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FIELD AND FARM. ]

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I I GARDENING- GOSSIP.

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I OUR SHORT STORY. I

NINE-TENTHS OF THE LAW. I

A KING OVERTHROWN. !

NOISE MAKERS WANTED. I

REMARKABLE BURIALS. I

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REMARKABLE BURIALS. Dr. Lawson Tait, the eminent surgeon, who died at Llandudno in June, 1899, maintained his striking individuality to the last by making an extraordinary request to be buried in a romantic cave in his garden, known as the Gogarth Cave, formerly a portion of the grounds of the ancient Abbey of Gogarth. This, however, is not more strange than the fact that the body of Fred. Archer, the famous jockey, was buried within two hundred yards of the winning-post for the race known as the Cambridgeshire at New- market. To be buried in a pillar was the fate of Clement Spelman, Recorder of Nottngham, who died in 1679. He was put to his rest in an up- right position, enclosed in a pillar in Narburgh Church. This is one of the very few cases of pillar burials, but the upright position has been adopted more frequently. Thomas Cook, who was a Governor of the Bank of England in 1739, died in 1752, and his body was taken to Morden College, Blackheath, where it was taken out of the coffin and buried, in a winding-sheet, upright in the ground. Ben Jonson was buried upright at Westminster. This was disbelieved for a long time, but when the grave was opened some years ago the dramatist's remains were discovered in that attitude. On Palm Sunday, 1461, the battle of Towton was fought, and among the many thou- sands slain in that conflict, one of the most san- guinary ever waged on English soil, was Ralph, Lord Dacre, of Gillesland. He was buried at Saxton, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, seated in an upright position on the back of his favour- ite charger.

A NOTABLE BIBLE.

D EPITOME OF NEWS.

FOUR MIGHTY CRUISERS. I

AN INTERESTING CENSUS.

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