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FIELD AND FARM. 1

I A QUEER CONSULATE.

I S AD END OF A GARRISON DOG.

REINFORCEMENTS FOR SOUTH I…

THE VOLUNTEER REYIEW BY THE…

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I - A NEGLECTED EMPEROR.

-AN AMERICAN WEAKNESS.

THE POSITION IN THE SOUDAN.

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THE POSITION IN THE SOUDAN. According to information up to the middle of May. brought to the military posts on the White Nile andi telegraphed to Cairo, the Khalifa was then still in South Kordofan, not far from Lake Shirkeleh, whence he has been raiding the inhabitants in all directions for food supplies. The Khalifa's camp is about 140 miles west of the nearest point on the White Nile,. and thus about 170 miles from the British post at Duem, which is garrisoned by an Egyptian Battalion and some. Artillery and a Camel Corps. The Khalifa's parties have frequently raided the villages on the- White Nile, and have even ventured within a day's- march of the post at Duem. DIFFICULTIES OF DEFENCE. In fact, the villagers all along the Western bank ot the White Nile between Duem and Kaka, near Fashoda, have no security for life and property, in spite of the fact that gunboats are continually patrol- ling this section of the River. This can easily be ex- plained when it is stated that the White Nile above- Khartoum does not flow in a single channel, but meanders over a wide space of country, and fre- quently in perhaps as many as three or four channels,, so that the extreme banks of the river are frequently eight miles apart. Now that the river is low these. channels flow between mud banks and sudd islands, and it is impossible for a gunboat to see the villages,, which are often some distance inland. In conse- quence of this it is not possible to protect the in- habitants of the Western bank effectually so long a* the Khalifa and his raiding parties are in possession of Kordofan. The inhabitants have in consequence been warned to migrate aeross to the Eastern bank of the White Nile, and the Sirdar's officers have placed boat facilities at their disposal for this purpose. Con- siderable numbers of the population have- thus been transferred to the right bank, but the result has. been by no means satisfactory on account of the lack of food on the Eastern bank. For this reason a great number are still obliged to remain in their old homes, where they, at any rate, have a certain amount of grain buried in the desert in places known only to themselves. TRZ KHALIFA'S FORCES. According to latest advices the Khalifa has with him some 3000 fighting men, but the amount of ammunition in his possession is problematical. Of these men th& detachment under a certain well- known Baggara emir was never in the Battle of Omdurman. This detachment must have been sent away with a view to forming the nucleus of a new force before Omdurman was reached by the Sirdar. Besides this detachment those who escaped from the Battle of Rosaries at Christmas last and made their way across the Blue and White. Niles under the Emir Ahmed Fedil are also with the Khalifa under that chief. It is also quite possible that the dervish force under the Emir Arabi Wad Dafalla, which is known to have evacuated Bor, has joined the Khalifa. The rumours which have appeared in the Press to the effect that some understanding still exists between Menelik and the Khalifa are, according to Reuter's Agency, quite devoid of foundation. The forces thus detailed are believed to be the maximum which the Khalifa has at his disposal. THB BRITISH TROOPS. Meanwhile the troops available at Omdurman and at Duem consist of eight squadrons of cavalry, five batteries of artillery, eight battalions of infantry, and five companies of the Camel Corps-something over 10,000 men. These are, of course, additional to the garrisons left on the Blue Nile, in the Eastern Soudan, and the Fashoda district. Owing to the difficulty of transport a campaign in Southern Kordofan will require very many more camels in proportion to the force engaged than has hitherto been found necessary in operation on the River Nile. Everything will have to be carried from the river bank over a desert country on camel back. It is regarded as inadvisable to start an expedition until the rains are well over. Until then heavily- laden camels would move with great difficulty over the country which was recently so carefully recon- noitred by Colonel Kitchener. The rainy season is usually over at the end of September, so that A move is hardly practicable until Ootober. It is unlikely that any British troops will be employed in this operation. The base of supply will he at some point on the White Nile beyond Duem, from which place the column would strike, carrying its food supplies with it.

|ANTARCTIC EXPLORATION. ----

GARDENING GOSSIP. I

SOMETHING LIKE A RECORD. I

THE RESEARCH STUDENTSHIPS.

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