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TOWN TOPICS. !

;W- --NEWS NOTES.

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BURTED BY A CLIFF. I

I LABOUR M.P.S' APPEAL. <…

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LABOUR M.P.S' APPEAL. < TO COLONIAL WORKERS. The Labour members of the House of Commons have signed an appeal to workmen in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand relative to Mr. Cham- berlain's fiscal policy. The appeal is as follows: "Mr. Chamberlain has proposed to the people of the United Kingdom to alter their fiscal policy in the interests of Imperial unity. He asks us to put a tax upon our food on order that we may give a preference to you for so much of it as yoiti supply to us. (Speech in House of Commons, 2 May, 1903.) And he tells us that' a system of preferential tariffs is the only system by which I this Empire can be kept together.' (Speech at Constitutional Club, 26 June, 1903.) We dissent from his proposals. But we do not yield to him in our goodwill towards you, or ia the strength of our desire to promote that goodwill by every means in our power consistent with those principles of justice and equality, operating between you and us, from which it has sprung, and upon which alone, as we believe, it can durably rest. "Stripped of rhetorical ornament, and of some subsidiary suggestions that do not concern you, and that appear to be made to us for the purpose of bribing us into an acceptance of his main pro- posal, what Mr. Chamberlain asks is that we should tax our food for your benefit. "We in the Old Country have experience to prove that a tax upon food produces an amount of misery, pressing more particularly on the poorest among us, to which you, with your vast natural resources and sparse population, can never be sub- jected. From this experience many of your own fathers suffered; and it may be that the recollec- of it has not passed away from the memories of some still alive among you. We have, here at home, a population that is far in excess of our own food supply. Tlit-t population has been sustained during the last 5U years, and has increased and multiplied, on food drawn, in steadily increasing quantities, from every quarter of the globe. You, on the contrary, have a food supply that is'more than equal to yoi i i- demands. You export from your abundance. We import to make good a deficiency that is estimated to be equal to three fourths of our total consumption. This simple fact makes a change in our free import poHcy of far greater consequence to us than any fiscal change can be to you. Our policy has been determined primarily by our need for an un- restricted supply of food-the first necessary of life. Yours is in no way affected by this need. The difference between free food and taxed food is, to masses of our people, the difference between a bare sufficiency and an actual insufficiency. We, therefore, believe that you have never understood what a tax on food would mean to us, or that Mr. Chamberlain wrongs you when he tells us that you ask for it. We lost half of our colonial umpire in the eighteenth century because we claimed and tried to enforce a right to tax the colonies for our benefit. We are now told that we shall lose you unless we consent to tax ourselves for your benefit. Our action in the eighteenth century was not just to our solonies, and it brought to us its due penalty. What would be the result if we yielded now to what we are told is your demand ? The process of exaction would be reversed; but would it be more just ? "We do not, however, believe that you have made the demand. It is not consistent with the characteristic traditions of our raoe, as these are exemplified among you in the colonies and amor", us at home. Nor is it consistent with these great principles of equal liberty and equal justice which, in their application to the re- lations between you and us, have made us all willing members of a great brotherhood of kindred nations. And if the constitutional structure of our common Empire is ever to be completed, as in the interests of peace and of the orderly pro- gress of human civilisation we ardently hope it may be, then it must be by a fuller application of the same principles of equal liberty and equal justice that have carried it to its present great position in the world, and not by adopting a suggestion that would be in open conflict with them. An arrangement that would be felt by us as a profound injustice can never be the means of cementing our relations with you. Nor, we are convinced, would it ultimately promote your welfare. We therefore earnestly appeal to you to heip us to defeat these most injurious proposals. (Signed) W. ABRAHAM. C. FENWICK. RICHARD BELL; J. KEIR HARDIE. HENRY BROADHURST. ARTHUR HENDERSON. JOHN BURNS. B. PICKARD. THOMAS BURT. D. J. SHACKLETON. W. RANDAL CREMER. JOHN WILSON." WILL CROOKS.

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NO MORE MUSIC LESSONS. i

LORD GRENFELL'S WEDDING. !

EARL ROBERTS IN SCOTLAND.…

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! THE HUMBERT FRAUDS. I

IBASEBALL ACCIDENT. I

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-NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN DAIRYING.

TWO NEW V.C.'S.

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EXPLORATION IN LAOS.

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