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. . THE CHINESE CRISIS. I

THE KHEDIVE IN LONDON.

CONVOCATION OF CANTERBURY.

MURDERED BY CHINESE.

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ITHE WAR. I

TERRIBLE FIRE AT NEW -YORK.-

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TERRIBLE FIRE AT NEW YORK. ATLANTIC LINERS DESTROYED. t. FIGHTING FOR LIFE. 200 BURNED AND DROWNED. The full extent of the loss of life and property occasioned by the burning of the North German- Lloyd Company's docks and steamers at Hoboken on Saturday is yet unknown. Probably between 150 and 200 men, chiefly sailors and longshoremen, have been drowned or burned in the ships, and 6,000,000dols. worth of damage has been done. The steamships Saale and Main have been practic- ally destroyed, and the Bremen has been burned from the main deck up the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse has been only slightly damaged. The Saale was to sail for Boston on Saturday to take the Christian Endeavourers to Cherbourg. The flames began in a number of cotton bales on the southern pier, and swept rapidly, fanned by a strong wind over two other piers, where the iour ships lay. The Kaiser Wilhelm was first towed out, and the flames on her upper works were soon ex- tinguished by the crew. The Saale was now all ablaze, and the men cut her loose. The Main burned at the dock. The Hamburg-American Company's docks ad- jacent were saved by the destruction of the inter- vening pier shed. Messrs. Campbells' storehouse, a fine brick building full of jute and whisky, was destroyed, and a dozen or more loaded lighters were burned. Many stories are told of terrible sufferings. A large number of men were caught while working in the hold of the Saala. A hundred are thought to have been below the main deck, others jumped over- board, and were saved. Captain Mirrow is the only officer believed to have been lost. The faces of the imprisoned men could be seen at the portholes cry- ing for help unavailingly. About 50 were rescued through the burning hatchways. Paul Stoenberg, a sailor, said: There were 40 of us. We had just lunched and gone forward to work in the hold, when someone shouted, Get out, everybody! The ship is on flre I A scramble followed. Every man was turned into a devil, and ran fighting, clawing, scratching, and swearing for the ladder to the deck. They found the hatches battened down. Great God! how the men did curse Some climbed the ladder, and pounded with their fists against the iron hatch till the blood ran. Through the gratings we saw the llames-fire forward, fire in the stern, fire everywhere. Some of the men started forward. They had to pass over the coal bins, and half the way could walk, but half the way had to stoop, and at last crawl on their bellies. There were 40 men struggling like rats in a black hole, with no air, and everybody fighting and cursing. We crawled through the machinery, and got upon the pumps forward. There were 40 men, and room for only 15. One man tried to pull me down. I kicked his face in. Men tried to climb. Others kicked them down. The man that fell first was stamped on like a coal. Outside we could hear the crackling of the flames, and firemen shouting. I thought they could never reach us. It was like hell down there. Men tore their clothes off, and then after a while stopped cursing, and began praying. The men at the bottom fought no more. One by one they lay still. It was like months from four o'clock till after seven. Then we heard the firemen above. After a while they put down a ladder. I got out. I hope others got out. Forty bodies were taken from the hold." On Sunday 16 men on the Main were taken out alive after several hours in the coal bunkers in the midst of the terrible heat. One had his eyes scalded out. Others in the upper bunkers were burned or suffocated. The company insures its own ships. The Cunard DOGk has been lent temporarily, but plans are still undecided. The damage done by the fire is declared to be enormous, and the estimated loss is placed at between 10,000,000dol. and 20,000,000dol. The figures vary widely owing to the confusion that exists. Already 25 bodies have been recovered, but only a few of these have been identified. The entire pier system of the North German Lloyd, with a frontage of a quarter of a mile, has been destroyed. The flames swept over the three piers of the North German Lloyd and the liners lying there in little more than a few minutes, cutting off about 750 longshoremen and abont 1000 other people. Satur- day was visiting day on the vessels, and the docks were crowded with men, women, and children anxious to see the officers and crews of the vessels. Hundreds jumped into the water, and there were many marvel- lous escapes. The rescuing of the huge Kaiser Wilhelm der u Grosse was an especially brilliant piece of work. Most of the officers were on board at the time, and when the alarm was given they at once sought, their posts. Captain Engelbart took his station on the bridge, and shouted his directions for cutting the cables and moving the tugs. The sailors, with hoses and hand-grenades, protected the sides of the liner at the risk of their lives. The canvas and wood- work of the vessel often caught fire, and had the men been less prompt the vessel would not have been saved. The officers and crew, after getting their vessel into the river, rescued many. Among fany wonderful escapes was that of 29 firemen from e stokehole of the Saale. That vessel was towed out into the stream with dozens of people clinging to her rudder. The "floats" fought the flames for four hours, while the stokers in the hold faced death from fire and water. Finally they mounted on each others' shoulders, and, forming a human rope, drew one another up in safety. It was reported, however, that 70 others perished in the hold. Seventeen persons were taken off the Bremen alive on Sunday. They had been lying with their bodies under water, and only a portion of their faces above the surface to allow of breathing. INHUMANITY AT THE FIRE. The loss of life by the great dock fire at Hoboken (according to Tuesday's Times) is variously estimated at from 200 to 400. Most of those who perished lived in Germany, and the records of the burned ships have probably been destroyed by the fire. The crews of tugs are denounced for demanding money from drowning men. Inhumanity of the worst cha- racter is alleged against those engaged in salvage attempts.

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-EPITOME OF NEWS. I

FLIRTING TO STOP.

ILIGHTNING DANGERS.I

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A SERVANT GIRL'S MILLIONS.

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-_.-_-.-NEW ORANG AT THE ZOO.

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-THE REVENUE.

JOHN ROBERTS'S BANKRUPTCY.

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AWAY .TO THE FAR ANTARCTIC.