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OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT.…

NEWS NOTES.

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I HOW COLLIERS WORK.I

I MR. TOM NICKALLS'S WILL.…

; GOLD-SEEKERS' TERRIBLE FATE.…

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THE Q UEEN'S KEYIEW AT ALDEIiSHOT.

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THE Q UEEN'S KEYIEW AT ALDEIiSHOT. A BRILLIANT SPECTACLB. Nothing could ha.ve been more brilliant (says the special correspondent of the Times) than the sur- roundings of the Queen's Review of 1899 on Laffan's Plain. There was on Monday brilliant and even scorching sun, but the wind served to temper the heat agreeably, and from a very early hour in the afternoon the crowds began to gather. Even then the scene was interesting. The hill behind the flag- staff was occupied, every inch of it; carriages and wagons which were to serve for grand stands filled the enclosures, and arrivals came thick and fast. Gradually the troops began to take up their positions on the far side of the green plain. First one cloud of dust and then another rose from the direction of Pyestock. Through and under them one could see the sun sparkling on lancepoints or on cuirasses, and sometimes pennons waving in the breeze. The cavalry were taking up their positions. They were the component parts of the cavalry division which is to take part in the forthcoming manoeuvres on Salisbury Plain, save for one inte- resting body, the squadron of New South Wales Lancers, who time after time were received with the utmost enthusiasm by the assembled spectators. The signs of movement began to be seen far away on the right in the direction of North Camp, and very soon the country in that direction began to assume a distinct resemblance to those-ancieut war pictures which look so terribly wooden. To see troops moving in masses of scarlet, varied with invisible green, which looks quite black, is to realise that the ancient battle painters were not entirely ignorant of their business. So gradually the 14,154 men were to take part in the march past found themselves in position without hitch of any kind, a remarkable achievement when it is remembered that the canal had to be crossed in two passages. And now the interest grew keener. There was first a great gathering of Princes-the Prince of Wales and the Duke of Cambridge in Field Marshal's uniform, the Duke of York in the uniform of the Loyal Suffolk Hussars; the Grand Duke Michael of Russia, and a brilliant group of foreign military attaches, including the French attaché Colonel le Comte du Pontavice de Heussey, the German Baron Luttwitz, the Russian Colonel Yermoloff, and the American Colonel Sumner. Then came the members of the army headquarters staff in great force, with Lord Wolseley at their head, and the Queen's enclosure had begun to look very bright. Lord Lans- downe came too, with Lady Lansdowne, in a carriage which took up a position in the enclosure, and to the left of the saluting base. At this time one could note besides those already mentioned by name: General Sir Evelyn Wood, General Kelly-Kenny, General Sir R. Harrison, Admiral FitzGeorge, Major-General Sir C. F. Clery, Major-General Trotter, Lieutenant- General Sir George White, and in the background a gorgeous Oriental from Afghanistan, and also an appendix not without meaning of Christ's College, Cambridge, and of Gray's-inn. The first gun was heard from the battery placed on Farnborough-common to announce her Majesty's arrival at Farnborough Station, where she had been received by a captain's escort of the 12th Lancers under Captain Loder. Expectation began to develop into excitement. Away on the hill towards the sta- tion a cloud of dust showed where the saluting battery was moving back to take up its position with the rest of the artillery. Then a trumpet sounded; the Royal Standard was hoisted on the flagstaff and streamed out into the sun; Colonel Douglas, A.A.G., appeared at the head of the procession; the escort clattered up; and the troops gave the Royal salute. The Queen, who had left Windsor by special London and South-Western train at 20 minutes past four, had reached Farnborough at five minutes past five. Thence her Majesty had come in a carriage with outriders and postillions and drawn by grey horses. The Duke of Connaught had accompanied her, and with the Queen in the carriage were Prin- cess Christain and the Duchess of Connaught. In a second carriage were Princess Victoria of Schleswig- Holstein, Princess Clementine of Belgium, and the Princesses Margaret and Victoria Patricia of Con- naught. The Queen's Equerries were Colonel the Hon. W. H. P. Carington and Colonel Davidson, and Sir Arthur Bigge was present. And now, when Lord Wolseley had handed a copy of the filed state to the Queen, all was ready, and the march-past began. In this the massed cavalry bands did not, as has been usual heretofore, lead the way, but the procession, and a very gorgeous one it was, began with the Aldershot district staff, headed by General Sir Redvers Buller, V.C., commanding the district. The massed bands of the regiments form- ing the First Cavalry Brigade came next, wheeling to the left to play the brigade past. Major- General J. D. P. French, commandinglhe division, with his staff, followed, preceding Colonel F. J. Eustace, who commanded the three batteries of horse artillery. The batteries marched past to Kars March," the turn out and performance of 0 Battery being exceptionally good. Then followed the Briga- dier of the First Cavalry Brigade, Colonel Brabazon, and staff, the composite regiment of the