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- CURRENT SPORT. I

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CURRENT SPORT. I WINDING UP OF COUNTY CKICKBT. Six counties finished their Championship pro- grammes on Saturday, and Lancashire, with another win, closed their campaign at the top of the tree, with an unbeaten record. Derby- shire were set 295 runs to get to win, but al- though they started well they failed to maintain their form, and the later batsmen failing badly they were beaten by 131 runs. Yorkshire scored a very hollow win over Somerset at Taunton, the margin in their favour being an innings and 152 runs. In securing the 39 runs required to win, at Brighton, Middlesex lost one wicket, and thus defeated Sussex by nine wickets. A capital struggle between Hamp- shire and Warwickshire at Bournemouth, ended in a very meritorious win for the home county by 40 runs. At Canterbury the South Africans sustained their third reverse of the tour, Kent beating them by 104 runs. A very tame draw was the termination of the match between Wor- cestershire and Leicestershire at Worcester. NINE WICKETS FOR NO RUNS. Nine wickets for no runs This was the re- markable feat accomplished by H. Barker, play- ing for St. Giles' Guild against Horningsea, at Cambridge, on Saturday. Horningsea batted first, and Barker with his second ball sent back Harvey, whilst his fourth delivery accounted for Stevens. Brand's first sequence of deliveries produced a couple of singles, and then Barker commenced an extraordinary over, in which he took five wickets. Ellwood was clean bowled first ball, and Nottage took his place only to be bowled by the first delivery he received. It then became a question of whether Barker would perform the "hat trick." Cook was the batsman, and put his leg in front of a straight one. There were confident appeals from all parts of the field, the batsmen was given out, and Barker had the "hat trick" to his credit. He, however, did not stop there, for with his next ball he beat F. Stevens, and from his fifth Richardson smartly stumped Noble. Thus were five wickets captured with five balls. The side were out for 10, and St. Giles made 175. CHAMPIONS v. "REST." There should-and, weather permitting, will I —be a huge crowd at Kennington Oval on Sep- tember 12 to see the trial of strength between Lancashire, as champion county, and the Rest of England. The match is to extend, if neces- sary, over four days, so there is a reasonable | prospect of this most interesting match being played to a finish. The Rest will have a won- derfully good side, if not the very best; but the best possible side was never yet available. By force of circumstances there are always at least one or two notable absentees. On this occasion it is regrettable to find that Ranjitsinhji, Fry, and Mason are unable to play, and it is impos- sible adequately to replace three such men. Nevertheless the side actually chosen is so strong that Lancashire will have to play right at the top of its form to maintain its unbeaten re- cord. The profits of the match are to be divided equally between two excellent causes- the Cricketers' Fund and the London Playing Fields Society; so let us hope good "gates" may accrue. AN INTERESTING MATCH "OFF." A good deal of disappointment was felt and ex- pressed when it became known that the long- anticipated meeting between Mr. Warner's M.C.C. Eleven and a Rest of England team, which had been fixed to be played at Scar- borough, had been abandoned. Fry and Ran- jitsinhji had cried off, but this was of less im- portance than the fact that two of the foremost members of the team that won the rubber- Mr. R. E. Foster and Braulid-were prevented from taking part in the encounter. In these circumstances it was resolved to drop the fix- ture altogether in preference to playing out a sort of test match which would have been no test at all. The match at Lord's in May was disappointing, and had no definite result, and now the September match has had to be aban- doned. The truth is the one was too early and the other too late. As a matter of fact now interest in cricket has, for the season, flic- kered out, and the eyes of nearly all lovers of outdoor sport are turned on football. INTERNATIONAL CYCLING. Splendid entries have been received for the World's International Cycling Championships at the Crystal Palace. An event which brings to our shores the finest riders from America, Australia, the Argentine Republic, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, and Switzerland, to compete with the best riders in England, Scotland, and Wales for the champion- ships of the world, in both the amateur and pro- fessional classes, is bound to be treated as a wonderful event, even in such a place as London where great events happen daily. From its inception the meeting has received the warmest support of all classes, and owing to its inter- national character the distinguished patronage of their Majesties the King and Queen and their eir Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of Wales has been accorded it. The championships are competed for annually, and are run off in the different countries affiliated to the Union Cycliste International. This is the first time the events have been allotted to England, and in the ordinary course about fifteen years must elapse before they can possibly be held here again. They are being held under the auspices of the National Cyclists' Union, the governing body of the sport in England and Wales. The distances are two kilometres (about It milee) for sprint 4 ■riders, and 100 kilometres (about 62^ miles) for long, distance riders. The latter event will be paced 'by motors. A GRAND ROAD RIDE. Mr. A. E. Boyle, of the Bath-road Club, start- ing from the General Post-office, Edinburgh, at four o'clock on Friday morning of last week, reached the General Post Office, London, at eiglit minutes past nine on Saturday morning, beating the previous record held by Mr. F. Wright, of the North-road Club, by two hours and forty minutes. He completed the journey in the extra- ordinary time of twenty-nine hours and eight minutes. Mr. Boyle had to contend with a head wind all the way. LONG DISTANCE SWIMMING. The members of the Hammersmith Swimming Club on Saturday afternoon held a long distance scratch race over the championship course from Kew railway bridge to Putney pier-a distance of about five miles one furlong-for a trophv pre- sented by Mr. W. J. Bull, M.P. The race resulted as follows 1, S. Keys; 2, M. Tuite. Keys_won by 200yd. in lhr. 25min. L. Burgoyne and 1. Reakes did not finish, owing to cramp, the temperature of the water being low for the time of the year. MEREDITH IN FORM. Some capital sport in the athletic and cycling i "way was witnessed in metropolitan and provincial districts alike last Saturday. Leon Meredith, of the Paldington C.C., the five miles and fifty miles champion, won a five miles scratch race TJL +6 "track record" time of llmin. 58sec. at „v e er: S. W. Lack, the Eastern Counties "\Trirt>a!0n'iW-Sn scratch mile at Lincoln. At P"k Sports, Lee, G. F. Clevely, of can with Harriers, won the 300 yards handi- A C Sof/ar+ds start' E- Bobbins, of the Kent 72* Va'rds • T n ln the open half-mile with. Tl4 vards star^^a11' ^rtha^pton Institute II. „1T1 li .v»ras start) secured the mile •p „ e "a TjiM r Miles Championship Race of the Effra Conservative Association for tha challenge cup presented by Mr. C. E Tritton M.P., wa3 that E. Toms made that trophy his own property. E. H. Montague, the half-mile champion of Surrey, put in two smart per- formances at the Great Eastern Railway sports at Leyton. I RECORD GOLF. Robert Maxwell, the amateur golf champion cf 1903, accomplished a remarkable performance on the links of the Prestwick Club on Saturday. He went round in the fine score of 66, and thus beat John Hunter's record for the course by three strokes. The details of Mr. Maxwell's score were: -.out, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4-30; home, 5. 4, 5, 4, 4, 4, 3, 4, 3-36. Total, 66. AMERICAN ATHLETES. At the St. Louis athletic meeting on Monday, Flanagan, of New York, threw a 161b. hammer 168ft. lin., breaking his own and the world's record; while R. C. Ewry, of New York, broke the world's record for the standing broad jump by clearing lift. 4 7-8in. A FINE LAST WICKET STAND. At Kennington Oval, thanks to a fine stand for the last wicket by Goatly and Stedman of 129 on Monday, Surrey made 236 in their first innings against the South Africans. The latter started none too well, and when stumps were drawn on Monday night had only made 134 for the loss of six good wickets. After a total of 280 had been made on Monday by Somerset against Hampshire at Bournemouth, the home county replied with 99 for two wickets. Major Hedley scored 81 for the visitors. Less than an innings was got through on Monday in the match at Hastings between Sussex and Kent, as, batting first, the visitors remained in possession the whole of the time cricket was playable, and scored 286 for nine wickets, Alec Hearne contribut- ing 89 before he was unfortunately run out. Against a strong M.C.C. team Yorkshire put up a. big total at Scarborough, the end of the Monday's play finding the county with 435 runs for the loss of nine wickets. H. Wilkinson made 113, liio highest innings in first-class cricket. GREAT INNINGS BY HAYWARD. Hayward played a great innings of 197 for Surrey against the South Africans at Kenning- ton Oval on Tuesday, and completed his 3,000 runs for the season. The Colonials on Wednes- day morning wanted 444 runs to win with all ten wickets to fall. At Scarborough, the York- shire first innings closed for 475, to which the M.C.C. team could only reply with 234. Fol- lowing on, the visitors made 53 for no wicket before Tuesday nightfall. It was late in the afternoon before play was resumed at Bourne- mouth on Tuesday in the match between Hamp- shire and Somerset, owing to a heavy thunder- storm. Hampshire, who overnight had scored 99 for two wickets, against their opponents' 280, advanced their figures to 241 for four vic- kets. Sussex did not on Tuesday fare very well at Hastings against the Kent bowlers, their in- nings falling short of the 290 put up by Kent by 70 runs. This advantage Kent increased to 127 before the end of the day, when they had still nine wickets to fall.

