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. . THE CHINESE CRISIS. I

THE KHEDIVE IN LONDON.

CONVOCATION OF CANTERBURY.

MURDERED BY CHINESE.

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ITHE WAR. I

TERRIBLE FIRE AT NEW -YORK.-

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-EPITOME OF NEWS. I

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EPITOME OF NEWS. I A WRITER in the Manchester Guardian tell a otiriotie IItory of r'he coincidence" kind in connection with the death of the Earl of Airiie. Th- E,-trl for five years held the position of adjutant of a Yeomanry cavalry regiment. This regiment has just been out for its annual training. One day last week the attempt to hoist the colours of the regiment before the tent of the commanding officer was attended by failure. Again and again was the attempt made, but the flag persisted in flying half-mast high. This attracted so much attention thatniessengers|were sent from neigh- bouring camps to know if anything had befallen the regiment. Before night fell news came of the death of the regiment's old adjutant, the Earl of Airlie. NOWADAYS it is extremely hard for a criminal prosecution to originate in the Court of Queen's Bench, but that; this may still happen is illustrated by the proceedings the other day before the Lord Chief Justice, when the Middlesex Grand Jury were summoned to consider an indictment preferred against a person for alleged offences committed abroad. It was the practice till 1872 for the Middlesex Grand Jury to be summoned into the Court of Queen's Bench every term, but as it very seldom happened that there were any indictments for them to consider, a statute was passed in the yeaL' mentioned removing the necessity for their convocation unless their ser- vices were actually required. One of the last in- stances in which they had any notable case to consider was in 1866, when they ignored the volumin- ous indictment preferred against Governor Eyre for his conduct in repressing the Jamaica insurrection. THE original Dutch settlement in South Africa was in Cape Colony, where the Hollanders first went in 1652. After the revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV. there was an exodus of Huguenots from France in 1688, and they, too, settled in Cape Colony. The French and the Dutch never got along well there together, and in 1709 the use of French in addressing the Government was forbidden. In 1724 the French religious services were finally prohibited. Many of the Cape Colony Huguenots emigrated to other parts of Africa, and gradually the Dutch ab- sorbed both the French and their language. In the main only French proper names now survive in the Cape Colony and the Transvaal. General Joubert is of ancient exiled Huguenot stock. Da Beer and Du Troitspan, whose farms were despoiled when dia- monds were first found at Kimberley, were of Hugue- not extraction. CAPTAIN MALCOLM, of the Argyll and Sutherland 1I ighlanders, has been invalided home from South Africa. He went out a magnificent specimen of humanity he returns a living tribute to the triumphs of surgical skill owing to injuries to his leg, which necessitated upwards of a dozen operations, and the extraction of no fewer than five inches of bone. How the gallant Captain will get about minus so much bone is a mystery only known to the clever surgeons who operated upon him. Mr. Malcolm, who is the son of Colonel Malcolm, of Wingfleld, and brother of the honourable member for Stow- market, was the fellow-companion on his hazardous journey through China and Tibet of Captain M. S. Wellby, of the 18th Hussars, who is now in South Africa. IN writing about the" Boxers" in the Asiatic Quarterht Review Mr. E. H. Parker draws attention to a matter which some might think of no more poli- tical consequence than a false quantity in Latin verse. The author, however, is so great an authority on Chinese that he knows what he is talking about. Patriotic Peace Fists is the English translation of i-ho-k'iien, and in Mr. Parker's opinion the use of the word i is ominus of evil to the Manchu dynasty, for this term has always been employed by patriots,' such as those who turned out the Turks in 620 and the Mongols in 1360. The original idea of the Central Government was to develop a defensive patriotism against the Germans and Christians, notably the Catholics, who have now been idiotically provided by the imbecile Chinese Government with an official status, giving them illimitable power to in- trigue and create mischief; but the reforming and revolutionary element surreptitiously regard the i as referring to Chinese rights against those of Manchus, and it is impossible for the old women of the Tsting- li-Yamen to say how far blustering generals like Tung Fu-siang may not take this objectionable view of the word i." THill extreme near-sightedness of Camille Saint- Saens, the well-known French composer, is illustrated by the following story, given by the Liverpool Daily Post. Being asked to play something at a party in Paris, he extemporised for an hour in the most brilliant fashion. Then some of the guests began to leave, and after two hours the rest took their depar- ture. The hostess retired to bed, and the master of the house alone remained in the room, butstill Saint- SaeJM, lost in his musical reverie, and not perceiving that the guests had departed, played on. At last, about 2 a.m., seeing Saint-Saens playing with more ardour than ever, the host, completely overcome with fatigue, became desperate, and said I beg pardon, my dear sir, but pray are you not a little fatigued ?" Saint-Saens replied, without leaving the piano, "Not in the least. 