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THE" TOMB OF ROMULUS." I

DECREASE OF RABIES. 1

FAMORA. I

;THE CANCER SERUM. I

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AFFAIRS IN FRANCE. I

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AFFAIRS IN FRANCE. I RETURN OF CAPTAIN DREYFUS. I After more than four terrible years of exile Captain Dreyfus is once more on French soil. He was landed from the Sfax in the early hours of Saturday morning, being brought ashore in a beating rain at Port Haliguen. The scores of journalists who for the last fortnight had been doing night duty at Rennes and transmitting telegrams more credit- able to their ingenuity than to their professional pro- bity had been (says the Times correspondent) entirely thrown off the scent by the officials entrusted tilth the arrangements f-)r this historic scene. Yet Paris was flooded with "copy from writers pro- testing that they alone were present when Captain Dreyfus landed. Much of this false information must already have travelled round the world. The exact record of what really occurred is of itself sufficiently dramatic to make rhetoric unnecessary in its pre- sentation. Moreover, in all this mass of reporting there is but a single article stating things as they y are. The Matin alone of all the morning papers on Saturday had authentic information as to the place of Captain Dreyfus's arrival, and the Temps was the sole journal in a position to give details of that arrival. M. Henry Ceard, the author, spends his summers on the peninsula of Quiberon at the little port of Port Haliguen, and it is to his initiative in tele- graphing that the Temps owes its distinction in being on this occasion so well informed. He says Dreyfus landed during the night under my windows at Port Haliguen, Quiberon. His arrival did not surprise us, for at six o'clock last evening some fishermen who had come in from the open sea brought news that they had encountered the Sfax. Immediately the entire population, about 150 persons, went down to the quay. An hour- two hours—went by. The Sfax did not arrive. At nine o'clock a closed barouche drawn by two white horses stopped in front of the harbour. M. Viguie, the head of the detective department, alighted. At the same time there appeared from the village a company of the 116th Regiment of the line, which had come from the fort of Penthievre, and numerous gendarmes, who cleared the quay. The weather was terrible. The wind was blowing a gale, and a heavy rain was falling, while the night became darker and darker, and behind the Line of the soldiers the popu- lace became tired of waiting. Eleven o'clock struck, then midnight. We still heard nothing but the whistle of the wind, and beheld no gleam on the sea. The most intrepid inhabitants left the spot. Finally in front of the sea there was no one but the troops, waiting silently in the rain for the end of their task. "At 1.45 a small boat appears. The men bring the boat to land. Dreyfus is in their midst. By the light of a beacon I see him, clad in a waterproof and wearing a soft felt hat. He leaves the boat and between two gendarmes climbs slowly and with a tired air the steps leading up to the quay to the barouche brought by M. Viguié. He gets in, and the troops sur- round the carriage, which moves off, the horses walk- ing, towards the Quiberon Station, a short distance from Port Haliguen. A special train will take Captain Dreyfus to Rennes." Such was the return of Captain Dreyfus to France. As will shortly be seen, he probably knew not even where he was nor whither he was bound. He may have expected to arrive in France acclaimed by his countrymen. He only knew that he was to be tried once more by Court-martial. He had left these shores in a whirlwind ef execration. He returns in a tempest of wind and rain, ignorant of all that has taken place during the last two years. But let us not anticipate. I interrupt the narrative, however, for the moment to give the official account of the events of this historic night, for it confirms what I had already said to the effect that the Sfax was to be met out at sea by a vessel with sealed orders. "M. Viguie, head of the detective department, left Rennes on Friday, not for Paris, nor for Brest, but for the peninsula of Quiberon, where he arrived in the evening. Last night (Friday) at nine o'clock a Government vessel stationed at Lorient, the Caudan, was in Quiberon roads and received orders to make for the west in order to meet the Sfax, which had been signalled by the semaphores. The weather was abominable, and gave ground for fears that the transfer of the prisoner would be impossible. From 9.30 p.m. to 1.30 a.m., the lights of the Caudan and those of the Sfax were seen in the offing, but the two vessels seemed unable to reach each other. On the harbour breakwater, where were MM. Vigui6 and Ilennion, a Paris police commissary, gendarmes, and inspectors of police, the weather was likewise very