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-L")-,-I TOWN TOPICS.

I THE CORONATION. I

I CONCERNING CORMORANTS. (

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WITH A MISSION LADY. I

AHREST OF COLONEL LYNCH. I

TWO LADIES DROWNED. I

A COLLEGE DESTROYED. I

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THANKSGIVING.

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THANKSGIVING. ICING AND QUEEN AT ST. PAUL'S. BRILLIANT SCENE. The King and Queen, with the Prince and Princess of Wales and other members of the Royal family, attended a solemn service of thanks- giving for peace at St. Paul's Cathedral, in London, on Sunday morning. The Royal progress from Buckingham Palace to the cathedral was a memorable sight. London poured itself into the streets and cheered their Majesties long and heartily. THE ROYAL PROGRESS. The crowds required little managing, and there was an entire absence of rowdyism. Barriers had been put up in Lud gate-circus and the side streets leading to Ludgate-hill and St. Paul's Churchyard, and these, with a large force of mounted and unmounted police, proved sufficient to keep the route free for carriages and to prevent the people from overcrowding and injuring them- selves. As early as two o'clock in the morning men and women took up their places outside the Cathedral, and by four o'clock there was quite a crowd. Two of the men had journeyed from Macclesfield, and sat up all night, determined to participate in the service. A cluster of nurses from Bartholomew's Hospital were among the earliest arrivals. When the doors were opened the unreserved seats of the Cathedral were quickly filled, and ithe authorities had to borrow a custom of the theatre and put outside the entrances large notices stating Church Full." It was a beautiful morning, with the sun shining warmly, while in the trees the birds twittered joyously. Later the weather became duller, and a cold wind blew. A large number of persons assembled outside Buckingham Palace, and the whole route, especially Trafalgar-square, the Strand, and Fleet-street, was lined with loyal sub- jects, while every window was occupied. Many of the houses were decorated, and welcomes to their Majesties and to Peace were displayed. There was much to see. From nine o'clock a constant stream of carriages rolled from the West to the East, bearing members of the Royal family, of the Cabinet, and of the Royal household, generals and officers in full uniform, and many distinguished peers and civilians. Now and then detachments of the Foot and Horse Guards and of the Royal Fusiliers were cheered as they marched to the cathedral. The Prince of Wales, in his colonel's uniform of the historic City regiment, the Royal Fusiliers, drove in an open carriage with the Princess of Wales from York House, attended by Ladies and Gentlemen of the Household. They had a great reception from the populace. Outside Buckingham Palace the way was kept by a special force of constables wearing the Jubilee medal. A cheer broke from the waiting people as the Royal carriage, drawn by four horses with postil- lions in scarlet coats, drew up in front of the palace. At a few minutes past ten their Majesties drove away. The King wore the blue frock-coat and plumed hat of a field-marshal, and smiled at his enthusiastic reception. The Queen was dressed in mauve and lace, and was accompanied by Princess Victoria. There was no military escort. A posse of mounted police and a couple of grooms in scarlet livery preceded the Royal carriage, and following were two mounted equerries, General Sir Stanley Clarke and Colonel Davidson. All hats were raised as the King and Queen passed, and along the Strand, where the crowds were dense, the utmost enthusiasm was shown. CITY SWORD AT TEMPLE BAR. I At Temple Bar a ceremony reminiscent of the historic rights and privileges of the City of London was performed. Here, at the farthest western boun- dary of his dominion, the Lord Mayor waited in State robes, accompanied by the two Sheriffs, the City Marshal, the City Remembrancer, the Mace Bearer, the Sword Bearer, and other brilliantly uniformed Corporation officers. The Royal carriage stopped, and Sir Joseph Dimsdale, bareheaded and bowing low, tendered the hilt of the City Sword to the King, saying, I surrender to your Majesty the sword of the City, and in the name of your loyal subjects the citizens of London bid you welcome." The King touched the sword, saluted, and said, "Thank you very much." The plaudits of the assembled thousands rang clear. The progress along Fleet-street and up Ludgate- hill was a great triumph of popular loyalty. To avoid the steps an inclined plane had been built up to the main western entrance of the cathedral, and under a canopy their Majesties passed to the service, the joy-bells ringing out from all the City churches. IN THE CATHEDRAL. In the great Cathedral for which Wren drew his inspiration from ancient Rome, the King and the Royal House, the King's Ministers, the Lords and Commons, the heads of the great services, all who stand at this time for the power and pride of England, humbled themselves in gratitude for peace and victory. Military music sounding through the temple, many sat and watched the scene compose itself men who administer the nation's destinies, and the representatives of foreign Powers crowding in, entering gravely, passing to their places under the dome or in the choir; and as one remembered history, the sense of proud relief was poignant. Under the dim cross-lights of the dome, and in so close a throng, some strong face here and there alone could be discerned. Peers of the realm on the north side, Commons on the south, with the headquarters staff of the Army and borough councillors behind them, were thrust back in dark masses almost to the transepts by the reservation of a wide upholstered space of pavement for Royal worshippers and their attendants. On an occasion of semi-State no great brilliance of uniforms assisted the eye, and the summer toilettes of ladies gave the hollow