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THE CEIM ERALELECTIOIM. ..

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THE CEIM ERALELECTIOIM. PROGRESS OF THE CAMPAIGN. j N agn I The King held! a Council on Mondlay after- noon at Buckingham Palace, at which Hia Majesty signed a proclamation dissolving the present Parliament, and ordering writs to be issued for the summoning of a new Parliament which will meet for the despatch of business on Tuesday, February 13. Another proclama- tion directs the peers of Scotland to meet in Edinburgh on January 30 to elect the sixteen peers to represent them in the ensuing Pari'a- meat. MR. CHAMBERLAIN AT BIRMINGHAM. Mr. Chamberlain, speaking in East Birming- Siam on Saturday night in support of Sir Ben- jamin Stone's candidature, said that, 116 to the question of Home Rule, he disliked the idea of a British Government which was absolutely rundier the control of the enemies of the country. All the members of the present Ministry had avowed their adherence to the Home Rule prin- ciptes of Mr. Gladstone, and, having done that, they were trying to deceive the electors by say- 4ag that Home Rule was a bogey. The distress from which the country was suffering was due practically to one thing only—want of employ- rnent. The only remedy was in new and in- creased markets, and for these markets all the other nations were fighting us, not with arms, 'but with tariffs. He and those who agreed with him were tired of this state of things, and, if the -workin- men would give them a mandate, they would put a stop to it. The protection of labour was just as much opposed to free trade as the protection of goods, and he ought to have the support of every trade unionist. After insisting that pauperism was much greater than it was fen, twenty, or, he fancied, thirty years ago, Mx. Chamberlain concluded by reiterating that, as long as they had a system of free imports, they could not hope for any change in the situa- tion as regarded unemployment. ua MR. HARCOURT AT BURY. Mr. L. V. Haroourt, First CommaTissioner of twiorks-, addreised a joint meeting of Bury and iBeywood Liberals at Bury Hippodrome on Saturday afternoon. He said the long-delayed tend greatly-desired dimoluibi»rt was at hand, and Ifehe method of the Tory Government's going was iworthy of the rest of their proceedings; de- spised by their opponents, frightened by their own friends, they sneaked out of their resfponsi- fbdlitieB 'like an absconding bankrupt with the .police upon his track. Mr. Balfour said the jpolicy of the Unionist party was a policy of pre- ference for I;he Colonies and retaliation, which Mr. Chamberlain pointed out must mean a general and necessarily a protective tariff. Why did not Mr. Balfour resign after he was de- feated in July, or dissolve in the early autumn tarnd Invite the verdict of the country in order Itohafc the Government's successors might have tetiitered upon the work of revising the esttiimiates of each Department, which was now impossible? lair. WYNDHAM AT DOVER. Mr. Wyndham, M.P., speaking ait Dover on BaJtmrday night, criticised speeches made by Mr. Ealdane, Mr. Asquitih, and Sir Edward Grey. fie said these three statesman enabled the pre- sent Cabinet to be brought into exmstence. If they had stood out the Liberal party would not now have been in power. The danger was that ifchese men being in the Cabinet might soothe fthe electors' anxieties and make them believe JGhiat, afiter all, a change of Government did not teoiatter, as they were cooing like turtle doves to tihe very mibemeeltis Sir Henry CamipbeM-Banner- I fiffiian had fluttered. Buit, coo these gentlemen tever eo softly, the return of the Lilberla.1 Govern- ment would mean that not only would the fecal fitsBu be burked, but the tyranny foreshadowed gn the Prima Minister's speech at the Albert jBaM would be enforced by the votes of Homw sRuleite and those in favour of tihe dlaesfcablieh- Snenifc of tihe Church. Political speeches were aflisio delivered on Caiturday night by Sir G. Parker at Gravasend, And Mr. Lough at West Islington. i MR. J. MORLEY AND UNEMPLOYED, I f Mr. John Morley, replying on Saturday at Arbroath to a deputation of representatives of She Labour and Socialist parties, pointed out jfchat a proposal to supplement the rates by Exchequer grants to provide work for the unemployed meant simply taking money out of fche ratepayer's pocket. Labour was, no doubt, jone essential to the production of wealth, bat fit was not the only essential; capital was (equally necessary. If, as he had gathered from brhat they said, the deipufation really meant that ffche State was bound to provide work at a (Standard wage for every man for whom private janterprise failed to furnish it, he ventured' to fell them that he thought that an unsound and pangerous proposition. 