold of Prussia, Princess Elizabeth, who was married -in 1857 to the present Grand Duke of Olden- burg, and who died in 1895, and Princess Marie, who was married first to Prince Henry of the Netherlands and secondly to Prince Albert of Sachsen-Altenburg, and who died in 1888. Princess Frederick Charles, who was noted for her beauty and graceful carriage, had lived in comparative retirement since the death of her husband, but was well known to the people of Berlin, who never failed to salute her as she drove through the capital. Dublin is hoping for another Royal visit next year, when, if all goes well, the King will visit that city to open the International Ex- hibition, which is now being prepared in Her- bert Park, the gift of the Earl of Pembroke, which will be thrown open when the exhibition is over. This will be Dublin's third exhibition, the first, which was inspired by that in Hyde Park, having been held in 1853, and it was visited by Queen Victoria and the Prince Con- soilz,, who were accompanied by the young Prince of Wales. In 1861, an exhibition was organised by the Royal Dublin Society, and in z-, Y, the summer of that year the King was at the Curragh of Kildare undergoing the ordinary military training of an officer. He lived in a wooden hut and shared all the inconveniences of life in a training camp. It was while he was iatt the Curragh that he visited the exhibition. Later in the year the Queen and Prince Con- sort went over to see the exhibition and to visit the Prince of Wales at the Curragh, where they saw him go through a sham battle in a desperate rainstorm. Lady Warwick has been protesting against the publication of her letter excusing her for non-attendance at a meeting at Birmingham. She cannot think, she says, that it is the cus- tom in the Midland towns for secretaries of associations to tamper with correspondence, and awaits some explanation from the Trades Council. The Countess, too, has written another letter which has been made public. A writer on a London paper expressed the opinion that the world was getting a little tired of her vagaries, and remarked, If Lady War- wick is wise, she will keep very quiet for some time to come." But her ladyship has no inten- tion of keeping quiet. She has written to the editor of the paper that. she is booked for meetings now up till March, 1907, and that she does not intend to stop working until every working man's child is fed. Afterwards, will come secular education in all State-supported schools, the raising of the school age and a -nat.ional system of maintenance scholarships available for every child." Trade unionists are seeing to the accomplishment of this pro- gramme, and Lady Warwick is glad that the small assistance a woman can render lies in its service to the children. Now her ladyship has a little sorrow. Her favourite Pekinese spaniel, Wee Ju, is lost in London, and a re- ward of £10 is offered. Wee Ju only weighs 51b., so that a dog-stealer could have put it in his pocket. With -the approach of the date of the wed- ding of H.R.H. Princess Ena and King Alfonso, the papers—or, rather, the ladies' pages of them-have been full of the most elaborate descriptions of the many wonderful dresses which have been made for the bride, and now it is the turn of hats to be described— and also to be photographed. Large picture models have been the Princess's choice, and pale pink and blue are her favourite colours. Witlh some of the hats boas have been I ordered, one of the latter being a stole made of pink chiffon studded with little pink roses, while a parasol en suite of the most delicate pink shade is going to Madrid. There are several black hats, one of which is made of Leghorn, and is bound at the edge of the brim with black velvet. 1. Swathed round it is a white ostrich feather that actually measures forty-two inches in length,, and beneath the brim one pink rose, the Alphonse XIII., is placed. Huge feathers are evidently quite in fashion this season, for I read in the Society columns that at Kempton Park on Saturday a lady wore a hat which created quite a sensation. It was in blue, and had a huge shaded feather, which was so long that it reached over her shoulder and came right down to her waist. Great preparations are being made in Madrid for the wedding, and, as at the time of the Jubilee and Diamond Jubilee in London, the occupiers of houses which have window;, over- looking the line of route hope to reap a golden harvest. All itihe balconies along the r'üme which will be traversed by the Royal procession on the wedding day have been let. On the Calle de Alcala a grand stand with 300 seats will be reserved for English visitors, who will pay JS5 for each place. Fabulous prices are being asked by the hotel proprietors for rooms. An English family has taken a private hotel for ten days, paying £ 1,000. King Alfonso will meet Princess Ena at the frontier when she makes her entry into Spain, and this event will be accompanied by imposing ceremonies. Some of the Spanish newspapers state that Princess Henry of Battenberg will not be present at the wedding ceremony, and, though no official an- nouncement has yet been made, it is hardly likely that H.R.H. will be absent. A tremen- dous conflict is going on over the distribution of seats in the tribunes for the battle of :flowers. There will be 300 places, but applica- tions have been received for 5,000. The price for the seats had been fixed at, 200 pesetas each, tout- offers of 5,000 pesetas have been sent in. Now there ,s an idea of solving the difficulty by putting the seaits up to auction. The latest fad in the way of cures for women, and one which it is said Society women are adopting, is the silence cure." To go through this nervous patients are recom- mended to set apaiiz, one hour in the day, during which they are not to utter a single word. Beauty specialists, as well as medical men, are advocating this treatment to the woman who aspires to look young at fifty. It i8 well known that the woman with nerves talks twice as quickly as her more phlegmatic sister," said a nerve specialist. If nervous women can be induced to hold their tongues, and allow not only the body but the brain to rest for an hour a day., we shall hear less about neuralgia and nervous breakdown." S. J.

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