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OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT.

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OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT. The "arm-chair politician" who loves his club, and to whom party strife is as the very breath of his nostrils, has latterly been like the war-horse in sniffing the battle, though only from afar. For various among the party leaders have once more ascended the platform, apparently invigorated by the temporary cessa- tion of the fight caused by the holidays, and enthusiastic meeting has'answered unto enthusi- astic meeting to prove that politics are no longer dormant among us. Those who are constitu- tionally inclined to quiet, and who would call a plague on both your houses," may deprecate these demonstrations; but, as long as this country is governed by Parliament, so long must such manifestations of the various currents of public feeling take ".place. if we are to be well ruled. It will not be, however, until the Prime Minister speaks at Guildhall at the Lord Mayor's banquet on the Ninth that the full autumnal feast of political oratory will be felt to be spread, for tradition has associated that occa- sion with something unusually striking. Lord Beaconsfield once declared that it was then that the voice of sense and truth was accustomed to be heard; and, although partisans naturally Z, take varying views of such a position, the ex- pression is one that it is always interesting at this season of the year to recall. The coming Ninth of November will be the more noteworthy because it will furnish the first occasion on which the birthday of the reign- ing Sovereign and Lord Mayor's Day will coin- cide. Owing to the continuance of the Court mourning, however, no formal celebrations of the King's birthday are this year to take place but it may fairly be assumed that the West-end clubs will be bright with illuminations on the occasion. In connection with that point, it is being noted that up to now the Belgian glass- makers have not come forward with any novel devices in preparation for the Coronation. They are even now, however, making ready to cater for the British million by offering to sup- ply at a very low rate the old-fashioned bucket- lamps, which have been accustomed so exten- sively to be used for illuminations and at pre- sent it looks very much as if cheapness rather than artistic excellence is the note of all such preparations. With the turn of the year may come a change, for it is evident that, if the Z, capital gets the chance, there will be such a dis- play of loyal enthusiasm next June as shall be almost, if not quite, beyond precedent. Londoners are gloomily resigning themselves to the prospect of a foggy winter. When this particular kind of nuisance commences to exhibit itself in September, it is apt to cause apprehension and when it produces an especi- ally gruesome specimen before October is closed, that apprehension becomes conviction. Last Saturday's fog furnished that especially grue- some specimen, and happy were those who had stayed at home that evening and not gone any distance to enjoy themselves. In certain of the suburbs the fog had been dense all day, but the sun had been shining in the City, and nobody seemed to imagine that the night would find all London re- sembling the pit of Acheron. But that was the resemblance discovered by the many thou- sands who towards midnight streamed forth from the various crowded places of amusement. Nearly every omnibus had ceased to run because of the black fog; cabs, for the same reason, were extremely scarce and the rare spectacle of link-boys flitting to and fro in the darkness with torches guiding belated wayfarers was once more seen in the London streets. Those who were forced to find their way home through the streets almost void of vehicles were impressed by the marked superiority of gas over electricity as an illuminant in time of fog. Even the most powerful of electric lamps threw only an ineffectual beam, while the newest developments in gas-burners gave a penetrating and excellent light. This difference in favour of the older illuminant when there is fog in the air has been noted at sea as well as on land. An electrically lit lighthouse, for instance, carries its rays far further in a clear atmosphere than one where oil is used; but when there is a fog, which is the very time its services are needed most, the oil lamp asserts itself to advantage. Our local authorities, of course, have to provide for the normal rather than the abnormal; but this difference between the illuminants is one not to be lost sight of. Tho end this week of the volunteer year was marked, as far as the Metropolis was concerned, by several church parades, these having been placed in Sunday's orders for various corps. More interest than usual will be felt in the figures for the year when they become available, as it is of national concern to discover how the war has affected the Volunteer movement. Those who wish to develop the system of citizen sol- diering to the full entertain a hope—perhaps scarcely a lively hope—that the authorities at the War Office will so far profit by the lessons of the campaign as to do all that in them lies to encourage the Volunteers to higher and more organised exertions. At present they furnish the raw material for an admirable de- fensive force, capable even, in cases of national emergency, to assist in the offensive; but they need to be re-ordinated with the regular army in a closer fashion than merely on paper, and it is at this point that the War Office needs to be stirred. The much-talked-of "view from Richmond- hill," which, by this time, is almost as famous as the song-celebrated "Lass of Richmond Hill" of the century before last, is now apparently saved for all time from that destruction which seemed at one period to threaten it. The an- nouncement is made that Lord Dysart, who is the owner of certain manorial rights affecting "the view," intends to have introduced in the next Session of Parliament a bill which will give up all his remaining manorial rights over Ham and Petersham-commons and Ham-fields, as well as yielding to the public Petersham Meadow, immediately below Richmond-hill, and a strip of land, at least 200ft. wide, extend- ing for two miles along the bank of the Thames, from Twickenham Ferry to the One Tree, near Kingston, in return for which all common rights over the remainder of his estates in that district would be extinguished. The very names given in the scheme are redolent of poetry and romance; and those who do not know the Thames at Richmond-and they are to be sym- pathised with-can be assured that what is now to be done will be prized by Londoners for all time. R.

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