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I .CRETAN ANTIQUITIES. I

INEW DIRECTOR OF AUXILIARY…

MARRIED 1,727 TIMES. I

FURNISHING TRADE EXHIBITION.…

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FURNISHING TRADE EXHIBITION. THE SUPERIORITY OF HOME GOODS. It is satisfactory to be able to say that in one trade at least, the Britisher continues to hold his own against all competitors. Of course, the German may cut in a little with furniture made at half the wages obtaining in this country and the American may have a. practical monopoly of the roller-top desk and the office cabinet, but taken altogether the trade of furnishing in Eng- land still stands unrivalled. The exhibition at the Agricultural Hall at Islington gives abun- dant evidence of this, for at no time in its eight years' career has the show so absolutely vindi- cated the superiority of home-made goods. There are more British stalls and exhibitors than of any other nationality, and everything in the great Islington show goes to demonstrate that the home manufacturer is keenly alive to the possi- bilities of improving the taste and adding to the comfort of the articles which go to make "the house beautiful." There may not be anything very strikingly novel in the articles on view-a new book-rest for an arm-chair, a fresh design in the sideboard1, or a devise in the arrangement of the mirrors on a dressing-table—but there is everywhere a tendency on the part of the makers to finish their work better and, at the same time, to avoid flimsiness. One circumstance, which cannot but have an excellent effect, is a work- man's competition, in which new designs and the best class of workmanship are rewarded with prizes. Chairmakers have entlred in very large numbers, and there are some really artistic speci- mens in upholstery. There has also been a good entry for sideboards and fancy cabinets.

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I EPITOME OF N'EWS.

FIELD AND FARM.

I GARDEN GOSSIP,

I OUR SHORT STORY.

LONG LIVERS. I

THE TIBET EXPEDITION'S I TELEGRAPH.