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-c CURRENT SPORT.I

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-c CURRENT SPORT. I LANCASHIRE v. AN ENGLAND ELEVEN. At. Blackpool on Saturday Lancashire were cnly prevented irorn beating the England Eleven lor the want of one more over. One minute from time ,they,w,a.nited only one run, but Cook, in trying to untake ithe winning hit, was caught in the long field, and as there was no time for the next man to go in the match ended in a draw. Set 169 to get to win in a couple of hours, Lancashire at firat eeemed certain to be Jjealten. Garnett, Mac- Laren Poidevin, and Tyldeeley were all out for 25 runs. However, Hallows, Higson, Ilarry, and Cook hit out with tsuch vigour that the for- tunes of the game were completely changed. Hal- lows hittwOt)'B, and Harry, who reached 50 in three-quarters of an hour, made three. FRY STILL IN FORM. Thapke. to another good innings by Fry, who has reached or exceeded the half-century in each of his last four innings, at Hove, Sussex were able to declare on Saturday, leaving Essex 255 to get to win in two ihournand three-quarters. The Essex innings needs no description, beyond one of Reeves' splendid innings. Going in fo'urltih wicket down, he scored 62 out of 71 rune added while he was, in, hitting 10 fours. It was shout the best forcing display seen at Hove this season. Two other members of the, defeated team reached 6 runs, the next highest score to Reeves The mantle of Somereet has, indeed fallen on Eases the only county to defeat the Australians, and the only county 'to make Yorkethire follow-on when almost at full strength, and at the top of their 'form they were dismissed for 91 runs by Sussex. KENT v. SUUREY. For the second time in the meetings of Kent and Surrey they managed to tie at the Oval on Saturday, the first occasion being in. 1847, also on the Keimington enclosure. Considering that Surrey were, soon after the resumption, within 27 of a victory over Kent, with still six wickets to fell, the fact of the match ending in a tie shows .the exciting nature, of the closing stages. THE AUSTRALIAN TOM. Cricket historians very nearly had the pleasure of recording two tie matches on one and the same afternoon on Saturday last. At Bournemouth Hargreave bowled so well in the se- cond innings of the Australians—lie took six wickets for 76, and altogether ten for 150 in the matoh-that the match with the All- Englaind Eleven was a tie when kthe ninth wicket fell. The required run came from an "extra," and the Australians won with their last wicket intact. During the day's play some fine hitting by Cotter was the chief feature. Twice he hit Hargreave over the ropes—six being rightly scored for each stroke, as it is in all matches in which W. G. Grace takes part, unless the opposing captain is very obdurate—and Hopkins also forced the pace while he was in. Har- greave* has been bowling during the past four or five weeks in something more like his true form-- that is to say, like one of the best slow left- handers in the world. UNSATISFACTORY FOR ESSEX. With their defeat at Brighton on Saturday the ISesex eleven brought to a close an unsatisfactory reason as far as inter-county matches are con- cerned. Their record is identical with that of the preceding year, but they rejoice in the dis- tinction of being the only county to beat the present Australian team, a victory that will amply compensate them for their many failures. The -reason for the poor results achieved is not far to .seek. On hard wickets their bowling by no means compared unfavourably with that of anost other counties, but they had no one who could be really icffoctivo on pitches affected by rain., A bowler of the stamp of Walter Mead would 1uwebeen simply invaluable to them. For a long time the batting strength of the side was gadly weakened by the repeated failures, of Perrm, and it was not until the Bummer was half over that their great hate man ran into form. BRILLIANT SEASON FOR SUSSEX. Not since the institution of the championship in 1873 have Sussex had such a, brilliant season as the one which they brought to an end on Saturday with a. victory over Essex. Their best Tears prior to the present one were 1899 and 1901, in each of which they won eight matches. Fry was, of course, the miainstay in batting, and .played seven innings of 100 and over for the county hut the wonderful success met with was in the 'main due to the support given to Fry by Vine and the splendid all-round work of Cox, Relf and Killick. Altogether it was a season Tipon which the eleven will be alble to look back with pride. KENT'S PERFORMANCES. Though winning as many matches, viz., t,en, Kent have not enjoyed quite as successful a eeason as in 1904, seven defeats as against four 'being sustained, and, as a consequence, have re- ceded from the third -to the sixth place in the championship taible. Their most notable win was that gained at Hull on the last day in June, when, thanks to some admirable bowling by Ely the and two innings of 50 by A. P. Day, tihey (beat the present champions by six wickets on a pitch affected by rain. Day, like R. A. Young, of Repton, had the satisfaction of scoring over a thousand runs in his first summer in important cricket. Playing regularly, Dillon lias at length (succeeded in