Hide Articles List

28 articles on this Page

I DEATH OF LORD CHELMSFORD.

News
Cite
Share

DEATH OF LORD CHELMSFORD. General Lord Chelmsford died at the United I Service Club, in London, at a quarter to twelve on Sunday morning. He was seized by an illness at the club on the preceding Thursday, and could not be removed. Lady Chelmsford was at his bedside on Saturday night, and three of Lord Chelmsford's sons were present at the end. The eldest son of that Frederic Thesiger who was appointed Lord Chancellor in 1858 by the late Lord Derby, entered the army 1844. He was present at the siege and fall of Sevastopol, and he saw service in the Indian Mutiny, the Kaffir and the Zulu wars, and the Abyssinian campaign. He will be remembered chiefly in connection with tne rather unfortunate campaign of 1878. As General Thesiger he had quelled the Kaffir re- bellion under Kreli and Sandiili in 1877. In the following year a quarrel arose between Cete- wayo and the High Commissioner of South Africa, and on the last day of 1878 war broke out. General Thesiger, who was now Lord Chelms- ford, was put in command of the British forces, and on January 22, 1879, came the memorable disaster of Isandhlwana. The news of this defeat created a feeling of dismay which was only tempered by the heroic story of Rorke's Drift. For the next six months the British forces had to fight a defensive campaign, during which a second sensation was caused by the death of the Prince Imperial in June. How the recon- noitering party, which fell into an ambuscade, and how the Prince, who was an expert horseman, was unable to mount a restive charger, and fell pierced by Zulu spears while his companions gal- loped away, is now familiar history. The episode did not add lustre to a campaign which had already been sadly mismanaged. Fortunately, however, for the military reputation of the late Lord Chelms- ford, he was able to pull his forces together, and to win a complete victory over the Zulus at Ulundi before Sir Garnet Wolseley, who had come out from England to take supreme command, actually came into the field. At the close of the war Lord Chelmsford re- turned to England, where he became a Lieut. General in 1882, and Governor of the Tower in 1884. He retired from the army in 1893. In spite of the disasters in the early part of the Zulu campaign, Lord Chelmsford enjoyed a long and, in the main, successful military career, and he had never lost his zeal for the army. Since his retirement he has always taken a keen interest in military affairs, and especially in the training of young cadets. He is succeeded by his son, the Hon. Frederic John Napier Thesiger, who was educated at Oxford, and was called to the Bar in 1892.

I THE PIRACY OF MUSIC. |

DEATH OF LORD ST. HELIER.I

[No title]

'H TRUE TILL DEATH.-.-

Advertising

[No title]

Advertising

[No title]

[No title]

| THE KING AND QUEEN. !

I THE BUDGET IN BRIEF.

[No title]

I MISS CHAMBERLAIN SPEAKS…

! THE MAD MULLAH.'

I KILLED BY A CAf. J

TOv-VI TOPICS.

————————————————— RussiaJs…

r WEAKNESS AND KIDNEY TROUBLE.…

RIVALRY AND RACE ANTAGONISM…

HOW THE LUNGS BECOME ! DISEASED.…

-: SURGEON'S SELF-SACRIFICE.…

[No title]

THE WARj I

COLLAPSE OF A RESERVOIR IN…

I CAMBRIAN OOLLIERY EXPLOSION-…

Advertising

-"-__--A VETERAN JOURNALIST.…