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THE WAR

WEATHER WISDOM. I

THE PRINCESS AND THE ROSES.I

JOHN O' GAUNT'S CASTLE.

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KENSAL RIS £ HORROR. I

THE FORTRESS OF VLADIVOSTOCK.…

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I HEALTH UTTERLY BROKEN. I

I A PIGEON TALE.

I SOLDIER AND NURSE.

GASTRIC CATARRH AND INDIGESTION.

— II A COMIC CONSPIRACY.

I-I I ANOTHER FLOATING EXHIBITION.

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PUBLIC MEN ON PUBLIC MATTERS.

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PUBLIC MEN ON PUBLIC MATTERS. MR. CHAMBERLAIN AND THE FISCAL AGITATION. There was a large gathering of tariff reform members of Parliament in the Grand Committee Room of the House of Commons on the 13th inst. under the presidency of Mr. Chamberlain. The right hon. gentleman spoke at length in explanation of his views on the tariff question, and pointed out that the two wings of the Unionist Party were, with certain exceptions, practically at one on the fiscal question. A deputation was appointed to wait upon the Prime Minister to arrange a modus vivendi. The numerical position of the various sections of the Unionist Party is at present said to be as follows: Supporters of Mr. Chamberlain's Glasgow policy, 172, Sympathisers with Mr. Chamberlain, but supporters of Mr. Balfour in any event, 73. Simple retaliationists, 98; free traders, 27. In addition, four Unionists are classed as Cobdenites andprepared to sacrifice everything for free trade. THE PREMIER ON TARIFFS. The Prime Minister writes as follows to the editor of the Yorkshire Herald with regard to the action of Reckitt and Sons (Limited) in trans- ferring part of their manufactory to the United States in order to overcome the American tariffs I am much obliged to you for your letter and its enclosures. It really is beyond argument that tariffs which withdraw capital and plant from this country do it a serious injury. The fact that the same tariffs may also injure the country which imposes them may be true, but is not to the point. —I remain, yours faithfully," ARTHUR JAMES BALFOUR.' BRITISH COTTON-GROWING. The Duke of Marlborough spoke at Bolton on the 13th inst. in support of the British Empire Cotton-Growing Association. He advocated action which would make Lancashire independent of the American supply, and said there were sufficient cotton-growing fields in British Crown Colonies to achieve this independence. Replying to a vote of thanks, he hinted that if an association from Lancashire went to the Chancellor of the Exchequer and informed him that they were pre- pared to spend from three hundred thousand to four hundred thousand pounds in cultivating cotton in Northern Nigeria, provided the Govern- ment spent one or two million pounds upon a rail- way, the Chancellor would not receive their advances unfavourably. LORD ROSEBERY ON HOME RULE. Lord Rosebery, presiding at the annual dinner of the Liberal League in London on the 13th inst., urged that, whatever the Irish policy of the next Liberal Government might be, it could not be too explicit or too clear. He hoped and be- lieved that the leaders of the Opposition, at what time and in what manner they should think fit, would state broadly and clearly the main features of their policy for Ireland-both what they hoped to do and also what they expected not to be able to do. His own belief was that their policy towards Ireland would be one that he would be able to support. He believed that it should be to apply justice, and generous justice, to Ireland without hope of gratitude and without expectation of immediate results. In regard to the attitude of the House of Lords towards Liberal legislation, he anticipated that after the first year of the new Government it would be as aggressively and offen- sively Tory as it had ever been in the past. I UNIONIST DEPUTATION TO MR. I BALFOUR. The Prime Minister received in his official residence at Downing-street, on the 14th inst., the influential deputation, headed by Mr. Cham- berlain, which was appointed by the previous day's large mele,ting of members of the House of Commons favourable to fiscal reform. The interview was private, and no official com- munication as to what passed was furnished to the Press; but, according to the Press Association, although the proceedings are understood to have been of a most friendly and satisfactory character, no definite or finai decision was announced. The statement of views upon the fiscal ques- tion which was agreed to at the preceding day's private meeting in the House, of Commons Committee-room, was read by Mr. Chamberlain, who, in handing it to Mr. Balfour, made a few explanatory remarks. Several other members of the disputation addled explanations and com- ments by way of (making clear their own position upon the question and the undiminished friend- liness of their attitude towards the Govern- ment. A general conversation followed, in the course of which the Prime Minister was informed that the, deputation bad no desire whatever to press for any immediate answer upon the points they had submitted for his consideration. Mr. Balfour is accordingly taking time to consider the matter, and will in due course reply. Meantime no arrangements are made for any further interview or conference, although when the Prime Minister's answer is received another meeting of the Fiscal Reform members of the House of Commons may be convened in order that its purport may be communicated to them. The following gentLemen formed' the deputa- tion:—Mr. Chamberlain, Mr. Halsey, Mr. Chaplin, Sir Herbert Maxwell, Sir A. Hender- son, Mr. Whitmore, Mr. Goulding, Mr. Baldwin, Mr. A. P. Stanley, Sir Howard Vincent, Viscount Morpeth, Mr. Parker Smith, I Sir F. Banbury, Sir Gilbert Parker, Mr. Boscawen, and Mr. Pike Pease. The conference, lasted) exactly an hour and a quarter. I LETTER FROM MR. CHAMBERLAIN. Mr. Chamberlain writes as follows:- "Meeting of Tariff Reformers, "House of Commons, "April 14, 1905. "Sir,—I ask your permission to say that while none of the unofficial accounts that I have yet seen of the proceedings and conclusions of the private meeting of yesterday are correct in all particulars, most of them are entirely inaccurate. I ea,rnestly hope, therefore, that all members of the Unionist party, whether in or out of Parliament, will reserve their judgment until it is possible to publish full details. Mean- time the only thing I can state is that the spirit of the meeting was excellent, and most friendly to the Prime Minister and his Government-- I am, sir, your obedient servant, "J. CHAMBERLAIN." I THE WAR SECRETARY ON UNITY. Speaking on the 14th inst., at Thornton Heath, Mr. H. O. Arnold-Forster, War Secre- tary, referred to the growing disposition towards unity in the Unionist party. He could not help feeling, he said, that they were on the eve of a situation which would make it possible for every member of that party to go hand in hand to the polls as united and agreed in their political faith as was the case five or ten years ago. T'hat was the consummation he was con- fidient could be reached by a littLe goodwill, comprehension, .and understanding among the various elements composing the party. He anticipated all causes of difference being then obliterated, and that they would go to the polls with a unity and assurance which would double their fighting strength.

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I"THE LAWS DELAY." I

A FORTUNE FROM MARRIAGE ANNOUNCEMENTS.

IMR. ROOSEVELT'S HOLIDAY.

BLOOD SPITTING AND WEAK LUNGS.

J . DISPUTE OVER OLD BONES.

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A PRINCESS'S SARCOPHAGUS.

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----A PRISON MARRIAGE.

RAT-RIDDEJN ISLAND.

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I"WIRELESS" PUZZLE.

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