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-L")-,-I TOWN TOPICS.

I THE CORONATION. I

I CONCERNING CORMORANTS. (

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WITH A MISSION LADY. I

AHREST OF COLONEL LYNCH. I

TWO LADIES DROWNED. I

A COLLEGE DESTROYED. I

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THANKSGIVING.

ICAMBRIDGE TRIPOS.

[ ROYAL COUNTIES SHOW.

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For a number of years a distinguished French physician, Dr. Berillon, has been making ob- servations pertaining to the habit of finger-nail biting. The facts which he has gathered show that the habit is a result of a diseased nervoua system. He examined the pupils in a number of schools. The habit is much more prevalent among girls than among boys. In some schools 50 per cent. of the girl pupils had con- tracted the habit. It was noted that the nail- biters were the poorest students. The habit pre- vails most frequently between the ages of twelve and fourteen. A humorous illustration of the fatuousness of parochial litigation comes from Norway. A widow in poor circumstances, being in want of relief, became chargeable to the rates, and there- upon the city of Christiania went to law with a neighbouring commune concerning the question of its liability to contribute. The case was car- ried from one court to another, and after much legal wrangling, and hundreds of pounds being wasted in costs, a final decision was recently ar- rived at. When it occurred to those concerned to make inquiry for the poor old lady who had been the occasion of all the litigation, it was found that she had been dead and buried for years! The latest invention in the domain of ceramics, the "British Clayworker" is authoritatively in- formed, is the manufacture of violins and man- dolins from porcelain. A well-known manu- facturer of the Messein ocarinas and porcelain organs has invented a process for the manufacture of violins and mandoli-nes from clay. Some violins have already been com- pleted, and the inventor has applied for letters patent for the same in different countries. Under this process the violins are cast, and every violin is guaranteed a success and to be excellent for producing music. The latter quality constitutes precisely the chief value of this invention. The porcelain body, it is claimed, is better able to produce sound than a wooden one, since it co-operates in the production of sound, making the notes soft and full.