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NEWS NOTES. I k I

FIRE IN A TUNNEL. I

STRANGE PULPIT ADDRESS.I

PRINCE AND PRINCESS OF WALES.I

CYCLISTS AND RAILWAYS.

THE NATION'S GUESTS. I

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THE NATION'S GUESTS. I An Injustice to India Removed. Last year there was a good deal of indignation felt when it became known that India was to be charged with the expense of the Coronation re- ception at the India Office. Eventually the Government decided that the British Treasury should pay for the entertainment of the Indian princes delegates, and troops who came here to honour the King. The correspondence which passed on the sub- ject between the India Office and the Treasury has now been issued as a Parliamentary paper. It appears that the sum of £ 86,700 was pro- vided in the Indian Estimates for the Coronation expenses, and only £2,000 was allotted by the Treasury towards the cost of the reception and other ceremonies. This Lord George Hamilton declared to be "wholly inadequate," and he urged the Treasury to do what would be "fair and poli- tic," and to pay all or at least a reasonable part of the whole sum expended. The Treasury re- ceived this request "with some surprise," but, under instructions from the Government, agreed to pay the whole sum. The India Office, in acknowledging this deci- sion, suggested that a committee should be ap- pointed by the Treasury and itself to consider the fixed principles that should govern the cost of the future visits of Indian guests invited to this "ountry by the Government. A Sensible Decision. This suggestion was adopted, and in December the committee, which consisted of Sir Arthur Godley and Sir E. W. Hamilton, with Sir W. A. Baillie-Hamilton added to represent the Colonial Office, signed their report. It recommended that Great Britain should pay the expenses of all its guests, Indian as well as Colonial, excluding, of course, the cost of their journeys to and from this country—that, in fact, the nation should behave as a private person does when he invites friends to visit him. The committee suggested that the reason for the payment by India of the expenses of Indian guests, which has prevailed hitherto, lay in this that when India was governed by "John Com- pany," the cost of entertaining Indian guests in England naturally fell upon the revenues of the company, of which the directors lived here in London and acted as hosts. When,India was taken over by the Crown the revenues of the company became the revenue of India, but the old arrangement continued in force. The Treasury do not object to the recommenda- tion of the committee. They only claim that they shall be informed in advance how many guests are to be invited, and what the cost of their entertainment will be.

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[TRANSVAAL TRADE. 111

IA RACE OF BATTLESHIPS. I

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AN INF ANTS DEBTS. j

THE KAISER'S PALM WREATH.

IHOW OLD EGGS ARE SOLD.I

CRIMINAL'S FIERCE BEHAVIOUR.I

I=== I BRISK EMIGRATION.I

! NEW QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL.I

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THE IRISH MOTOR RACE.

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A FISHY DINNER.

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"EDNA LYALL'S" WILL. I

IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.I

I TAMPERED WITH A SHELL. I

LICENSING DIFFICULTIES. I

THE MONROE DOCTRINE. I

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THE VENTRILOQUIST'S SECRET.…

FRENCH SMOKERS.

COMING CRICKETERS.

- POLAR SLEDGING

NEWSPAPER PRESS FUND..-I

|MR. HANBURY ON AGRICULTURE.…

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