Household Brigade, the 6th Dragoon Guards, the 7th Dragoon Guards, the 1st (Royal) Dragoons, and a squadron of the New South Wales Lancers. Each regiment marched by by squadrons; the 7th Dragoons kept a splendid line, but their squadrons were very weak. As the New South Wales Lancers marched past to Rule Britannia" they were received with quite an ovation by the spec- tators. Then followed the Second Brigade under Colonel T. C. Porter, consisting of the 10th Hussars, 12th Lancers, and 13th Hussars. The 10th Hussars, being the Prince of Wales's Own, marched past to "God bless the Prince of Wales." The cavalry division was followed by the two brigade divisions of Field Artillery in quarter-column of batteries at half distances, under Colonel H. V. Hunt and Major G. H. McLaughlin respectively. Then came the bridging, pontoon and balloon sections of the Royal Engineers, under Lieutenant-Colonel C. A. Rochfort- Boyd, making an exceptionally smart turn-out. The two divisions of infantry followed in column of double companies, each brigade being headed and played past by its own massed band. Major-General W. O. Barnard commanded the First Division. Lieutenant-Colonel G. L. May, 1st Battalion Lanca- shire Fusiliers, was in command of the First Brigade, which was formed by the 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards, 2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers, 1st Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, 2nd Battalion Scottish Rifles, and 7th Battalion King's Royal Rifles. A dip in the ground just before the saluting base some- what spoiled the alignment for all but the Scottish Rifles, who, with their arms at the trail, showed to distinct advantage. The militia battalion marched past well. The Second Brigade, com- manded by Lieutenant-Colonel Woodland, 1st Bat- talion Durham Light Infantry, consisted of the 2nd Battalion East Surrey Regiment, 2nd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment, 1st Battalion Durham Light Infantry, and the 2nd Battalion Cameron High- landers. The two Siamese Princes marched at the rear of the companies of the Durham Light Infantry to which they are attached. The Camerons made a very creditable show for a battalion so recently raised. Major-General Fitz-Roy Hart led the second Infantry Division past. The Third Brigade, commanded by Major-General Hildyard, consisted of the 2nd and 3rd Batt. Royal West Surrey Regiment, the 1st Batt. Northumberland Fusiliers, the 2nd Batt. Devonshire Regiment, and the 2nd Batt. West Yorkshire Regiment. Extreme interest centered on this brigade, as the Northumberland Fusiliers, though only four companies strong and in serge, represented men fresh from active service. They swung by as if proud of the ribbons on their breasts and the roll of honour on their colours, to which has been added Khartoum." Interest also centred round Colonel Kitchener at the head of the West Yorkshire Regiment. The alignment of the Devonshire Regiment was perhaps best in the brigade. These men were followed by the Fourth Brigade, under Lieutenant-Colonel R. J. F. Banfield. 1st. Batt. Welsh Regiment. This brigade was made up of the 2nd Batt. Somersetshire Light Infantry, 1st Batt. Royal Sussex Regiment, 1st Batt. Welsh Regiment, and 2nd Batt. Royal Highlanders. Both in the march past in column of double companies and in the return in quarter-column perhaps this brigade showed to better advantage, than the other three. The 2nd Somersetshire Light Infantry and the 1st Royal Sussex Regiment marched splendidly, and the bugle band of the former battalion lent particular attraction to the performance. The Weleh Regiment was headed by the regimental goat in scarlet trappings. A company of the Army Service Corps, under Captain A. E. Longden followed the infantry divisions past the saluting base. After the cavalry had marched past they moved to the west end of Laffan's Plain, and the infantry, forming into line of quarter-columns, marched past again by brigades with the Fourth Brigade leading- this was, perhaps, a better performance than the mars h past in column of double companies—and the Fourth Brigade gave another fine exhibition in infantry marching. When the two divisions of infantry were clear, the Horse Artillery, Cavalry Division, and Field Artillery trotted past her Majesty, the Artillery by batteries and the Cavalry by squadrons. The Horse and Field Artillery were excellent, and the 12th Lancers, 1st Dragoons, and 13th Hussars showed out in the Cavalry division. Having trotted past, the Horse Artillery and Cavalry reversed and galloped past. This manoeuvre was splendidly performed by the Artillery, the chestnut battery galloping at their best pace in perfect dressing. The gallop past of the Calvary by squadrons was deplorable, and, with the exception of the 12th Lancers, each squadron seemed to edge off to the left and club. Nevertheless, the pace and dressing of the 12th Lancers was good, and, with thegallopingofthellorse Artillery, wasoneof the fea- tures of the review. After the gallop past, the whole force resumed tts position on the parade ground in the original formation, and then, General Sir Bedvers Buller, with his staff, placing himself ib front of the centre of the line, the whole force advanced in review order to the lige of the saluting base and gave the Eoyal Salute, the massed bands on the ground playing the National Anthem. Then the Queen drove away to Farnborough Station amid great cheering and the nsuai artilWv salute.

I AN IDEAL DRINK. I

IPEERS' OFFICIAL'S DEBTS.I

DUKE OF WESTMINSTER OJS BETTING.

I u _OLDHAM ELECTION. <

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