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OUII LONDON CORRESPONDENT.…

NEWS NOTES., -

ARE DREAMS INHERITED? I

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I -A DEATH-BED CONFESSION.…

GOVERNMENT MATRIMONIAL AGENT.

\CURIOUS KRUGER STORY.

ITHE BROUGHTON CHEST AT THE…

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THE BROUGHTON CHEST AT THE BRITISH MUSEUM. The British Museum, at least in its manuscript department, appears (says a correspondent of the St. James's Gazette) to be understaffed. In addition to the Douce box, of which everyone has heard, there was another chest recently opened-that of Lord Broughton. It is stated by the museum authorities that the papers left in this latter chest will not be ready for public inspection for some twelve months. This seems a needlessly long time to wait. On in- quiry at the British Museum it was stated that cer- tain papers of the Broughton collection, as in many other similar cases, will almost certainly be kept, not only from the public view, but from the researches of the student, the historian, or the journalist. Questioned on this point, the secretary of the museum, Mr. J. F. Tavlor, said that letters, in certain cases, were kept from the public for reasons of public policy and for several other reasons which he could not exactly state. But cannot the student get access to these papers if he gives a guarantee that what he reads will not be used publicly by him until the necessary permis- sion is given ? I should like* to inspect Lord Broughton's collection to see if there is anything bearing on the Byron controversy." There are no Byron letters in the Broughton chest, and if there were, and it was decided to hold them back, no student would be permitted to see them." The state- ment that there are no Byron letters in the chest must be accepted, but it is confidently believed that Lord Broughton did write a reply to Lady Byron's letter, and this is exactly what we should expect to find in the chest. It will be noticed also that only "Byron letters" are cited as being absent from the collection. Nothing is said of any ether Byron documents or any matter incidentally allud- ing to Byron. Considering that Lord Broughton was on terms of great personal intimacy with Byron, and accompanied the poet on his travels, the assump- tion is that there must in his literary remains be some reference to the writer of "Childe Harold." In any case facilities for examining such documents as are withheld from the public should be given to those literary students or historians who can furnish a suitable guarantee. The withholding of such per- mission gives rise to the contention sometimes urged that certain literary favourites of the museum authorities have first call upon such documents before it has been decided that the public may safely see them.

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| ART AND LITERATURE.

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) RUSSIANISING PORT ARTHUR.

I AERONAUTS' EXCITING TIME.

-' -NOTED BUT NOT NOTICED.

NATAL AND THE DOMESTIC PROBLEM.

FIVE GENERATIONS IN A HOUSE

ELECTRICITY AND WATCHES.

!GERMAN ENTERPRISE. ---

THE NEW CURE AT THE LONDON…

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