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OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT.…

NEWS NOTES.I

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I COUNTESS SHOT BY HER HUSBAND,…

ITHE WAR OFFICE. I

I DUKE OF MANCHESTER MARRIED.I

I THE NORTH SHIELDS MURDER.…

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THE CHARGE OF MURDER AT I…

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THE CHARGE OF MURDER AT YAEMOUTH. SENSATIONAL REPORTS DEPRECATED. I At Great Yarmouth Police-court, on Friday of last, week, Herbert John Bennett, 25, was charged, on remand, with the murder of his wife, Mary Jane, by strangling her on Yarmouth beach on September 52 last. Mr. Wiltshire, of Yarmouth, prosecuted on behalf of the Treasury; awd Mr. Robb, of Tunbridge Wells, defended. The Mayor presided, and there was a full bench of magistrates. Mr. Robb complained of the campaign of calumny against the accused on the part of certain organs of the Press. Mr. Wiltshire agreed in condemning these sensational reports, and the Mayor said they would not influence the magistrates. Mr. Wiltshire, in opening the case, explained how Bennett and his wife became acquainted, and spoke of differ- ences which arose between them at their various lodgings, during which the prisoner had been heard to wish his wife dead and to say that she soon would be if she did not look out. The prisoner afterwards took lodgings as a single man near London, and made the acquaint- ance of Alice Meadows, a parlourmaid, whom he engaged to marry, fixing the time at next Christmas. His wife went to live at Yarmouth, and on Sep- tember 22 the prisoner visited her there. They wenl out together at night, and were seen drinking to- gether at ten o'clock. Evidence would be given thil shortly before eleven o'clock a young couple whc were on the beach saw a ma,n and woman there and heard a woman's cry. They went home without interfering. At twelve o'clock Bennett called at the Crown and Anchor and took a bed, and left for London on the following morning. On that morning the dead body of Mrs. Bennett was found on the beach at the spot where the young couple would say that they had seen the man and woman on the pre- vious night. Evidence having been called the court adjourned till next morning. EVIDENCE OF THE ACCUSEb SWEETHEART. At Great Yarmouth Police-court on Saturday, Herbert John Bennett, 25, was again placed in the dock on a charge of having murdered his wife, Mary Jane, on Yarmouth beach on September 22 last. The mayor (Mr. Orde) presided, and there was again a full bench of magistrates. Mr. C. J. Wiltshire prosecuted for the Treasury and Mr. Robb, of Tunbridge Well, defended. Alice Amelia Meadows said was a single woman, living at Stepney. In June last she was a parlourmaid at Hyde Park terrace. She was introduced to the prisoner by a fellow servant. He told her that he was a grocer, but out of work just then. She believed him to be a single man. He said he had a cousin, and that that cousin had a wife and child at Bexley-heath. Aftei their first meeting in June they constantly met and wrote to each other. She sent him a telegram on his birthday, August 9. She sent it from Albion-street, Hyde-park. The prisoner told her that he had received another telegram on the same day as he got hers. He said that it came from his cousin at Bexley. The prisoner signed his letters to hei Herbert." She and Bennett came to Yarmouth on the Saturday before Bank Holiday. They travelled first-class and stayed at the Crown and Anchor Hotel. They occupied separate bedrooms. They returned to London together on the following Monday evening. The prisoner had given her a diamond and ruby ring. She recognised the ring produced as the one. It was given her on August 28 and was intended to mark their engagement. After the return to town the pri- soner told her that his cousin Fred's wife was ill. On August 28 she and Bennett went to Ireland. During the whole of the visit they occupied separate bedrooms. Bennett had plenty of money and spent it freely. He said that his mother had given him £500. They were in Ireland two weeks and then returned to London, going to Woolwich on the dal ifter their arrival in town. On September 14 Bennett said that he was going to Gravesend on th. Saturday as his grandfather was ill. She next saw Bennett on Sunday, the 16th, at half-past three in the ifternoon. He was wearing a blue coloured suit with striped trousers. He said his other clothei had been spoilt by his cousin breaking a bottle oi iodine over them. She next saw him on Thursday September 20, outside the house where she wa's in service. He asked her if she would not mind if hE did not come to see her the following Sunday morn- ing as he was going to see his grandfather, who was ill at Gravesend. The following letter was in Ben- nett's handwriting: Mr. Wiltshire said he would only read the material part of the letter, which was from the prisoner to Miss Meadows, and bore the Woolwich postmark of September 22. In it the prisoner said: "I shall go and see my grandfather to-morrow. I wish to hear from you as soon as you can get time to write, my dear. I shall be glad when this writing business ends, so as I can have you to welcome me in our own home. I am pleased to hear you are going to have somebody to cheer you up on Sunday, tear. I am very sorry I shall not be able to see you, dear, but I'll make up for it when I do see you." The letter was signed Your own loving, most affectionate Herbert." Miss Meadows, continuing her evidence, said