Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

34 articles on this Page

TOWN TOPICS. -

News
Cite
Share

TOWN TOPICS. (From Our London Correspondent.) The City is preparing to give a right Roy a; 'he welcome to. King Alfonso of Spain when be visits this country early in June as the guesC of King Edward. The forthcoming visit was made the occasion of a special meeting of the Court of Common Council, when the Chief Commoner (Mr. T. H. Ellis) made a speech full of historic interest. He reminded those present that King Alfonso was the youngest of European Monarchs, and also that His Majesty had the distinction of being proclaimed King at his birth. The Chief Commoner referred further to the historical and domestic ties which bound the two nations, and to the fact that the Court of Common Council adopted saveral years ago a resolution expressive of its admiration of the character of the young King's father. He concluded by moving that His Majesty should be invited to accept an address of welcome in a gold box, and to partake of the hospitality of the City at a luncheon to follow the presenta- tion. The motion was unanimously adopted. The programme on the occasion of King Alfonso's visit will, I understand, follow closely on the lines of the arrangements which were made in connection with the reception and entertainment of President Loubet, the King of Italy, and the King of Portugal. The pre- sentation of the address in a gold box will take place in the Library of the Guildhall, where a large number of distinguished guests will be received by the Chief Magistrate in full civic state. The dejeuner will take place afterwards in the Great Hall. The King has altered his plans regarding his Continental visit, and will not proceed to Copenhagen along with the Queen, unless by so doing he can be of service in bringing about peace in the East. It is his intention to spend his brief holiday in cruising about the Mediterranean, but he will be in daily communication with land and in constant touch with current events. The condition of the port of London has long been exercising the minds of engineers and ship-owners. Many heroic measures, involving enormous expenditure, have been proposed, but the most practical scheme is a comparatively modest one. This new scheme, which has received the sanction of the Thames Con- servancy Board, provides for the construction of a huge system of wharfage. When com- pleted the wharf will be able to deal with six million tons of goods in a year. No feiver than twenty ships three hundred feet long and drawing any depth of water up to thirty feet will be able to lie alongside at one time, while a hundred barges can be in attendance to have cargo transferred to them. The wharf runs across a bend in the river for six thousand six hundred feet in all, and at one end there is ample space for the construc- tion of a graving dock, which will be made after the wharf has been constructed. A low embankment wall will be constructed, and on what is the sheltered side of the river a wharf will be thrown across the bend, the frontage being one hundred and forty feet beyond the line of low tide. Between the embankment and wharf, therefore, there will be a great area of sheltered water, in which barges can be loaded from vessels, long armed cranes on the wharf lifting goods straight out of the holds of the ship on the river side and depositing them in the barges on the land side. The promoters have obtained the powers for which they have been asking; they have ample area of land at command, and they believe that they will be able to do something to solve the probkto of the port of London. If the Stock Exchange may be accepted as a barometer—and it has generally proved a pretty reliable one—peace in the East is not far off. The money market is decidedly easier, and the position altogether is cheerful. Whether Russia recognises the futility of prolonging the war or not, it is certain that the financial world does, and the refusal of further aid must make the Russian Government realise its position. Russia really requires peace very urgently in order to attend to her internal affairs, and Japan is quite willing to listen to peace over- tures provided they give solid guarantees for the future and reasonable compensation for the sacrifices she has made. Not only the two com- batants, but the whole civilised world will be the gainers by the cessation of hostilities, and the return of these two Powers to quiet indus- trial pursuits. The Stock Exchange believes that the end is already in sight. Immediately after Easter there will be a large number of society weddings, and the number this year will be greater than usual owing to the fact that, as Easter Day falls on the 23rd, there are only six clear days before the month of May opens-a month in which no young lady who seeks future happiness would dream of getting married. Among the weddings which will take place during these few days are those of Captain J. H. Crawford and Lady Gertrude Molyneux, sister of the Earl of Sefton; Lord Herbert Scott, D.S.O., son of the Duke of Buccleuch, and Miss Marie Edwards; the Earl of Malmesbury and the Hon. Dorothy Calthorpe, daughter of Lord and Lady Cal- thorpe; Captain Francis Farquhar, D.S.O., only son of Sir Henry Farquhar, Bart., and Lady Evelyn Hely-Hutchinson, sister of the Earl of Donoughmore; Sir Isambard Owen, Principal of the Armstrong College, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and Miss Ethel Holland Thomas; and the Hon. J. R. Stopford, son of Viscount Stopford and grandson of the Earl of Courtown, and Miss Cicely Birch, daughter of Viscountess Barring- ton. The Ranelagh Club, Barn Elms, which is the original home of the historic Kit-cat Club, is being redecorated for the approaching season. The stabling accommodation is being consider- ably augmented, so that something like two hundred and fifty polo ponies can be put up. An attractive programme for the season has been arranged, including polo matches with all the best-known teams. The Ladies' Annual Golf Tournament will be played on the 12th and 13th of the present month, and the Parliamentary golf match on the 15th. The Pony Gymkixaua and Ladies' Spt tts are fixed for the first Saturday in June, and on the 17th June there will be ladies' driving competi- tions, with musical ride and pushball by the 21st Lancers, and on the final Saturday in that very busy month the Horse and Polo Pony Show will be held. On Saturday, July 1, members of the Ladies' Automobile dub will engage in an automobile gymkhana; the croquet' tournament will commence on Monday, July 3; and on the 8th of that month, when the finals are to take place, there are to be draghound races. The Pony Gymkhana and the Polo Pony Races are set down for fol- lowing Saturdays, namely, July 15 and 22 respectively. The dates for the visits of the Four-in-Hand and Coaching Clubs and the date on which the military massed bands will play will be announced later on. Should there be a sufficient number of stage coaches on the road a meeting of them will be arranged in July, T.

[No title]

I NORTH SEA BILL.

SIR CHARLES HARTOPP'S DIVORCE…

140 KILLED IN TRIBAL WAR.…

HAVE YOU CATARRH? I

[No title]

[ TREACHEROUS SPRING WEATHER.…

I KING ALFONSO'S COMING CONSORT.…

GERMANY AND MOROCCO. I

KILLED BY A LION. I

[No title]

[ RAPID BALLOON JOURNEY. j

LIFE ON SIXPENCE A WEEK. 1.!

THE SCOTTISH CHURCH DIFFICULTY.

DIPLOMATISI'S NARROW ESCAPE.

THE DEPTFORD MURDER. I

A YORKSHIRE CASE. I

I ARMY COMMISSIONS. , I

BELGIAN HEIR PRESUMPTIVE.…

[NATIONAL PROVIDENT INSTITUTION.

[No title]

Advertising

Russia's Dreadful State I

[No title]

I BEWARE OF JUGGLERS. 1

I -CURIOUS TOWN-NAMES. -I

Advertising

ISEX AND THE CENSUS.-

[No title]

Advertising

IA BIG REGATTA.

I ADVENTURES OF A GUINEA.

[No title]