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FIELD AND FARM. j

I GARDENING GOSSIP.I

[No title]

I I 'i "AN INSANE -CUSTOM."…

■I VERDI'S OWN MEMORIAL. !

====================I HANDKERCHIEFS…

QUARRYMEN IN -DANGER.i

A SOCIETY MARRIAGE.

A GREEK HUSBANDMAN. !

[No title]

RESII !D,ENCE, 'lIl , .AT…

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RESII !D,ENCE, 'lIl AT HIGHBURY. The English Elustrated Magazine contains an inte- resting account of the grounds attached to Mr, Chamberlain's residence at Highbury, Birmingham. The writer, in the course of his remarks, says that when the house was built, not so long ago, it was an almost purely country prospect that the outlook took in. Since then, however, the view on one side has somewhat changed. Mr. Chamberlain himself, in sportive mood, on a public festive occasion lately at King's Heath, quoted the elder Mr. Weller's words as applicable to the township visible from the win- dows of his residence, and spoke of it as swelling wisibly." But all other houses are sufficiently far removed to give an air of remoteness to the resi- dence which is the subject of this sketch. For easi- ness of access, convenience of appointment, and charm of immediate surroundings, Highbury is almost an ideal dwelling for a public man. Here may be ensured entire freedom from noisy interrup- tion, and here, too, maybe found the true recreation which lies in congenial occupation to one who loves his gardens, as it is well known Mr. Chamberlain does. It is noteworthy that many of the leading states- men of late have been men of simple tastes, to whom trees and flowers and the grateful freshness of the country have afforded grateful change and relief from din of tongues and strife of party. Hughendeh, Hawarden, Hatfield-one thinks of these and many more; and to-day Highbury gives the likb relief to its owner and constant improver. The park is snug and pretty, and affords pasturage to a particularly fine herd of cattle, understood to be the special iiobby of Mr. Austen Chamberlain. Landscape gardening íhas had full exercise, and is still in] pro- gress. The owner is a much more active man than is generally known, and his supposed aversion to walking exercise does not prevent diligent perambula- tion of his own estate at least. There is a delightful lake in the park, and the tameness of the wild ducks (if such a contradiction in terms may be used) is evidence that the waterfowl lead an almost entirely undisturbed existence. The gardens themselves are extensive, how extensive may be partly gathered from the fact that some 25 gardeners are employed under the glass and on the ground," as one of them said, in addition to a number of men of more general occupation about the estate. The lawns and shrubberies are fall of delightful surprises-pretty hollows, secluded pools, picturesque groupings of shrubs and trees, wealth of foliage. One may wander in delight, and wonder what lovely thing will next be seen-for each winding path seems to lead to some fair spot more charming than the last. All the world has heard of Mr. Chamberlain's famed orchid-boases; but it is not a group of orchid- houses only that the visitor finds. Mrs. Chamberlain is as fond of flowers as her illustrious husband is and the latter is not a cultivator of orchids merely. Orchids there are, it is true, which are rare and ) valuable, but carnations are also favourite flowers at Highbury. Indeed, it would be difficult to say what flowers are not favourites, to judge by their variety and the care bestowed upon each kind. Immediately opening out of the drawing-room is the large con- servatory, sheltering tall palms and a bewilderingly beautiful collection of chrysanthemums and other flowers- Out of this blaze of light and brilliant colour one steps into a deliciously cool grotto-like place, where ferns and mosses line the walls, and where the tinkling music of dripping waters charms the ear. From this softly lit spot a long corridor, fringed and festooned with plants of many kinds, runs for a considerable distance. Along its side are doors, leading into houses," each sacred to its particular flower, orchids, begonias, cyclamens, primulas, foliage-plants—a house for each, and more than one for some. These are conservatories pure and simple for the display of flowers in bloom. The forcing- houses and greenhouses are elsewhere; and, to any- one conversant with the niceties of high-class gardening, are of the greatest interest.

!STORY OF THE AMERICA CUP.…

THE SILENT WOMAN.

[No title]

IGREATER BRITAIN.]

SAFFRON WALDEN ELECTION. -I

THE LEECH COLLECTION OF ;…

A PUBLISHER'S WILL.

BIRTH OF AN ITALIAN PRINCESS.