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The Daily Mail" and the Edgar Murder Case.  1 A representative of the Daily Mail called on Mrs. Edgar, at New Brighton, Cheshire, on Friday, and reports the following interview it was an awful shock to me," said Mrs. Eùgar. My husband was killedfright at my feet. Such a big, fine man, too, over 6ft. 2in., and weighing nineteen stoue." And Mrs. Edgar's sad eyes brimmed over. On the night he was killed we had dinner together. After- wards he went out to amuse himself, which he did sometimes in a quiet way, for be was the most sober of men. Between twelve and one o'clock I heard his step coming down the passage. We lived in a place callc-ii 'Flurries- building,' a sort of tenement, so that, of course, there were other people's doors opening into the same passage As he came down the passage I heard a man call out in Dutch, 'En nidtti)a ('What's the talk?') and my husband replied Ikon nidaba' ('I don't know any talk'). The man said some- thing which I did not catch, but I heard my husband say, 'What do you mean by telling me to veetsaak.?' I was not surprised, for it was most insulting. 'Veetsaak' means I clear out,' but it is an expression so low that one would Jiardlj even use it to dogs, The next thing I heard was a cry of I Police,' and my huabaud came into the room and locked the door. He came over to the bed and said, 'Hist! Bessie, they are after me t' The next thing I knew was that a policeman was trying to get in at the window, and that someone was battering at the door. I bad no time to speak to my husband before the door fell in with a crash. A police- man a tall, dark man, stepped inside. My husband did not speak to him, and the police- man did not speak, but the latter had a revolver in his hand, and he just raised it deliberately and shot my husband. He fell in a heap at my feet. I was horribly frightened, and thought he was hurt, and stooped down and asked him if he would have some water. Blood was pouriug out from the region of his heart, and I saw he was dead. Then everything was very confused, but I remember hearing a voice say I Jan (Jones) has shot him,' and that's all I can say." It was said afterwards that your husband was not sober, and that he knocked the other man down," 41 That's quite a mistake. My husband was perfectly sober. The other man was proved to be drunk, and, in fact, he has since drunk him- self to death. He was buried in nearly the next grave to my husband's. The gang the man belonged to were a very low lot, and my husband never spoke to them if he could help it. But the shameful part was afterwards at the trial. I can't remember the name of the judge, but he was quite a young man, only 25. He was smiling and nodding to the people in court as if nothing were the matter, instead of of a trial for murder. Jones, too, was laughing on the doorstep with the other policemen before he came in. Then whenever our lawyer tried to make a point he was told to be silent and ordered to sit down. Everybody was furious, and nobody felt safe, and we were afraid to do much for fear the police would shoot us from cpite and they might have done that for they are the worst scoundrels in the Transvaal. "I was left without a penny, so the South African League got up a Supscription list for me. I know that subscriptions came in from all over the place—fiom Durban, from Salisbury, and from nearly every mine. Those who chiefly got it up were Mr. Dodds and Mr. Webb. I wanted to stay out in Africa, as my health was better there, but all my friends persuaded me to come home, so I came. "The League paid my passage, and said that when I got to England the balance of the sub- scriptions, £120, should be paid me in monthly instalments till I got something to do, as you see I have my little girl to provide for. I was sent to Mr. Hoskirs, in Mincing-lane, London, who gave me £5 to go on with, but I have not had a penny of the other money yet. I only saw by chance the other day in some paper that the balance had been settled on my child. Of course, I am very much upset about the'matter. I should never have come to England if I had thought that I should be stranded here without a penny. At present I am living on my parents, who are old and quite unable to support me. I am sure there must be some mistake some- where." What does the Colonial Office say ?" II Well, I had introductions to one or two members of Parliament, and they were very kind. I wanted to see Mr. Chamberlain, but could not. Sir Edward Grey wrote to say that Mr. Chamberlain had the matter in hand. I do hope something will be done soon. "I know nothing of politics, but I do know the Uitlanders live in terror of the police, and that they want justice, but can't get it." Mr. Chamberlain has since announced, in the House of Commons, that a claim for compensa- tion has been made for Mrs Edgar and her child. i:>

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