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TOWN TOPICS. I

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I "MODERN FINANCE." ,

-, A QUEEN'S WILL.

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A QUEEN'S WILL. DISPUTE BETWEEN KING AND PRINCESSES. The Civil Tribunal in Brussels has given judgment in the application made by the creditors of the Princesses Louise and Stephanie of Bel- gium to set aside the will of the late Queen of the Belgians. The Court refused the application of the plaintiffs with costs, holding that the Act of 1853 was a diplomatic treaty, and that since that time the Queen's property has come under the operation of the principle of separate estates. Queen Maria Henrietta died at Spa in September, 1902. The bequests under her will related to the Queen's private estate, but the pressure brought to bear by the creditors of Princess Louise of Coburg, who benefited under the will as a daughter, made trouble with the King as to the interpretation of her rights. All efforts to bring the dispute to an amicable termination failed, and the result was the extra- ordinary spectacle of a King sued in the courts of his kingdom by the creditors of his daughter. The creditors contended for their part that there was no marriage contract in a legal sense between the King and his Consort, because they entirely forgot to ratify the contract within six weeks of the solemnisation, as the Belgian law requires. Hence under the law there was a joint partner- ship in property, and under it half of King Leopold's immense fortune would fall in as having belonged to the late Queen. The King, on his side, contended that the ques- tion of property between himself and his Consort was governed by the diplomatic settlement, the Treaty of Vienna, 1853, under which the marriage was arranged, and by which there was a separate estate between the contrasting parties. The creditors, among whom were included a Paris jeweller, named Hartog, with a claim of £ 7800; Decroll, Vienna, milliners— £ 6400; and Paquin and Co., Paris, who claimed £ 6800, waited several months for payment after the Queen's death. The then resolved to press for their money. They feared lest King Leopold would, as seemed likely if report was to be trusted, give away his wealth and leave nothing much to hia daughters.

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i "ACTS" OF ST. PAUL.

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NEWS NOTES.

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! AGED 106 YEARS.

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I MORAL STORTES.-III. I

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I DETECTIVES AND DIVORCE.

!NIGHT ALARM. I

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I-! I JATARRH AND INFLUENZA.…

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