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.. OUR LONDON LETTER.

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OUR LONDON LETTER. It is understood that we do not necessarily identify ourselves with our correspondent's opinions, One has always to go from home to hear news, and one of the latest reports, which comes by Way of America, is that the state of the health f the Prince of Wales is anything but reassur- lng- He has, it is said "—but who says it, and ^hat their authority is, we are not told—bene- fited somewhat from the trip to India, but not Dearly as much as was expected, and "it is very hkely that he may make another Australian Voyage, leaving England in September or October, feturnieg by way of Japan and Canada, and ■ Probably visiting the United States, as his father oid." This report is supposed to have its origin *0 London, but considering that the Prince and Princess have been away for some months, and that they will be almost directly going to Spain for King Alfonso's wedding with Princess Ena, 6 and then on to Norway for the coronation of King Haakon and Queen Maud, it is not at all 6 hkely that anything of the kind will happen. People in England had all thought that the tour of the Prince and Princess had been very successful, but according to this same report it Was not a great" political success." Then it goes on to say that the hauteur of the Princess «id more harm than good. She assumed such airs' that the friendly sentiments of more than One of the native princes, whose lineage goes Centuries beyond the Great Mogul, were chilled, and generally she made little attempt to con- ciliate the people. The Prince did his best to be pleasant, but he has lost the sailor-like bluffness of his younger days. He is not robust, like his father. Indeed, none of the King's sons or daughters are physically strong. t, We shall soon be in the thick of the London season, but amongst all the parties and dances aild dinners which will be given it is doubtful iff any will come up to the one given by Lady Wimborne to meet the Prime Minister," which Will rank as one of the leading fixtures, both social and political of the year. No fewer than j 65 guests dined at five separate tables arranged 111 the three magnificent rooms which overlook the Green Park. The Red Room at Wimborne House is one of the finest apartments in London, and was built specially in the Italian style to harmonise with a superb gilded and painted ceiling brought from Rome 100 years ago. It Was in this room that the Prime Minister dined seated on the right of Lady Wimborne. The central feature of the table was a huge golden cup, the gift of 6000 workmen of the Dowlais Iron Company to Mr. Ivor Guest when he came of age, and the floral decorations was a wonder- ful arrangement of blooms entwined with the beautiful new species of foliage, the Co cos Meddelliana. For the reception which followed the dinner no fewer than 1400 invitations had been sent out. The guests entered by way of the con- servatory, where banks of yellow azaleas, helio- trope, anj hydrangea scented the air and shaded hundreds of lights, while in the corridor, which Is famous for its frescoes and contains many cabinets of exquisite china, with statues of ancestors of the family, were huge palms and jjpfisses of flowers, the whole presenting a scene like a picture from fairyland. It was in the conservatory that Wurms' famous band per- formed, and from the roof hung the most costly flowers in baskets which had been specially designed at a cost of L20 each. The new Victoria Station of the London and Brighton Company is rapidly approaching com- pletion, after being in the builders' hands for th-ree years, and will be opened for traffic on June 1. Grosvenor-road Station, which, as all travellers on both the Chatham and Brighton lines from Victoria well know, is built on the bridge over the Thames, has also been widened, and the bridge is now the widest railway bridge in the world. In the new Victoria, which has been more than doubled in size, there will be about two and a quarter miles of plat- form and nearly four miles of rails, all practi- cally under one roof. The longest platform is considerably over a quarter of a mile, and the glass roof covers an area of 400,000 square feet. A novel method of dealing with trains without the shunting delay has been invented by Mr. E. L. Morgan, chief engineer. Between every two platforms there will be three sets of rails instead of two, so that when trains arrive they will be able to move ahead into the depar- ture platforms, where they can load up afresh and leave the station by the centre road. Housekeepers will be glad to learn that it is the opinion of the Rev. Theodore Wood, the Well-known writer on natural history, that the common house-flies, which are a source of dangerous summer illnesses among children, Will be unusually scarce this year. The reason is the mild winter. Insects do not mind cold Weather. They sleep through it, and insec- tivorous birds cannot get at their victims, but ill a mild winter insects perish by millions, while the cold weather which we have been I experiencing retard the development of the survivors. Doctors are preaching a crusade against flies, which are greatly attracted by i-ailk, and it is the bacteria which they convey to it which produces so much infantile sickness. A point worth remembering is that for every fly killed now you reduce the number later by scores. The coming jubilee of Mr. Santley, the famous singer-who, by the way, spoke upon the Education Bill at the Roman Catholic demonstration at the Albert Hall—recalls the history of the famous song," Father O'Flynn," which, but for him, might never have been known. It was written by Mr. Alfred Percival Graves, son of the Bishop of Limerick, who one fine morning, walking to the Home Office from Bayswater, by way of Hyde-park, Green-park, and St. James's, found himself humming an old Irish tune, The Top of Cork Road," and at the same time thinking of Father Walsh, a genial old Kerry priest with whom he used to romp as a boy. The two remembrances proved so inspiring that when Mr. Graves got to the Home Office he was able to write down the song straight away. Nevertheless, it was several years before u Father O'Flynn became world-famous. The song was included in a little collection of Irish melodies which Mr. Graves prepared with Sir Charles Villiers Stanford, and there was some doubt as to whether it should be included at all. After a while, however, Mr. Stanley happened to glance through this collection before a concert in search of an appropriate song. The title "Father O'Flynn caught his eye. "Ah," said he, there is my song!" He sung it; it was encored five times, and has ever since lived upon the lips of men. s. J.

I 11 DEMON OF DULNESS »j

I ROSE FROM THE RANKS.

VETERAN'S DIAMOND WEDDING.I

IMARKYATE MOTOR FATALITY.I

IM.P. TAKEN ILL IN THE HOUSE.I

——— I PRINCE ARTHUR'S TOUR.…

I I THE EDUCATION BILL.

IDOCTOR LOSES AN EYE.I

I | ELECTION ANOMALIES. i…

SHOP ASSISTANTS' PROTEST.I

AMERICAN BRIDES. \

« INCORRIGIBLE."

i TO BUILD ABROAD.I

[No title]

'DEALINGS IN DOGS.

MOTHER AND CHILD POISONED.

-DEATHS OF BOAT CHILDREN.

.DOG FOLLOWS A TRAIN.

THE "PRIME MINISTER."

STATESMEN GOING CHEAP. I

KILLED AT GARDEN CITY.I

ISEA TRAGEDY SEQUEL.j

I MARCHED BACK.I

"""111i...I,,.ii,, I I THE…

ITHE KING'S RETURN.

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ROYAL WEDDING FESTIVITIES.

IDEATH OF A DEAN. I

ITO HELP COUNTY POLICE.

AGED CLERGYMAN'S DEATH.

IWHAT THEY MIGHT HAVE SAID.…

IFIRE BENEATH A HOSPITAL.…

SHOOTING AT GHOSTS.I

"DISQUIETING SIGNS."

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I NOTES ON NEWS.I

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ISCENE AT A GRAVESIDE. .

I SATISFIED WITH NOTHING

\SERIOUS FACTORY FRAUDS.

- CLOUD BURST IN CHESHIRE.

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