| MANY MOTORS. I

I SHOT ON A MOOR. I

I SEARCH FOR THE SMOLENSK.…

! MISHAP TO MISS ROOSEVELT.…

J A DEAR'S FAILURES.

DISAPPOINTING HARVEST. I

TROUBLESOME LADYBIRDS. I

KRUGER'S TREASURE. I

I RIGHT OF WAY DISPUTE.I

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DEATH OF THE BISHOP OP I SOUTHWELL.

THE RICHEST WIDOW. i -I

|THE DUKE'S ADVICE.I

HOW TO COLLECT.I

ICYCLE OF WOMEN'S NAMES.

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CYCLIST CHARGED WITH MAN-…

KENTISH TRAGEDY. I

CAPTURE OF A GENERAL. I

STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. I

COMMANDER REPRIMANDED. I

UNDESIRABLE ALIENS.

i BUCKINGHAM PALACE CHANGES.

t TERRORISED BY A GIRL.

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BURGLARS' BIG MEAL. I

KILLED BY A WASP. I

ANTWERP OIL BLAZE. I

ITHE SCOTTISH KIRKS. I

A VINDICTIVE EPITAPH.|

THE REVENUE. I

AN M.P.'S MARRIAGE.

SHOT IN BARRACKS. .........-.

I A COSTLY LIFEBOAT. !

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ART AND LITERATURE

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