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CLUB WINDOW. -

STRANGE AND WONDERFUL, j

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STRANGE AND WONDERFUL, j Music from the Clock. One of the masterpieces of musical clocks has been completed for the Emperor of China, in whose palace,- 'besides pointing out the correct time, it playa selections with a fully-equipped automatic orchestra. It is pronounced) the .most joomplete musical automaton in the world, having eight divisions, each of which has a repertoire of eight melodies. All the pieces played by this musical clock were selected by the Emperor himself, and consi&t of forty foreign and twenty-four Chinese airs. Kissing among the Maoris. Prior to the introduction of missionaries and! photographers to New Zealand1, the Maori woman was practically ignorant as to the points which constituted! a 'beauty. In the old native legends the charm and graico of certain chiefs' daughters are mentioned. But beyond one or two great chiefs' daughters the women did not bother about their personal charms. Beauty in the old! days went only with high rank, and was considerably assisted by fine feathers. THE MAORI KISS. I Kissing, as we know it, brings no blush to thft maiden's cheek, nor would she thank her brave were he to greet her with the soft kiss of European fame. Nose rubbing is their form of salutation, and when two friend's meet they hold each other by their hands, ihend their heads until their noses touch, and then rub them gently from side to side. This form of greeting is not confined to the women, but is practised by the men they seldom meet without rubbing noses. Make Good Wives. In times of lamentation the Maori women will sit for hours with their noses touching, and moan for the loss of some chief whom they have in all probability never seen. The loss of a brother or friendl is enough to start them off for days, all moaning and howling piteously. They are essentially a sympathetic race, and' the sorrows of one are the sorrows of all. But in spite of these peculiarities the Maori woman is a splendid creature, and' many a white man has found' an excellent wife among them. An Interesting Craft. A number of floating playhouses may be seen on some of the rivers of Europe and America, but the largest and most novel is that known as the Mod&rn Temple of Amusement, which plies the Ohio and Illinois and-, Mississippi rivers during the summer months. This unique theatre has a seating capacity for 1,000 persons. It boasts of boxes, stalls, a pit, and an orchestra. In addition, the vessel iG sufficiently large to admit of numerous sleeping rooms for the actors, the dIe-ck hands, and all those connected A FLOATING THEATRE. j with either the show or the boat. This interest* ing craft makes a journey of 2,500 miles every summer. Th& 'boat starts at Pittsburg, and visits the towns of the, coal miners and steel workers, along the Monongahela river. Next it turns and1 goe& down the Ohio. river, and later up the. Illinois river, finally making its way to the Mississippi. The boat carries a complete electric plant, and) at night the theatre is not only brilliantly iUuminated1, but a searchlight is made to flash its beams over the surround- ing country. The theatre is well patronised. In the Depths of the Sea. Great interest is being manifested in the scientific experiments in deep-sea fishing con- ducted by Prince Albert of Monaco, who has been fexploring, the ocean with remarkable results. By means, of great nets. constructed in hexagonal iand, triangular shape the Prince has been able to capture most curious living creatures at a depth 0. two or three miles. I THE TRIANGULAR NET. Our illustration shows the great triangular net with which many of the most remarkable captures have been made hoisted out in readiness for lowering. It is very heavily framed in ordie-r to withstand the enormous pressure to which it is subjected at extreme depths. A cuttle fish was brought up from a depth of nearly a mile beneath the surface of the sea. Pulpit Made from Church Pews. A pulpit made :om the ends of "ca,st-offH pews can be seen in use at the pretty village j church of St. Andrew, Tywa<rdreath, Cornwall, I where it always attracts a-nd interests the many visitors v-ho stroll to that charming village from Fowey or neighbouring towns. The church, which was. built in 1347, underwent a renovation some years ago, so far as its internal fittings were concerned. The old pews were splendidly carved! at the ends, and when they were discarded for more modern pews it was felt it would be a pity if this excellent carving was lost or destroyed'. So a capable carpenter set to work, and! he actually made the present pulpit and lectern at Tywardreath Church from the disused' ends of those old pews!

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DEATH OF LORI) iaTOHlE. I

BURIED IN AVALANCHES. I

SOMNAMBULIST COMMITS SUICIDE.…

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IFAMOUS ANIMAL PAINTER. ,I

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I COUNTRY NOTES.

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POSTMAN HONOURED BY THE KING.

ISUICIDE IN COURT.

DOG AND CAT SLAUGHTER |

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POPULAR SCIENCE.

I RUSSIA'S TROUBLES. I

FRANCE AND GERMANY. )

I RUN TO EARTH! I