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I FIELD AJN1) FARM.

I GARDENING GOSSIP.

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THE AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS…

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THE AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS ACT. PROPOSED AMENDMENTS. I A deputation has waited on Mr. Long, President of the Board of Agriculture, from the Central Chamber of Agriculture, for the purpose of urging the introduction during the present session of a bill to amend the Agricultural Holdings Act. The depu- tation consisted of 53 delegates, representing not only the Central Chamber, but local chambers throughout the country. Mr. A. F, Jeffreys, M.P., introduced the deputa- tion, explaining that it came there in consequence of a resolution passed by the Central Chamber. About 30 chambers were represented. They did not wish any great change in the Act, but a simplification of its provisions. He alluded to the beneficial effects of the Diseases of Animals Act. Mr. W. Lipscomb (Yorkshire) reviewed the legis- tion of the subject. The present Act had failed from the ignorance of those who administered it. He handed the president a report made by the Special Committee of the Chamber, and suggested that the amendments should take the lines of that report. Mr. Channing, M.P., said the Act should define more clearly the rights of landlords and tenants as regards tenants' improvements. The change in methods of agriculture also made it necessary that amendments should be affected. He suggested that the bill should be introduced early, so that agricul- turists could fully discuss it. Mr. Clare Sewell Read (East Anglia) said they did not expect the bill to pass this year it would be suffi- cient if it were introduced. Mr. C. Middleton (Yorks Cleveland), Mr. W. W. Berry (Kent), and Mr. S. Kidner (West Country), also spoke. Mr. Long, in reply, said he was glad to hear the health of the country was so good, and that the measure which had brought that about was so much appreciated. The difficulties which had faced them had occurred in other countries, and had been there found insuperable, but these had been removed in this country, and he believed permanently removed. As a rale, a Minister could feel nothing but gratitude when', a Deputation came to him to strengthen his hands. On the present occasion his satisfaction was very much tempered, because of their recommendation being limited in its effect to the introduction of a bill that session. A large number of members of Parlia- ment believed that would be fatal to the bill, and, though favourable to the proposed legislation, did not agree that the bill should be introduced at this late period of the session. The work of the Government was carried on by agreement among the Ministers, who arranged what legislation should be proceeded with. He was doing his best for agriculture, and he challenged them to point to a Government which had done more for agriculture than the present one in the last four years. He was, there- fore, a little disappointed in regard to some of the expressions which had been used. They had, however, exercised their discretion in press- ing that on him. They wished, in the first place, that there should be legislation to amend the Agricultural Holdings Act, and next that it should be introduced this session. He must say that he had never made a speech dealing with the general subject of agriculture without stating, in the most precise and definite terms that he knew how to command, that it was the intention of the Government to deal with that question, and that he had studied it and had a bill ready to be introduced. When he found speakers doubting if such statements had been made, it made him feel that no explicit terms were enough. He could not be more explicit than he had been already. He had long been familiar with the admir- able report which had been handed to him that day. They had studied and digested it and appreciated its great value. They would deal with the whole ques- tion shortly, and, they hoped, in such a fashion as to render further legislation unnecessary. He did not think that more criticism was needed than they already had in the Chamber's Report. He had believed that agiculturists were inclined to be pessi- mistic, but there was no sign of that in their sugges- tion that the bill would be a non-controversial mea- sure. There was no subject which was likely to be so controversial as any question of land tenure. He felt that the fault in the existing Act was due to the methods by which it was applied rather than to any failings in the Act itself. There were, however, faults which did require removing, and the Act gene- ratly brought up to the modified condition of things. But he could not see his way to introduce the bill this 'session, as it would only lead to useless contro- versy. He considered his colleagues and he were pledged to deal with that question, and he hoped to do so next session. If they had not already dealt with it, it was because they considered other matters should come first.

SIR EDWARD HULSE'S WILL. I

IWASTE OF BREAD BY SOLDIEPS.

IPOSTPONEMENT OF A ROYALI…

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A FIGHT THAT FAILED.

OPERATIONS ON SALISBURY PLAIN.…

AN ARTIST'S WILL. I

AUTHORS' CLUB, I

MELODRAMA AND REALISM. I

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I THE MANACLES ROCKS.

ISERVANTS' WAGES. I

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ILONDON'S POOR.-

IPRESENTS TO THE QUEEN.

ITHE UGANDA RAILWAY.

CAPTURED BY CANNIBALS.-

ITRANS-AFRICAN TELEGRAPH.

IREMARKABLE LIKENESS.

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