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FIELD AND FARM.

IGARDENING GOSSIP. I

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-NERYIE'S LESSON.

NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION".…

THE RED CROSS AT SEA. I

THE MARLBOROUGH GEMS. I

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I THE CATHEDRAL OF NOTRE DAME.

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THE CATHEDRAL OF NOTRE DAME. Although a cathedral, Notre Dame is in one of the smallest parishes of Paris, and has one of the smallest revenues. The emoluments of the Cure of the Cathedral, although he has the title of archpriest do not exceed 12,000f. per annum (remarks Augusta Latouche, in the Paris Magazine). The reason is that within a radius of about 500 yards from the church stand the Hotel-Dieu, a hospital, the barracks of the Cite, the Prefecture of Police, and the Palais de Justice, which together occupy a considerable area. Thus it is that the parish of Notre Dame numbers exactly 4000 inhabitants, while there are others in Paris which number as many as 55,000 souls. While it is exceedingly honorary, therefore, the Cure of Notre Dame is by no means lucrative. For the most part the Archbishop prefers to nominate to the office some fpriest already in possession of private means of his own, or else he places some of the numerous resources of the Archbishopric at the holder's disposal. This will explain why the faithful are rare at the services, except on days of great festivals, when the Cardinal himself officiates. On such days people come from every quarter of Paris. During Lent there are also the celebrated sermons for men in the evenings. To these Lenten sermons roe" come in crowds if the preacher is popular, or if he is a great orator. In the time of the Pere Lacordaire the seats were all occupied two hours in advance. He at once attracted audiences by the breadth of his ideas and the novel turn of his preaching. The sanctaury was invaded by atheists and scoffers, men who went with minds made up to insult the priest, and conspiracies were even formed to prevent him from speaking. But his dignity and assurance disarmed all such plotters, and even those who had come to hiss him had to be begged by him not to applaud. He was succeeded in the pulpit of Notre Dame by the Father de Ravigan, Father Felix, ex-Father Hyacinthe (Loyson), who abandoned Catholicism in 1870 Father Monsabre, Father Ollivier, Monsignor d'HuIst, and to-day by Father Etourneau. Apart from these exceptional services, however, the Cathedral of Paris produces an impression of neglect and abandonment. It is visited only by strangers who come to hear the excellent renderings of plain chant, and by a very small number of parish- ioners, so that at one of the ordinary Sunday services one is disagreeably surprised to find oneself isolated in the immense and almost deserted nave, to which neither the singing nor the tones of the organ, not- withstanding their solemnity, succeed in communicat- ing that warmth and life which is shed around them by souls united in prayer.

EXPEDITION TO MOUNT KENIA.

BOER NAMES FOR THE BRITISH.…

TICKETS TO MATRIMONY. I

ALIEN IMMIGRATION.

BATH'S HISTORIC HOUSES. I

DEAD OR ALI YE—WHICH ?I

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I _THE QUEEN'S LEVEE.7

I _EXPLOSIVES BY POST.

ASCENSION DAY.

FIFTEEN CHILDREN DROWNED.

-BRITISH MUSEUM'S GIFT.

MR. CECIL RHODES, "D. C. L."

GOLD IN A MATTRESS.

THE WRECK OF THE LOCH SLAY.

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