that an the morning of Sunday, the 23rd, while she and it friend, Louisa Humphrey, were going through Hyde-park she saw Bennett. Sha was surprised Because he had said he was not coming. She asked aim why he was there. He replied that his father ind others were with his grandfather and that he was on his way there. He had waited about to meet her. While in Ireland the prisoner proposed that they should get married in the following June. Shown another letter, she said she received it from Bennett. It was dated September 23, from 41 Union-street, Woolwich, and was as follows My own darling Alice,—I received your kind and loving letter this evening and was quite pleased to hear from you, as it cheers me up. I ari ived home quite safe, but was not at all happy. I am glad you have some one to pass the time away with, dearest, as you would have felt very miserable after seeing me as you did. I shall be glad indeed, my darling, when you don't have to leave me at all, for I feel quite miserable now that I have to wait so long to see you. I shall be up on Thursday evening, dearest, all being well, as I am at present on day work and I hope I shall keep at day work, as it is much better. I have been to Bexley-heath, dear, and am sorry to tell you grandfather passed away this morning at 3.30 a.m. and is to be buried on Monday next, when I shall not be able to attend as I must not lose any more time at present, I hope you are feeling better, my darling, I shall be glad to see you out of a place altogether. Don't take any notice of Kitty and be sure and don't get miserable. Give my love to mother and all at home when you write. I hope they are all quite well. I must now close, my dearest, as it is getting late. I hope to see you on Thursday, when I shall have lots of news. With kindest love and kisses, I remain your most loving and affectionate Herbert." Miss Meadows said sht, next saw Bennett on Thursday, September 27, when he gav3 her a gold brooch. On the following Sunday it was arranged that they should get married at Christmas. Other letters from the prisoner to Miss Meadows were put in. In one of them the prisoner said he had sent her a cape and skirt and sealskin cape. Miss Meadows, who identified a cape which was shown to her, said that on October 9 she wrote thanking the prisoner for the clothes. He said he had got the things from his cousin, who was going to South Africa. On October 17 she met the prisoner at Woolwich. He said he had been to Bexley. She left her situation on October 18, and a home was taken at Charlton, a deposit of £ 2 being paid by Bennett. She first heard of this occurrence on the beach at Yarmouth on Sunday, November 4. On that day Bennett was at her mother's house. Her two brothers were there also. Her sister referred to the affair, and said it was funny that nothing had been heard of the Yarmouth murderer. Bennet made no reference to the affair. While at Woolwich on November 7 she heard that Bennett had been arrested. She did not know that Bennett had a wife until she heard it from the police after his arrest. He never referred to his wife or child to her. Mr. Wiltshire then put in some other letters written by Bennett to Miss Meadows. Mrs. Elliston, the wife of a policeman at Plum- stead, recalled and shown a brooch, said that she had seen Mrs. Bennett wearing it. Mrs. Bennett said it had been made in South Africa. Mrs. McDonald, of Woolwich-road, recalled, stated that she had seen the same brooch on a lady whom she knew as "Mrs. Bartlett" in July and August, when Mrs. Bartlett" had a flat in the same house. Mr. Bartlett" came home, but only stayed one night. John Rudrum, shoemaker, Yarmouth, stated that on Saturday, September 15, a woman whose photo- graph he now recognised came to lodge at his house. lie "first saw her on the night of September 15 with a man at the end of the row. He did not take any particular notice of the man. The woman remained all the week. He saw her on Saturday, September 22, at dinner time and he believed at tea time, but not afterwards. She went by the name of Mrs. Hood. She did not come home to sleep that night. On the following morning the police came to his house and he went with them to the mortuary, where he saw the body of a woman which he recognised as that of Mrs. Hood. He no", identified the clothing produced as hers. CUSTODY OF PRISONER'S CHILD. I As the Court was about to rise Mr. Eobb macis an application with respect to the infant child of the prisoner. He said that the prisoner, who was the natural guardian of the child, was desirous that the custodv of it should be entrusted to his father. Mr, John J-ames Bennett, of Swanscombe, Kent. Chief Constable Parker, of Yarmouth, wished the matter to be mentioned before giving any direction to the people now having the child. Bennett had executed a formal appointment of his father as guardian. Mr. Wiltshire said he had no instructions from the Treasury in the matter. The child was in good hands, and perhaps it would be better to leave it so until the judge at the assizes gave some direction. Mr. Clarke, the mother's father, wished to have the child (Ruby). The Mayor said he was advised that any decision he might give would be inoperative, and therefore it was useless for him to giveany direction. The prisoner was remanded until Friday of this week.

I THE CRISIS IN CHINA. I

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-¡¡¡ SETTLED AT LAST.

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-UNCLE SAM'S FAMILY.

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