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CURRENT SPORT.

PROCEEDINGS I IIN PARLIAMENT.I

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PROCEEDINGS I I IN PARLIAMENT. I THE BRITISH MUSEUM. Viscount Peel moved on the 9th inst. in the House of Lords the second reading of the British Museum Bill, which provides for the removal, as his lordship explained, of the enormous piles of provincial newspapers and other printed matter at present kept in the British Museum. These would be placed in buildings to be erected on a site of between four and five acres at Hendon. Captain Wells had been consulted, and every pre- caution would be taken against fire. London papers would still be filed at the Museum. Per- sons desirous of consulting papers kept in the new premises could do so in the old buildings after giving some hours' notice. I LOAN BILL. J I The Loan Bill was read a third time, and passed. [ IRISH LAND.—PENSIONS TO SOLDIERS' WIDOWS AND CHILDREN. In the House of Commons Mr. Wyndham, answering Mr. Delany, indicated that there was no prospect of the Irish Land Bill passing this session unless it could be treated as a non-con- tentious measure, and sent to a Grand Com- mittee. Lord Stanley informed Mr. Channing that pensions had been granted to 2863 widows and 4184 children of soldiers who had lost their lives in the war. Mr. Chamberlain told Mr. Mac- Neill that he understood the Constitution of Cape Colony could not be suspended without an Act of the Imperial Parliament. I THE CORN-TAX. I During the discussion of the Budget in Com- mittee an important statement was elicited from Sir Michael Hicks-Beach, who declared and re- iterated again and again that the corn-tax was a revenue measure pure and simple with no ulterior motives underlying it. "I know," said the Chancellor of the Exchequer, that some persons have suggested that we should impose duties as against foreign nations, in order to give an advan- tage to our Colonies. That is not the policy of his Majesty's Government. It is our policy, while ad- hering to our own principles, to do what we can to make trade between ourselves and our Colonies freer, in order, as we believe, to promote the best relations within the Empire." I CORRUPT TRADING. I Appealed to by Earl Grey in the Upper Chamber of the Legislature on the 10th inst. to do some- thing to combat the system of bribes and secret commissions in trading, the Lord Chancellor said he proposed to re-introduce the Prevention of Corruption Bill, though, looking to what was going on in the other House, he could not with confidence say that it would become law this session. RESERVISTS.—ZOLLVEREIN AND FREE I TRADE. Answering a question in the Commons, Lord Stanley stated that reservists at home would be demobilised after June 30. Upon the House going into Committee on the Finance Bill, Sir H. Campbell- Bannerman was the first speaker. Referring to the Zollverein proposal, he said they ought to proceed with the greatest caution before they took the first step in an unknown territory. Sir William Harcourt glorified Free Trade, and was afterwards effectually subjected by Lord Hugh Cecil to the process of Hansardisa- tion." Mr. A. Chamberlain delivered a speech with forcible points. Sir Michael Hicks-Beach replied on the debate, and, after the application of the closure, Clause 1 was carried by a majority of 8b, the ficures being For, 279; against, 193.

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