1" and, to show how fresh he was, struck into a new inprovisation with wilder euthusiasm than ever. The host gave it up, stole out of the room, and went to bed. At daybreak, Saint-Saens rose, gravely J bowed to the tables and chairs, and went home, com- pletely ignorant that the chair and tables had been for hours his only audience. A BOY who was bitten by an adder near Angers, in the north-west of France, died four hours later after terrible sufferings. Two ladies have opened a weaving establishment at Canterbury, in the hope of reviving an industry which formerly flourished there. ARTHUR BADEN-POWELL POWELl, and Edith Pre- toria Hall figure on the baptismal register at Hinck- ley. THE Atbara River has com"" down in full flood, causing the Nile to rise twelve inches at Berber. THE Bishop of Waiapu, New Zealand, says that he has more hopes now of the Maoris as Christians than he has had for many years. GROUSE disease has made its appearance on the Glenfiddieh moors, in Banffshire, the property of the Duke of Richmond and Gordon. GENERAL BOOTH has directed the Salvation Army throughout the world to pray for peace in China, and the protection of missionaries and converts. THE trustees of the Duke of Bridgewater have had a powerful electric light installation put down at their Bridgewater Colliery. THE rumour that General Liebert, Governor of German East Africa, will retire after his return to Germany is again current in Berlin. LORD LAMINGTON, the Governor of Queensland, contemplates making an extended tour in the northern parts of the Colony in August. His Excel- lency is anxious to see the Gulf Country, and also Cape York Peninsula. DURING the stay of the Warwickshire Regiment at Prieska, a little dog attached himself to the column, and on their departure he followed the troops all the way on foot from Pri'/ska to De A.ar, a distance of about 100 miles. (In seeing the faithful little animal had fallen in love with the regiment, the latter formally annexed him as the regimental pet, and brought him away by train. Strange to say (adds the Bloemfontein Post), the little fellow will have nothing to do with anyone not in khaki. THERE is at present reposing in the guard room at Stormberg Junction Station an interesting relic of the war, which was picked up in the Boer Laager after its desertion, and which consists (says the Bloemfon- tein Post) of a rough tablet of soft sandstone, on which the following inscription had been rudely en- graven Gedenkteeken op gericht door Bethulie en Burghersdorp Burghers op 16 de Dec. Del Heer is our banier." (Memorial stone erected by Bethulie and Burghersdorp burghers on December 16. The Lord is our banner). DURING a thunderstorm near Consett, in the North Durham district, the lightning struck a pabture field and dug a trench varying from 3ft. to 3ft. 6in. deep, and 6in. or 7in. wide, across the field for a distance of a dozen feet. The solid clay was scattered in all directions, portions thereof being found lying over 20 yards away, while the ttirf had been cut up as clean as if the work had been done by a sharp im- plement. One grass sod, measuring about 6ft. long and 9in. in width, was laid on the opposite side of the fence in another field. OBERAMMKRGATJ has lost its burgomaster and manager of the Passion Play by the death of Johann Lang, who, it was declared, was responsible for the modern realistic form of presenting the great story. Lang was first, chosen burgomaster in 1866, and held the highest office in his commune for three years. In 1879 he was re-elected to the post, which he con- tinued to hold until his death. At each of the four performances of the play, 1860 to 1890, Lang imper- sonated Caiaphas, and gave what was universally de- scribed ns a remarkably fine rendering of the charac- ter of the High Priest.

FLIRTING TO STOP.

ILIGHTNING DANGERS.I

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A SERVANT GIRL'S MILLIONS.

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-_.-_-.-NEW ORANG AT THE ZOO.

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-THE REVENUE.

JOHN ROBERTS'S BANKRUPTCY.

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AWAY .TO THE FAR ANTARCTIC.