Hide Articles List

12 articles on this Page

[No title]

I .CRETAN ANTIQUITIES. I

INEW DIRECTOR OF AUXILIARY…

MARRIED 1,727 TIMES. I

FURNISHING TRADE EXHIBITION.…

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

It seems only fair that a person who has been wrongfully sentenced to djath should receive some sort of compensation, if the mistake be dis- covered in time. They recognise this in Austria, though not everywhere else. A woman named Theresa. Gietzinger underwent this tragic experi- ence. Her sentence was commuted to penal servitude for life, and recently, after she had served some years of her penalty, it was dis- covered that a judicial error bad occurred. She claimed an indemnity of 11,000 crowns, and the Government have now accorded to her 4,873 crowns and a pension of 360 crowns per annum. Between the mountains of India and Persia is a powerful tribe among whom an extraordinary custom prevails. Women's rights have appar- ently received full recognition, for the ladies of the tribe can choose their own husbands. All a single woman has to do when she wishes to change her state is to send a servant to pin, a handkerchief to the hat of a man on whom her fancy lights, and he is obliged to marry her, un- less he can show that he is too poor to purchase her at the price her father requires. As an introduction to a practical demonstra- tion by Mrs. Helen Best, of her face treatment, Mrs. Stannard (John Strange Winter) advised women in general, and plain women in particular, that if they could not to attain real beauty, they might at least be as beautiful as they could. "The present day skin specialist," she said, "employs rather gentler methods than was the case some time ago." She gave two instances of the old "heroic" treatment. One was Wash the face every day for a week in a solution of lemon-juice mixed with alum and basalt, and the other-Boil up mustard and vinegar, and keep the solution on the face all night. One woman she knew literally slept in raw veal. A match between Middlesex and Yorkshire is a sort of miniature Gentlemen and Players, and if advertised in the manner of fifty years ago could be truthfully announced as "The Gentle- men of Middlesex (with two players) v. The Players of Yorkshire (with one peer)," utyg a writer in the "Court Journal." The suggestion that a player is not a gentleman is surely ungraceful. Why not "amateurs" and nlavera

I EPITOME OF N'EWS.

FIELD AND FARM.

I GARDEN GOSSIP,

I OUR SHORT STORY.

LONG LIVERS. I

THE TIBET EXPEDITION'S I TELEGRAPH.