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WILD BEASTS IN THE RHONDDA

-CARDIFF.I

--PRINCE ALBERT VICTOR'S 21st…

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PRINCE ALBERT VICTOR'S 21st BIRTHDAY. I SAISDRINGHAM (WEST FRONT)" I On March 10, the first anniversary of the mar- riage of the Prince and Princess of Wales, their infant son was baptized. The ceremony, at which her Majesty was present, was performed in the private chapel of Buckingham Palace. A it bore but little resemblance to the royal baptisms of former days, some account of the ceremony may be interesting. Besides her Majesty, who was dressed in black silk and crape, thera were present the King of the Belgians, Lord Palmerston, the Duke of Cambridge, Sir George Grey, many of the chief officers of State, and nearly all the foreign Ministers. Among the clergy who officiated at the function were the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dean Stanley, the Bishop of London, and the Bishol) of Oxford. The King of the Belgians and the Princess Helena acj £ d as sponsors. The scene in the chapel was most imposing. The altar was lined with cacjson velvet, panelled with gold lace the ohtffch plate was displayed, and seats of crimson and gold were ranged within the rails for the officiating clergy. The font was a tazza of silver gilt, the rim representing the leaves and flowers of the water lily, the base being grouped with cherubs playing the lyre in front were the Royal arms. The font was placed on a fluted plinth of white and gold. Over the altar was a fine piece of tapestry, representing the baptism of our Saviour. The infant Prince was carried into the chapel by the head nurse, Mrs Clark, being dressed in a robe of Honiton lace, the same that was worn by the Prince of-Wales at his christen- ing, witii a cap of Honiton lace, a cloak of crimson velvet lined with ermine, and a niantle I of white satin edged with Honiton lace. When the Archbishop commenced the prayer, Al- mighty, ever living God," the Countess of Mac- clesneldgave the infant prince to the Queen, who handed him to the Archbishop. On reaching the portion <J_i the service for-the naming of the child the Archbishop demanded of the.sponsors how it should be named, and the Qnesn answered, "Alters Victor Christian Edward." And so ended the ceremony. His early education was received at home, and it was not until March, 1877, that it was resolved that tne two sons of the Prince should receive a portion of their education on board the Britannia training-ship, when they were entered as naval cadets. In May they were examined at the Royal Navy College at Greenwich in the same manner as ordinary naval cadets. Both Princes pas sed a, very satisfactory examination, and in some of the subjects exhibited a more than usual decree of proficiency. Here they re- mained for some time, until on September iSth, 1879, tne two princes embarked on the corvette Baccnante for the Mediterranean. On May 2nd, 1880, the Bat :chante returned from her voyage, in til-3 course of wijieh she had visited the Mediter- ranean, the Wfest Indies, and Bermuda. In their voyage round the world in 1381 and 1832 as inidshipmen in the Bacchante, commanded by Captain Lord Charles Scott, they visited many countries, but a detailed account of the trip has yet to be written. It is- rumoured that some such hook may come I from the Princes themselves, but of this we say nothing. Wherever tha Bacchante touched the greatest loyalty and enthusiasm were shown and the Princes were entertained at balls, routs, dinners, picnics, in everv quarter of the globe. Oa September 4, 1881, thev arrived at the Fiji Island, where they had an opportunity of wit- nessing some of the most curious and striking Island, where they had an opportunity of wit- nessing some of the most curious and striking native ceremonies. On the arrival of the I squadron a, Levulca, thousands of natives came u e in from all the neighbouring islands, and testified their loyalty by giving presents and by per- forming various festive acts of homage. At Levuka, the Princes were the guests of Mr Des Vceux at Government0 House.' At a meeting, the Vuni Valu, in the names of the assembled chiefs and people heartily welcomed the Princes to Fiji, at the same time presenting a magnificent "bbua," which was received and acknowledged with an appropriate expression of thanks by his Royal Highness Prince Albert Victor. The squadron left Fiji on Sep- tember 10th. One of the finest exhibitions was a grand war dance of the natives, in full martial array, illuminated by the clectic light from her Majesty's ship Inconstant. The squadron passed through the inland sea, of Japan, oetween Kobe «nd Yokohama, a route chosen in preference to the direct way to Shanghai, in order to give their Royal Highnesses an opportunity of seeing the scenery. On December 15th the squadron arrived at Amoy. The squadron after a stay of a day or two proceeded to Hong Kong, visiting Ceylon on their way home. In 1883 Prince Edward's name was entered on the books of Trinity College, Cambridge, whither he was conducted on the 18th of Seprember, 1883, tythe Prmce of Wales and the Rev. J. N. L>a;ton, his tutor. Soon after this the Illustrated London News published a page of illustrations representing the Prince going to his rooms, in Seville's Court, with Mr Dalton and the college tutor; his first dining in the college hall, and his attending Divine worship in the College Chapel, when the sermon was preached by the Right Rev. the Bishop of Durham; with a view of the entrance to his rooms under the arcade of Neville's Court; and a portrait of his Royal Highness attired in the nobleman student's cap and gown. Prince Edward also re- sided for a time with Professor Ihne, at Heidel- berg, for the purpose of studying the German language. He has seldom appeared on the public platform. Some two or three weeks ago lie dis- tributed the prizes to the Cambridge Town volun- teers, in the Guild-hall, and spoke of the advan- tages of the system to the individual and the nation. The value of military training, he considered, was exemplified in the most striking way in the case of Germany, and he did not believe the military system of that country weighed nearly so heavily upon her peaceable and mercantile subjects as some would persuade themselves. The steady expansion'iof the German trade and population within the last twenty years was the best proof that the military discipline so far from hindering, on the contrary, aided both individual and national achievement. We are indebted for the above to the Pall Mall Gazette.

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