bad, and it was considered dangerous to send out a boat. At 1.30 a.m. a boat manned by 10 men, urder a naval officer, left the Government ship and re;: he the Sfax off Port Haliguen, Shortly afterwarus this boat returned to the coast, where a company of the 116th Infantry was in waiting under the orders of Captain Sauge. Dreyfus was finally landed and handed over to a Lorieat captain of engineers, a quartermaster, and an officer of gendarmie. The prisoner was then handed over to M. Vigui6, and took his place in a two-horse cirriage brought over from Auray by the detectives. There were three detectives in the carriage." The Figaro correspondent has interviewed M. Viguie, and learned from him that Captain Sauge, the same officer who accompanied Captain Dreyfus to Saint Martin de R6 four years ago, found the prisoner little altered. He seemed uncertain of his footing, as happens after a long voyage, but this was all. He did not speak, but saluted the officials as he passed. A sanitary official protested, wishing to detain him under the quarantine regulations, but M. Vigui6 made short work of this busybody. As the captain passed before M. Viguie he said, Pardon, monsieur," in a quiet, firm voice, and saluted. The special train bringing Captain Dreyfus stopped at 5.30 at a level crossing about two miles from Rennes, where the Prefect was in readiness with four carriages. Captain Dreyfus was put into one with two gendarmes and an officer. The Prefect, M. Viguie,and M. Hennion entered a second,and the police inspectors filled the others. The gendarmes on horseback were placed as escort round the second carriage rather than the first in order to mislead the public. In this order and in these conditions Captain Dreyfus was driven into Rennes, where lie arrived at five minutes past six without the slightest demon- stration of any sort, favourable or hostile. Here let us follow the account given by the Temps reporter The whole thing passed with astonishing rapidity. Nevertheless, the descent of Captain Dreyfus from the carriage was not so quick that we were unable to catch a glimpse of him at the moment when he entered the doorway of the military prison. Captain Dreyfus is not by any means in the lamentable condition which some have recently depicted. I do not pre- tend to say that he did not give me the impression of a man whose health has been affected, psrhaps seriously; but his general appearance and his phy- siognomy seemed to me to denote a man who, though he has suffered, has succeeded in forcing upon himself an incredible power of resis- tance. Anaemic, thin, and bent-that he certainly is; but, though his complexion is tanned, and though he may seem blcodless under his bronzed skin, he gave when he drew him- self up and planted his foot firmly on the pave- ment the impression of a man whose energy, character, and force of will had overcome his physical weaknesses. His step remains firm and his eyes are still keen, but a short, fair beard in- clined to reddish changes the appearance on the face which I saw on the terrible day of his degrade- tion. His hair is greyer, but he does not seem to have much aged. Captain Dreyfus wore a blue suit and a grey overcoat, and the brim of his suft felt hat was turned down so as to hide his face." Some particulars may here be given of his voyage. The Sfax left Cayenne on June 10, and stopped on the 18th at Cape St. Vincent in order to coal. There Captain Coffinieres de Nordeck received telegraphic instructions to land the prisoner at Port Haliguen and to reach it at nine p.m. on the 30th. This was accordingly done, but the Caudan was two hours in discovering the lights of the Sfax. Captain Dreyfus occupied an officer's cabin. Nobody was allowed to speak to him; he himself scarcely uttered a word, and he had to write for anything he wanted. In the daytime he was allowed to walk on the bridge, two sailors watching him. At night a sentry was posted at the door of his cabin. He had a fair appetite, and expressed great delight on learning that he was about to land. The Sfax has gone on to Brest, where Captain Coffinieres de Nordeck has furnished some further details. Dreyfus, he says, stoops a little, has become balder, and has aged a little, but is in good spirits. On his departure from Cayenne lie seemed broken down, but this was from having been very seasick in the boat which took him from the He de Diablfl. ThA nnt.A-bnnlr of an officer describes him as scorntul and sarcastic. At nine a.m. on June 9 he went on board the Sfax with a firm step, gave the military salute, was conducted to the cabin, undressed, and went to bed. On awaking, he wrote a letter in a firm hand and signed Captain Dreyfus," asking what the regulations were for the voyage. "There is extraordinary energy," says the captain, in this man, and during 20 days he gave no sign of weakness." His promenades were from nine o'clock to ten, eleven to noon, and five to six, but the captain humanely lengthened