1 WHAT MR. CHURCHILL SAYS. r Mr. Churchill, speaking at Accrington on {Saturday night, re.markedi that Mr. Chamberlain proposed to find work for 300,000 people by shutting out foreign goods, and at the same ttime to raise twelve millions a year by taxes on Ifche goods shut out. I MR. BURNS IN BATTER SEA. j £ Mr. John Burns, speaking at Battersea on Saturday night, dealt with the subjects of /Chinese labour and fiscal policy. :hinese la;bourand fis-cal policy. ? MR. BIRRELL ON EDUCATION. I f Speakings .in Bristol on Saturday night, Mr. jiBirrell said he desired to see in all schools pimple religious Christian teaching, simple elementary Christian Bible New Testament beaching. One had to be very careful to use jail right words in view of recent criticism. He fewas anxious* not to divorce education from the ffieligious feelings of the people, and was willing po give facilities for denominational teachings— pot at the expense of the ratepayers on school premises, where they were satisfied it was the Pwish of the parents-attenruance not to be com- pulsory. He did not want to separate secular Mucatton altogether from the religious instincts pi the people. j ISIR H. FOWLER AT WOLVERHAMPTON. I II Addressing a meeting at Wolverhampton, oa ,saturday evening, Sir Henry Fowler said Mr. jChamberlain'a policy was founded on the theory jjthat the state of trade in this country was decreasing in a rapid! manner. Political (students were interested in the speeches pelivered bv Mr. Chamberlain between 1880 and *1885, and now they could quote Mr. Chamber- lain on both sides. Those who were protec- tionists could quote what the Birmingham statesman had been saying in the last few ths, and those who were free-traders could quote what he said twenty ye,ars ago. Mr. IChainberlain was then enjoying the ib-enefits of fcree* trade. Peace was the greatest British {interest. During the past ten years social legislation, the reforming legisla,tion of the tcountry, had' been at a standstill. The late arliament, bad done lees and wasted more time Wla,n any Parliament in the last 200 years. MR. BALFOUR'S TWO MEETINGS. I Mr. Balfour addressed two meetings in East Manchester on Monday night. At the first he Slealt at length with the question of Chinese labour, declaring that no greater crime had been committed by the members of the present Government than the pretensions they madle on ithis subject, and that they did not intend to Salter the existing system, because they dare not,, At tbe second meeting, Mr. Balfour 58iw that ^Unquestionably the price to be paid by the ^Government for Irish support was something in respect of the government of Ireland which Should be a step In the direction of Mr. Glad- ¡'. stone's Bill. In regard to the fiscal question, fcis doctrine was not that of protection, or of Imposing duties to bolster up manufactures wAich were dyfng;- but lie did complain that we were not using; our power of influencing the commercial legislation of other and competing countries. I MR. CHAMBERLAIN'S REMEDY. I Mr. Chamberlain, in a speech in support of the Unionist candidate at Wednaabury on Monday night, dewltchiefly with the unemploy- ment problem, which, he said, arose from foreign competition. The only effective remedy was to compel the foreigner to treat our trade fairly by taxing hie. products. I WHAT MR. ASQUITH SAYS. Mr. Asquith, speaking on Monday night at Huddersfield, said that if time were given them, the Government would amend the Trades Disputes Bill and extend the Workmen's Com- pensation Act. Protection was no panarcea. for unemployment. Education first, and then temperance and land reform, and. public economy would be dealt with by the new Government &a remedies for poverty and un- employment. LORD LANSDOWNE AT MANCHESTER. Lord: Lansdowne, addressing a mass meeting 11 9 of Unionists at the Free Trade Hall, Man- chester, on Monday night, held that the late Premier was justified in resigning when he did, and said that there were really three issues to be decided) at the coming election—whether the electorate preferred the promises of the new to the performances of the late Government; whther they were satisfied with the views of the Cabinet on Home Rule; and, finally, which of the two views of the fiscal question was the more reasonable. MR. MORLEY AT MONTROSE. Mr. John Morley, speaking on Monday night at Montrose, dealt with the fiscal ques- tion, and ask-ed if the case for change had been made out. Was the remedy clearly defined? Was the how, when, and where of the remedy clearly defined? He contended that not one of these conditions had been complied with, and that no case had been made out for the tremendous revolution proposed. MR. BRYCE