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THE WAR

WEATHER WISDOM. I

THE PRINCESS AND THE ROSES.I

JOHN O' GAUNT'S CASTLE.

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KENSAL RIS £ HORROR. I

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KENSAL RIS £ HORROR. I A STARTLING STORY. I The bodiee of a mother and her twin children were (according to the "Times") discovered on Thursday of last week in a tin box, carefully sealed, wnich for mote than a month past had been stored in Messrs. Bannister's warehouse, Buller-road, Kensal-rise. It appears (continues the account) that Messrs. Bannister were called upon early in February by a young man, who gave the name of Arthur Devereux, and who at the time was living with his wife and children in Milton- avenue, Stonebridge-park, and he explained that he had sold most of his belongings, and that he required a large box to store away chemicals and other things. Messrs. Bannister agreed to lend the box, which Devereux took away with him, and afterwards he brought it back to the warehouse. No suspicions' that anything was wrong were entertained until a Mrs. Gregory, mother-in-law to Devereux, became alarmed at the sudden cessation of visits'from her daughter. Knowing that a trunk had been deposited at the warehouse, Mrs. Gregory communicated with the police, and inquiries were immediately made. Messrs. Bannister were called upon and the box was submitted for inspection, with the result that the bodies of the missing woman and her children were found packed away in it. Devereux had made it known that he was pro- ceeding to Coventry, where, being a fully-quali- fied chemist, he obtained a situation at a chemist's shop. Inspector Pollard, who has had charge of the ca-se, communicated with the police at Coventry, and the man was arrested on Thursday night of last week. The prisoner was afterwards conveyed from Coventry to London under police escort. When the discovery of the bodies was made, Dr. Robinson, divisional sur- geon, was called to the warehouse, and he ordered the removal of the box and its contents to the Kilburn mortuary. On examination he formed the opinion that death had been brought about by poison. On the morning following, under his personal direction, a post mortem examination was begun. The bodies were not decomposed, thus showing how carefully the box had been sealed in order to make it air-tight. DEVEREUX CHARGED WITH THE MURDER. The prisoner arrived at Willesden shortly be- fore three o'clock on Friday afternoon in charge of Inspector Pollard and Sergeant Cole, and was conveyed to Harlesden Police-station, where he was charged with murdering his wife, Beatrice Devereux, and his twin children, Eve- lyn Lancelot and Lawrence Roland, aged twenty months. WHAT THE POLICE FOUND. Inspector Pollard said that in company with Sergeants Gill, Tritton, and Cole, he entered the lofts of Messrs. Bannisters' furniture ware- house, Buller-road, Kensal-rise, where he saw a large tin trunk strongly bound with a strap, pad- locked, and doubly sealed with red wax. In his inquiries he had ascertained that the prisoner when warehousing it had stated that it contained chemicals and books. Finding no vibration on shaking the box, be directed Sergeant Cole and other police officers to cut the seals and undo it. Sergeant Cole unlocked the padlock. On lift- ing the lid he found another covering, consist- ing of wood tightly fitted, cross-barred, and rimmed with pieces of wood screwed down in section with 16 screws. It was apparently glued and then sized, and a chemical of some sort was used to preserve the polish. They unscrewed the wood and forced a portion. Under this they found glued strongly together a covering con- sisting of a table cloth and a bed quilt with some other substance. On lifting that he found a child's bead. He immediately sent for the coroner's officer and the divisional surgeon, and the box was taken to the Kilburn Mortuary, where the whole of the wood, the table cloth, and) the quilt were removed. They then found the dead body of a woman and the bodies of the twin children, aged twenty months. In conse- quence of the doctor's statement he communi- cated with the Coventry police, and proceeded there. He saw the prisoner at the police-sta- tion, Coventry, and, After cautioning him, he charged him. He told him they were police officers and that they had been making inquiries respecting his wife and children—Evelyn Lance- lot and Lawrence Roland. He further said he had found that he sold his wife's and children's clothing to a person in Harlesden, who will be called asi a witness, and also that the bodies of the three had been found in a tin box, and that Dr. Robinson, divisional surgeon, had seen them, but was unable to certify the cause of death until he had made a post mortem, although he had formed the opinion that the deaths were by poisoning. The prisoner replied, "Very well, I wish to make a statement, but I will do so later." On his arrival at Harlesden Police- station he was charged, but made no reply. Be- fore he was charged he made a statement which was committed to writing. The statement, which was handed to the magistrates, was not disclosed. Upon this evidence Inspector Pol- lard asked for a remand for a week, which was granted. The third son of Devereux is at a boarding school at Kenilworth. The father went there some weeks ago and said he was a widower desirous of placing his son out. The boy arrived a month ago. Devereux paid Sunday visits, and a few days ago endeavoured to arrange for the lad to be kept during the Easter holidays. Devereux represented that he had a twelve months' engagement at Coventry. POST-MORTEM EXAMINATIONS. I Ori Sunday Professor Pepper and Dr. Robertson. the divisional police surgeon, who conducted the post-mortem examination of the body of one of the two children, whose remains, with those of their mother, Mrs. Devereux, were found in a trunk made the autopsy of the other two bodies. The examination, which lasted several hours, was mainly directed to an attempt to discover any traces of poison. All the well known tests were applied, but without any positive result. While theinvestiga. tion failed to disclose the existence of any of the familiar mineral poisons which are more or less promptly discoverable, it was not, it is stated, of that exhaustive character to negative the supposi- tion that a somewhat obscure vegetable poison may have been employed. In fact, the state of certaio organs was consistent with the theory of the use of aconite, but the question will be left to the further investigations of Sir Thomas Stevenson, the Home Office expert, to determine, certain parts of the remains having been forwarded to the Home Office for this purpose.

THE FORTRESS OF VLADIVOSTOCK.…

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I A PIGEON TALE.

I SOLDIER AND NURSE.

GASTRIC CATARRH AND INDIGESTION.

— II A COMIC CONSPIRACY.

I-I I ANOTHER FLOATING EXHIBITION.

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PUBLIC MEN ON PUBLIC MATTERS.

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I"THE LAWS DELAY." I

A FORTUNE FROM MARRIAGE ANNOUNCEMENTS.

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J . DISPUTE OVER OLD BONES.

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A PRINCESS'S SARCOPHAGUS.

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----A PRISON MARRIAGE.

RAT-RIDDEJN ISLAND.

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