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CURRENT SPORT.

PROCEEDINGS I IIN PARLIAMENT.I

I LIEUTENANT BAUDIE'S DEATH.…

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! AFTER TI-IE WAR.

THE ETON MEMORIAL.

1 SPECIAL GRATUITY FOR THE…

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PUBLIC MEN ON PUBLIC IMATTERS.

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PUBLIC MEN ON PUBLIC I MATTERS. MR: MORLEY IN EDINBURGH. Mr. Morley, on Saturday, addressing a large meeting of Liberals at Edinburgh, repudiated the charge of disloyalty to their country on the part of some Liberals. Whatever their opinions as to the origin of the War, they welcomed Peace, and observed that the terms of settle- ment contained as near as could be principles which Liberals had advocated for the last few months, and perhaps longer. Unless the terms were carried out promptly and effectively, there would be the same mess as was produced owing to the delay m 1880. The Liberal Party would have a great and powerful share in filling in the skeleton provisions of the agreement for Peace. Circumstances now compelled Liberal Unity, and he was completely satisfied with the leader- ship of Sir H. Campbell-Bannerman and Lord Spencer. If a new Liberal Government were formed, the Irish Question would at once have to be considered. A good programme was afforded the Liberal Party by the Government policy of re-action, as evidenced by the Educa- tion Bill and Corn Tax. MR. GERALD BALFOUR AT GRAYS. Mr. Gerald Balfour, President of the Board of Trade, on Saturday attended the annual inspection of the boys on the training ship Exmouth, at Grays, and in a speech he delivered at the luncheon which followed, spoke in terms of praise of the transport services rendered by the mercantile marine during the War. In the course of nearly three years not a single life had been lost by accident or shipwreck in the transport of our troops—a record' of which the mercantile marine might well be proud. THE EARL OF ROSEBERY AND MR BALFOUR. A correspondence has passed between Lord Rosebery and Mr. Balfour with reference to the lafter's statement in a recent speech that the ex-Premier had advised at Chesterfield that "we should grant, as a preliminary to the cessation of hostilities, a great measure of amnesty to the rebels in our own Colonies." Lord Rosebery cannot believe that I ever uttered words so alien to all my opinions on this subject." Mr. Balfour replies by quoting a long passage from page 15 of the authorised version of the Chesterfield speech, which in his opinion justifies his statement. Lord Rosebery does not admit the justification, and concludes the friendly controversy in these words: I well know from personal expe- rience the tricks that memory plays with one in speaking. Only the other day I misquoted or misapplied some words of Lord Salisbury's about resolute government." He adds: "I should not have troubled you about your statement had it not been for the singular emphasis which you gave to it." LIBERALS AND THE EDUCATION BILL. Lord Rosebery presided on Tuesday evening at a meeting held in the Queen's Hall in London under the auspices of the London Progressive Education Council, to protest against the Educa- tion Bill. Letters from Sir H. Campbell-Banner- man and Mr. Bryce, M.P., condemnatory of the bill, were read. Lord Rosebery said the bill laid down for all time a cast-iron system of denomina- tional management and of close corporations in the direction of popular education which, if it prevailed, would put an end for ever to the dearest hopes of the Nonconformists and also of the advocates of efficient education. The religious difficulty was practically ignored in the bill, and an enormous financial burden would be handed over to be spent or directed by a govern- ing body in which the proportion of popular re- presentation would be insignificant. At a time when the nations were striving against each other for commercial existencethe Government came forward with a measure which would do more to stunt the educational development of the country than almost any other conceivable proposal. A resolution condemnatory of the bill was moved by Mr. Lyulph Stanley, seconded by Dr. Guinness Rogers, and supported by Mr. Asquith, who cha- racterised the bill as the deliberate throwing away of a priceless opportunity. The resolution was unanimously carried. LORD ROBERTS AND THE RESERVISTS. Lord Roberts, on Tuesday speaking at the annual meeting of the National Association for the Employment of Reserve Soldiers, held at the Royal United Service Institution, Whitehall, heartily commended the Society to the considera- tion of all interested in their country. Mr. Brod- rick, who spoke at the same meeting, said employers of Reservists might now feel more assured. We had survived the period of tension, and nothing appeared in any part of the world to disturb the prospects of Peace.

I THE KING'S DINNER TO THE…

I SPECIAL SERVICE VOLUNTEERS.…

KITCHENER'S RISE AND REWARD…

A BATTLE OF DHOWS. I

I QUEEN'S TEA TO SERVANTS.

THE NAVAL REVIEW.

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