AT ABERDEEN. ] Mr. Bryce, addressing the electors of South Aberdeen on Monday night, in criticising the present Opposition, said the late Government had gone round the corner and was now throw- ing stones to break windows of the house occu- pied by its successor. He declared that fiscal reform was introduced by one who had done more to injure the Colonies and the Empire than anyone in our time. In regard to the aim and character of Irish policy, Mr. Bryce siaid they must give the people trust in the Government which administers the law. MR. ARNOLD-FORSTER SHOUTED DOWN. A meeting held on Monday night at Thornton Heath, in support of the candidature of Mr. Arnold-Forster, was of a riccouschaxacter. Mr. Forster complained of the intentional and per- sistent interruption of an organised body of Liberal 'opponents, but for an hour stood his ground, amid great uproar and confusion. He pointed out that Mr. Lloyd-George was given a perfectly fair hearing in that constituency. I SIR CHARLES DILKE. I Sir Charles Dilbe, on Monday night, addres- j sing a meeting in Caxton Hall, Westminster, in support of the candidature of Captain Hobart, said he regarded the composition of the Govern- ment, in respect of the principal places, as ex- cellent and admirable. 11: I SIR EDWARD STRACHEY'S THREAT. T Sir Edward Strachey, Comptroller of the Household, addressing a meeting in South Somerset on Monday evening, declared that if the Liberal Government introduced a Rule Bill he would at once resign his post. MR. BURNS AND MR. CHAMBERLAIN. Mr. John Burns, addressing a meeting at Derby on Monday night, said Mr. Chamberlain went further than Jack Cade, and. outstripped all the political bribers from Cade to Mr. Jesse Collings. Mr. Chamberlain had said that one million able-bodied men were in our workhouses, whereas the number was only 214,000, and out of that number onlv 7,615 were able-bodied men. Add to these 2,200 in Ireland and 2,000 in Scot- land, and they would find Mr. Chamberlain" to be 990,000 wrong in a million, THE PREMIER AT LIVERPOOL. ) Sir H. Campbell-Bannerman, addressing a great meeting at Liverpool on Tuesday night said all the organised forces of privilege were against them, but with the public sense of right on their side they would win. Their opponents were making a desperate attempt to conduct the .struggle on a. grand organised system of false alarms, and to turn a real fight into a sham one. The issue at this election was not any Irish, Scotch, or Welsh question, but the question of free trade. Mr. Balfour's charge against the Mbe-rals of weakening the defences of the Em- pire was baseless. He looked to settled and pacific policy and mutual acknowledgment of superfluous. armaments to render reduction pos- sible. In regard to the question of Chinese labour, he regretted that the Government could not stop the importation of coolies for whom licenses had been issued before they took office. Although at the end of last October Mr. Lvttel- ton had advised the mineowners to stop the im- portation of coolies, yet 13,000 fresh licenses were suddenly issued early in November. This remarkable incident would require elucidation. Sir Henry, in conclusion, dealt with the fiscal, question. There were some lively scenes owing to the interruption of a number of women who de- manded to know whether the Premier was in favour of Women's Suffrage. The interrupters were promptly dealt with, and seven women in all were ejected. MR. BALFOUR AT MANCHESTER. I Mr. Balfour on Tuesday night addressed two meetings in East Manchester, setting forth his views on Chinese labour, the fiscal problem, and other prominent questions. I MR. ASQUITH ON PROTECTION. i Mr. Asquith, speaking at Stockton-on-Tee& on Tuesday night, said protection was the resur- rection of a twenty years old corpse. Mr. Chamberlain was the cuckoo who had taken the eggs laid by Lord Randolph Churchill in his callowest days. WHAT MR. HALDANE SAYS. I Mr. Haldane, Secretary for War, speaking on Tuesday night at Prestonpans, referred to the peculiar difficulties of Army reorganisation, and. while crediting Mr. Chamberlain with public spirit and honourable motives in his advocacy of a reversal of our fiscal policy, held that such a course* would be attended with results exactly opposite to those which Mr. Chamberlain sought to attain. MR. J. MORLEY. I Mr. John Morley, continuing his electoral campaign on Tuesday night at Bervie, devoted himself mainly to the discussion of the fiscal question. I OTHER SPEAKERS. 1 Political speeches were also delivered on Tuesday by Mr. Churchill at Manchester. Mr. Lloyd-George at Middlesbrough, Mr. Bryce at Aberdeen, Mr. A. Gibbs and Sir E. Clarke; K.C., in the City, and others.

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