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The " Daily Mail" and the…

Prolongation of Commercial…

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Collapse of the Cockett Tunnel.

I Chandos-Pole Divorce Case.

I National flank of Wales.…

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" Medical Aid " and " Friendly"…

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Medical Aid and Friendly" Societies. The societies in question may be roughly divided into three classes: The genuine friendly societies, registered under a special Act of Parliament, and giving to their members not only medical attendance, but a weekly payment during illness and a contri- bution towards the expenses of a funeral; the medical aid associations or so-called provident dispensaries," which deal with medical attendance only and the many modern insurance companies, which contract with a doctor for the supply of such attendance to their customers, and throw in his services as a benefit to be obtained along with the policy. It is obvious that, under all three of these forms, it would be possible to make mutually advantageous arrangements; but it has also been shown by experience that all of them are liable to give rise to serious abuses. A doctor who undertakes to attend the members of a friendly society, in return for a payment from each of them of a few shillings a year, rightly thinks that he is rendering them very valuable assistance towards the maintenance of self-respect and independence, and reasonably objects to do for comparatively wealthy people what he is perfectly willing to do for a working man." Bat it h-is happened in many instances that the societies have contained members who were in a position superior to that of a working man at the time of joining, or who had risen into a superior position in course of time. Such members are often of great value to the society itself, bringing shrewdness, knowledge of business, and power of organisation to assist in the management of its affairs but they are well able to pay for medical attendance at ordinary rates, their very prosperity is sometimes conducive to habits less favourable to health than those of the veritable wage-earner, and it is not just that the doctor should find them among the number of his contract patients. Many of these men feel this themselves, and voluntarily relinquish medical benefits; but others cling with tenacity to what they regard as their right, and often think themselves neglected unless they receive more attention in illness than would be either wished for by, or given to, an ordinary member. When the wage-earning member would be willing to attend at the doctor's house, the wealthy member expects to be visited at his own, although a legitimate charge for a single visit would be as much as he pays during the year. Friction arising from this and similar causes has in many places produced lamentable differences between the doctors and the friendly societies. — The Hospital,

Another Public Attempt to…

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-._-__-_.-_-Railway Time Table…

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- Monmouthshire Quarter Sessions.…

The Gleaner. I

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SEVERN AND WYE RAILWAY.