realising the expectations formed of Ilixn when, at Rugby. Since F. G. J. Ford gave urn first-class cricket there has been no left- handed batsman possessed of such splendid hit- ting powers. BATTING AVERAGES. Although the first-class cricket season has an- other week or ten days to run, nothing—short of very phenomenal scoring by Hirst or Quaife— can deprive C. B. Fry of the honour of once again occupying premier position in run-getting, (both in the matter of aggregate and average. Superlatives have almost lost their value when it comes to describing the deeds of this the greatest run-getter since the palmy days of W. G. Grace. At any raite, they hav«^b&mi ex- hausted. He has eclipsed himself tllit3 season, though actually at present 370 rune short of his aggregate in 1901. With five fewer innings than Hirst, seven fewer than Quaife, 12 iwmr than Denton. 17 fewer than Hayward, tlwws tonv pro- fessionals being the only other to score over 2000 runs, Fry leads each of tiihera » consider- able distance. Hirst is second, wjiS* 18 runs per innings less than Fry in the master of aver- age, and Hayward second, with 499 fewer runs, in the'matter of aggregate. YORKSHIRE HEADS THE BOWLING. Haigh still heads the bowling averages, and his nearest attendants, Thompson and Rhodes, must bowl exceptionally well during tshe next fortnight to depose him. Lees, wiiiih 182, by a wicket ia at the head of affairs in (the matter of wickets taken and with four matches hftfore him should take ^00 wickets for the fins*, tiia* in his career. Brearley, who is again said to be retiring from first-class cricket, is second, with 181, for a couple of rune more per wicket than Lees has re- corded against him. FOOTBALL SEASON. On Saturday, under Association rules, most of the important clubs, opened /the football season. The weather was generally fine, and large crowds witnessed the games. In the Foot- hall and Southern -Leagues, all the clubs were engaged, and m most cases the results of the matches were m accordance with expectations. e W1 ) expee a lOllS. FIRST BLOOD IN THE LEAGUE In the Senior Division of the Football League, the champions, Newcastle 'United,, met witll dc- feat at Sunde~land, but the' fflish Cup winners, Aston V ilia were able to Lure one point as the result of a draw, at Blackburn Bolton and Bury were defeated on their own grounds by Sheffield United and Derby County respectively, but with the exception of a drawn re, pame at Small Heath, the home teams wero victorious. In the Second Division, the new clubs, Clapton Orient and Chelsea, were both he ate'n on their opponents' grounds, both, how- ever, showing excellent form. SOITTHI5JR.^ LEAGUE. In tfe Southern League none of the London olubs were beaten, the best performance being that of Brentford, who won at SouthamDton. The new club, Norwich City, went down by two goals, at Plymouth. LAWN TENNIS. CHICHESTER OEEN TOURNAMENT. This meeting was concluded on Saturday in dull weather. The final round of the gentle- men's singles did not produce a contest, E. R. Allen receiving a walk-over from his brother. The Allen's won the gentlemen's doubles, and Miss Booth by gained an easy win. in the ladies' singles. Partneredby A. D. Prebble, Miss Boothby was also successful in the mixed doubles. BILLIARDS. J. ROBERTS V. F. BATEMAN. This match of 9,000 up, in which Bateman receives a start of 2,750 points, terminated at Dublin on Saturday night, Roberts winning by 589 points. The only breaks of importance during the afternoon and evening sessions were 87, 77, and 159 by Roberts, and 65 by Bateman. The final scores were Roberts, 9,000; Bate- man (rec. 2,750), 8,411. MOTORING. Eight starters took part in the Auto-cycle Club's Consumption Trial, which was held over a 57 miles' course, from Thames Ditton to Hind- head, and back, on Saturday. The event re- sulted in a win for H. J. Den sham, on a 2-1-h.p. Minerva, the amount of petrol consumed being only 77oz. E. W. Goslett, 3-h.p. N.S.U., was second, with a record of 84oz. The next lowest consumption was 88oz., by C. G. Thiselton, 2f-h.p. Bat, but, on taking into account the combined weight of the bicycles and riders, this machine was placed fourth. Third place was taken by the 3^-h.p. Rex, driven by W. H. Hayes, which consumed 91oz. AUSTRALIANS AT LEYTON. In the match between the Australians and Essex at I,.eyton,. on Monday, each side com- pleted an innings, the Australians scoring 156 and Essex 107, while in their second innings the Australians had neither lost a wicket nor scored a run at the close of play. At the Oval Surrey obtained 120 for one wicket, against 164 by Leicestershire. At Bournemouth Players of the South made 354 for seven wickets against the Gentlemen; and in-the North and South match, with which the Scarborough Festival opened, the team first named compiled the fine total of 418. SOUTHERN LEAGUE FOOTBALL. s In Southern League football matches, on Monday, Portsmouth drew at Watford, snd Plymouth Argyle and' Luton shared poi-its at Luton. Tottenham Hotspur beat Reading by five goals to one in a Western League ma'cn, and in the same competition Queen's Park Rangers won at Brentford. Chelsea scored a. brilliant win over Liverpool, but Clapton Orient performed moderately against Derby County.

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