square its only lighter patches. This obscurity of the picture, belittling individuals, was proper to the place and time. All bustle had almost ceased when the ccngre- gation rose at the entrance of the Duke of Cam- bridge, the Princess Christian, and the Duke and Duchess of Argyll. At a short interval came the Duke and Duchess of Connaught, with Prince Arthur and the Princesses Margaret and- Victoria, Prince and Princess Charles of Den- mark, Princess Victoria, Princess Henry of Battenberg, Princess Ena, the Duke of Teck. The red chairs in the central space filled rapidly. The echoes of a "Thanksgiving March," mag- nificently played by the Grenadiers' band, had died on the air a stillness fell upon the great Cathedral, full from door to door. The King and Queen had come. At the west door the Bishop and his clergy, the Dean and Chapter, were making their homage. The splendid crash of the processional hymn broke a moment later upon the silence, trumpet notes and voices pealing up the nave. 'ule singers reached the steps of the choir, end a nervous breathing of the military drums began to punctuate the strong, triumphant lines. Their Majesties, preceded by the Lord Mayor bearing his pearl sword, came to the two thrones that were set amid the central space. They stood for a moment while the Bishop and the venerable Dean made obeisance, received the Lord Mayor's sword upon a table placed before them and so knelt at their faldstools. The, Prince and Princess of Wales, coming after them, took place upon their right a little apart. The "Amen" sounded as they did so. The Princess had on a robe of very light-blue crepon. Blue staff uniforms were the wear of the Royal Dukes; on such an occasion only the guard of honour is in full dress. The other Princesses wore summer costumes. THE "TE DEUM." I The chosen Psalms were sung, "Benedic, anima mea," and "Levavi oculos," and the Canon in Residence was reading the lesson: "Put on, therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, bowels of mercies, kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, long-suffering: "Forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye." Then, all standing, we heard the late Sir Arthur Sullivan's "Te Deum." For this occasion it was adapted, when peace looked as near to the composer as death did. Death came first, for him and for others. Devotional in the quiet opening, with a martial motive continually restrained, the "Te Deum" quickened for one glad moment with a leaping psean of trumpets and boys' voices in clear unison. The supplication, "0 Lord, save thy people," followed with an effect of deep humility; and so the theme gravely marched to a large finale. But its martial motive was developed by the instruments alone when they declaimed the familiar strain of "Onward, Christian Soldiers," the choir rang out against them still. THE PRAYER AND SERMON. The Bishop of Stepney said the collect for the day and the prayers of general thanksgiving but more affecting was the hymn that followed, "0 God, our help in ages past." For in the grand old tune of "St. Ann's" the congregation joined their multidunious voices. The Bishop of London preached. His text was the simple words, "The Blessing of Peace" (Ps. xxix., 10). He recalled the dark days of two years ago, as they were encountered, "with firm lips, dry eyes, and a pregnant silence that aston- ished the world." Who could forget them? Who could forget the love of brave Englishwomen, saying nothing, who crept daily to the War Office? Who could forget how many died? Peace, he said, was a blessing to our King and Queen, for without it something would have been wanting to the happiness of the Coronation it was a blessng to the Empire which war had welded, building up the character of its peoples to our gallant foes, with whom we appealed to the God of Judgment, and whom we gladly wel- come now as fellow-subjects. It was a blessing to all our brave soldiers. So, in a noble exaltation of spirit, the great congregation came to sing the final hymn, "Now thank we all our God," and after it the National Anthem. The blessing was pronounced; the memorable scene dissolved. When the service was over and their Majesties came to their carriages a great shout went up. A few Colonial soldiers, in war-stained khaki, lined up and saluted. The crowds had thickened during the morning, and the scene of enthusiasm as the Royal procession passed down New Bridge- street and along the Thames Embankment has hardly been excelled. The King and Queen reached Buckingham Palace shortly after noon. MILITARY SERVICE AT PRETORIA. A great religious service of thanksgiving for peace was held by the military at Pretoria on Sunday morning. Lord Kitchener and his staff, many generals, and Lady Methuen, as well as 5,000 troops, were present. Ten bands led the singing, and there was an enormous concourse of civilians, estimated at 20,000. The Archbishop of Cape Town preached. He said the Lord had given them that day peace. The soldiers had done their duty nobly and bravely in the field, a great effort for which they were thankful. They must do their duty to the '^nd God had given them. The King would wel- come the troops home. He considered the peace the greatest jewel in the crown, of his Corona- tion. I All must follow the path of duty so that they might indeed be one people in God. Lord Kitchener distributed decorations pre- vious to the service and at the close called for cheers for the King, which were given with im- mense enthusiasm, and followed by cheers for Lord Kitchener. The ceremony was most impressive and of his- torical importance in the records of the Trans- vaal. One officer and forty men from each corps in the field were nresent. SERVICES ELSEWHERE. Thanksgiving services were held on Sunday in acknowledgment of the blessings of Peace in churches of every denomination all through the British Empire, in many cases the local autho- rities attending officially.

ICAMBRIDGE TRIPOS.

[ ROYAL COUNTIES SHOW.

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