these a little, and during the two days' stay at St. Vincent allowed him to sit under an awning on the second bridge. He could go to bed when he chose, but the nine o'clock promenade was compulsory and was preceded by the doctor's visit. The cabin contained a bed, toilet-table, and cupboard, and he made his own bed. He was allowed to smoke. Lieutenant Champagnac gave fcim the first information that he would be tried over again. He did not move a muscle, and was very reserved. He said, however: "I have no grudge against anybody," and he added that he should be glad to re-enter the army, which he had never ceased to love. H< did not utter a word respecting his trial. His self-control astonished all the officers. He spent his time in reading. Lieutenant Cham- ( pagnac lent him books. In a letter written when returning a book on the colonies he expressed an opinion respecting the Mekong, and a few hours before landing he returned a book unread, saying that it was dry. He did not know where he was to land. Dreyfus did not speak, but wept while in the train. On Dreyfus's arrival at Rennes the prefect sent word to Mme. Dreyfus that she could see him that morning. Accordingly, at half-past eight, her father, mother, and brother walked with her to the prison. She alone was admitted to his cell on the first storey, and she remained till 10.15. A captain of gendarmerie was present, but discreetly kept at a distance. She is said to have found him less altered than she ex- pected, but she seemed much dejected on leaving the prison. She paid a second y'sit in the afternoon, but future visits are limited to three a week. M. Zola's new trial, which had been fixed for the 14th, will be postponed for three months, his counsel, M. Labori, having to defend Dreyfus. M. Coppee, M. Barres, M. Forain, M. Lemaitre, and other friends of M. Dereulede's offered him a banquet at St. Cloud, in which he delivered a charac- teristic speech attacking Parliamentarism. Even supposing," he said, that the traitor Dreyfus is not a traitor, what other regime than ours would have allowed the hideous leprosy to poison the blood of an entire people ? In what other country under what other Government, would the solution have been so long delayed ? If none of us has tried to obstruct ex-Captain Dreyfus's return to be tried by his military judges it is because we have no doubt of the loyalty, the independence, an& the honour of the officers of our army. We are ready to regard their verdict as definitive, but it is necessary that all the consequences of this ferdict should be drawn. If Dreyfus is admitted to be innocent, no chastisement is terrible enough, no pillory infamous enough for all the Ministers, civil and military, who have accused Dreyfus or allowed him to be accused of a crime which he did not commit. All reprisals would be excusable, or tortures legitimate, and as for the martyr, their victim, there are no honours great enough, no rehabilitation complete enough for him. A verdict of not guilty should be not only an acquittal but an exaltation; it will be an apotheosis. Only, no secrets, no reticences. No more interven- tions of the foreigner; none of those shameful menaces of declarations of war." A PKINCEIjY INVITATION. Captain Dreyfus was on Monday visited in the prison at Rennes by his lawyers, Maitres Demange pd Labori. The former described the prisoner as looking better than he expected, and said there were but few signs of the sufferings he has undergone. The two advocates informed the prisoner of the main points of his case of which he has been kept in ignorance. Captain Dreyfus is stated to have ex- pressed himself confident of his acquittal by the court-martial. The decision of the Court of Cassa- tion granting a revision of his trial was formally notified to him by the Government Commissary on Monday. The Prince of Monaco has written to Madame Dreyfus inviting her husband to stay at his summer palace at the close of his trial. PROBABLE DATE OF TUB TRIAL. The middle of August is now spoken of as the pro- bable" date for the trial of Captain Dreyfus. The Chambers were on Tuesday prorogued for the sum- mer recess. Me. Labori had long conferences with Captain Dreyfus on Tuesday, and the last named has been placed in possession of the verbatim report of the proceedings before the Court of Cassation and of the volumes of evidence connected with the Zola and Esterhazy cases. It is stated that the prisoner's memory is becoming clearer regarding the events of four years ago, and that he is gradually comprehending the meaning of a variety of new facts which had hitherto been quite unknown to him. During one of the interviews with his wife he declared that while suffering from fever at Devil's Island in 1896 he was kept for two months in chains, and that letters forwarded by him to his counsel were never delivered, while those sent by his family to him were withheld for months.

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