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FIELD AND FARM. ]

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I I GARDENING- GOSSIP.

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I OUR SHORT STORY. I

NINE-TENTHS OF THE LAW. I

A KING OVERTHROWN. !

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A KING OVERTHROWN. There was excitement among Jacobites in Lon- don the other day that the last of the Stuarts had been removed. It was the bronze statue of James II. in Whitehall. As his Majesty was in the way of a Coronation stand the Office of Works removed him, and he now lies in a forlorn corner, where he will stay until the Coronation is over and the stand removed. Poor James II. There was no rest for his bones, and there is none for his effigy. This is the second time it has been moved in the last five years. Tradition attributes the statue to the famous Grinling Gibbons. It is certainly a fine piece of work-the only statue in the metropolis worth looking at, say the ex- perts. Fashioned in bronze, King James looks very dignified and melancholy, and he wears a toga, Roman boots, and a laurel wreath. His original spot was in Whitehall Gardens, within sound, but not within sight of the whirl of the street. His index finger pointed mournfully to the spot where Charles I. was beheaded-or, if it did not, people said it did, which came to the same thing. There he stood for two centuries. In August 1897, in fulfilment of an order given for some forgotten reason by a former First Com- missioner, the statue was placed in Whitehall proper, at the front of Gwydyr House, which is the home of the Charity Commissioners. And now, instead of being able to see another King drive by, he lies on his back, with his head on a pile of shavings, and his avenging forefinger pointing at an upstairs window. Poor James!

NOISE MAKERS WANTED. I

REMARKABLE BURIALS. I

A NOTABLE BIBLE.

D EPITOME OF NEWS.

FOUR MIGHTY CRUISERS. I

AN INTERESTING CENSUS.

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