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-L")-,-I TOWN TOPICS.

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-L") -I TOWN TOPICS. (From Our London Correspondent. J The peopla of London evidently regarded ths fact that the very opening day ot Coronation month brought with it tidings of peace as the happiest of omens. The rejoicings which were spontaneously and simultaneously forthcoming were a prelude to the solemnity of last Sunday, when the King and Queen Alexandra, accom- panied by all the senior members of tha Royal family now in London, attended the thanks- giving service in St. Paul's. That great cathe- dral has witnessed many such services, but none that have been at once more simple and eii'ee- tive. There was as large an absence as possible of the mere trappings of State pageantry and pomp; but it was felt to be impossible that so solemn and yet auspicious an occasion should be allowed to pass with- out full official recognition. In accord- ance, therefore, with ancient and honoured tradition, the Lord Mayor, accompanied by the Sheriffs of London and the chief eivic officials, awaited the coming of the Sovereign at the City boundary, where Temple Bar for so long stood, and welcomed him to the heart of the capital with a warmth which typified that felt by the thronging thousands who were near. What chiefly delisrhted the crowd which on Sunday morning had assembled along the route from Buckingham Palace to St. Paul's Cathe- dral, and which grew denser and more dense the closer the sacred edifice was approached, was the happy-and, with all respect, it may be said the healthy and hearty-appearance of both their Majesties. The King, who always looks his best in the uniform he was then wearing of a field-marshal, seemed much better and stronger than at the beginning of the year; while it might almost sound like the language of flattery if one truthfully recorded the ap- pearance of the Queen. Her striking beauty and gracious smile have so long been known to us that it is impossible to say one fresh word concerning them, except in wonder that time does nothing to dim the loveliness that appeals to all. But it is more than loveliness that wins the peoples hearts. It was noted as the Queen went by that she especially observed the warm greetings that came from the thousands of children along the route and many a little one is now possessed of the life-long remembrance of having personally viewed one of the sweetest of royal smiles, given upon so happy and historic an occasion. As the Bishop of London truly observed in his sermon before their Majesties in St. Paul's, peace has arrived at a moment when it will complete the general joy over the Coronation. There is no doubt, indeed, that since the news came the preparations for that great event have been proceeding with a happy addition of vigour; and we are now so near to it that they can more and more be marked. The whole country, of course, will participate in the rejoicings, and there is scarcely a village— scarcely even the smallest of hamlets—which will not have its own celebration. But, as is only natural, the chief interest is bound to centre in the capital city of the Empire, where the actual crowning will take place. It is al- ready sufficiently obvious that London will prove itself worthy of its great traditions, and of the occasion which we all shall celebrate; and it is more than ever apparent that a myriad visitors from the country will come.toithe metropolis to share in the general joy. The capital, however, will welcome not only a multitude of unofficial visitors on the occasion, but will receive a great number of representa- tives of distant parts of the Empire, as well as of the whole world. Our colonies, in particular, will be well to the fore; and it is impossible to pass through the London streets just now without being! impressed by this fact, and notably, with the number amongus already who have come from India for the purpose of being present. A strikingly pleasing feature, as regards one section of these visitors, has been the establishment under official auspices of a club for the comfort and convenience of the non-commissioned officers and troopers of the Colonial contingents during their presence in London at proceedings con- nected with the Coronation. Representatives of such varied colonies as Natal, Singapore, and Cyprus were present at the opening—by the Colonial Secretary-of this institution, which, though necessarily temporary in its aim and use, is calculated to have abidingly pleasant memories among those for whom it is designed. One of the features of a London summer in these times is just now getting into full swing, and that is the provision of music in the various public gardens and parks. In regard to tha royal parks, there are enough military bands and to spare for musical provision for them all; and the London County Council has organised an excellent band on its own account, from which contingents are drawn to discourse sweet music under its control. If it be true, as the poet has alleged, that music hath charms to soothe the savage breast, the influence of this effort should be great; and, in any case, there can be no doubt as to its providing innocent and healthy amusement for many thousands. There was a time, and not so very remote from our own, when practically no provision was made for the honest entertainment of the working classes; but, as far as the metropolis is con- cerned, that period has happily passed away, and the moral effect of the present endeavour assuredly makes for good. There is some talk of reviving the now dor- mant Thames penny steamboat service during the Coronation period; but so many and such bitter disappointments have been the lot of the public, in this respect, that the prudent will wait and see before indulging any fond expec- tation too far. Various causes have' been assigned for the non-success of a constant and cheap service on London's silent highway but none of them have ever seemed particularly convincing to those who know what has been done on the Clyde at Glasgow, on the Seine in Paris, and on the Hudson m New York. It has ever been a humiliation to the Londoner when he has enjoyed the cheap and constant steamboat services in either or all of these great cities to remember that in his own home, and thfit the greatest city in the world, no such enterprise is to be enjoyed. So melancholy and miserable a state of things ought not always to continue, but it is one which will never be removed by spasmodic efforts. A here-to-day-and-gone-to-morrow service is, indeed, worse than useless, for :whilebeing fore- doomed to failure, because it disappoints that portion of the public which ever learns of its existence, it places obstacles in the way of any more tangible and permanent institution being established. Many a Londoner is to be'seen at Cambridge during what has long^ been known as the May week," but which might nowadays more ap- propriately be termed the May fortnight," though, as is the case during the present year, it is held in June. A number of these are parents and friends of undergraduates, while others are old collegians desirous of renewing acquaintance with their Alma Mater. Unfor- tunately for the full success of this year's fes- tivities, the four evenings devoted to the famous" bumping" races were marred by rain to a degree unknown for many previous years. But it requires more than heavy showers to thoroughly damp the spirits of the under- graduate and the vigour and enthusiasm.with which he runs along the towpath and cheers his college eight as the crew gamely struggles for victory, should be hoped to be emblematic of the manner in which he will face the more serious problems of life. R.

I THE CORONATION. I

I CONCERNING CORMORANTS. (

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WITH A MISSION LADY. I

AHREST OF COLONEL LYNCH. I

TWO LADIES DROWNED. I

A COLLEGE DESTROYED. I

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THANKSGIVING.

ICAMBRIDGE TRIPOS.

[ ROYAL COUNTIES SHOW.

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