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TOPICS OF THE DAY.

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TOPICS OF THE DAY. General Campenon's revelations confirm the impression that M. Ferry intends to keep Formosa ulHler any circUtnstances, and to occupy Pekin if China refuses to come to terms. If General Camponon has estimated the situation rightly that is a policy which will cost France a good many millions, whilst playing the Chancellor's game by weakening her at home. Mr Healy was presented on Tuesday by his'Monaghan constituents with a thousand pounds. The amount is a substantial one, considering the poverty of the subscribers, and the presentation is interesting as an ex- tension of the system of payment of Mem- bers. Probably no member of the House of Commons has better claim for payment by his constituents than the Member for Monaghan. The presentation recalls two remarkable incidents in Mr Healy's life. On the day on which he took his seat in Parliament he made hi: maiden speech, and on the day on which lie was called to the Bar he appeared in court with a brief. Pro- bably this never happened before to any Member of Parliament and barrister. The convention at Thurles to-day respect- ing the Nationalist candidate for Tipperary is exciting extraordinary interest in Ireland. The event is regarded as a supreme test of Mr Parnell's power. The Irish leader has against him a strong local candidate and apparently the influence of the priesthood but there have been no indications of decay in Mr Parnell's power in Ireland, and pro- bably he will carry his nominee. The Cape A)-gis has "the best grounds for believing that the real reason why General Joubert resigned his offices in and under the Government of the Transvaal— and to this moment it has never been sug- gested—was that when the ultimatum of the Imperial Government as to Bechuanaland was presented through the High Commis- sioner, it was resolved by the Transvaal Government to make a communication to Berlin, invoking the protection of Germany." Our Colonial contemporary goes on to denounce Lord Derby's refusal to annex the Kalahari Desert, a tract of country some six or seven hundred miles long. It is a cruel thing," says the Arj.us, "that we and our lives and fortunes should be used as counters in a European game with Germany," and much more to the same effect. But if the Kala- hari desert is of such vast importance to tne Cape, why do the colonists refuse to annex it. ? Lord Derby would raise no objection he has, indeed, suggested it. If they de- cline, it is but fair to assume that they are not serious when they say that this desert is necessary to the safety of the Cape Colony. The Vicar of Leamington must be a very fastidious person he has declined to parti- cipate in the week of united prayer because the meetings are held in an unconsecrateu building. The Church of England uses hundreds of unconsecraited buildings all the year round. We suspect that the vicar's real reason was that he objected to take part in such meetings with Nonconformists, only he did not like to say so. Of course, had the meetings being held in a consecrated building, none but clergymen of the Estab- .Y lished Church could have taken part in them. In commenting upon the decision of the Conference with respect to slavery on the West Coast of Africa, Mr Allen says that the Anti-Slavery Society "hails with satis- faction and thankfulness this first step to- wards the deliverance of Africa from the greatest scourge of humanity." Surely not the first step ? We note that the Times endeavours to minimise the importance of the reports on the tenure of dwelling-houses on the Con- tinent by saying that in few of the states from which the reports come are there many large towns. But the reports in question come from every country in Europe, and they show that the terminable leasehold system is hardly known on the Continent, except in a few of the great towns of France, and in a very modified form in a few places in Norway and Sweden. Are there no large towns in Belgium, Holland, Prussia, Aus- tria, Italy ? Yet these countries know no- thing of terminable building leases. The Boundary Commissioners have evidently made a mistake in their division of the Glasgow districts. The Govan dis- trict, mapped out according to the spirit of the Redistribution Bill and the instructions to the commissioners, was accounted a safe Radical seat; but the commissioners propose to graft on to it one of the most Conserva- tive districts of Glasgow, thus infallibly handing the seat over to the Whigs. The lions in Trafalgar-square are, as a rule, not very striking ornaments to the statuary of London. But in the early morning, when the frost rime covers thickly the ground, these particular British lions are in circumstances which will gratify the most ardent Jingo. We note that at the trial of the Kintail petlamb case the counsel for Mr Winans spoke strongly of Mr Mackenzie of Kintail posing as] a patriarchal superior of these people, representing Mr Winans as a tyrant, but at the same time pocketing Mr Winans' rents, while he (of Kintail) refused to fulfil his part of the contract. Mr Winans' counsel, however, forgot to add that when Mr Mackenzie discovered that Mr Winans wished to clear the estate of its inhabitants, he desired to cansel the lease, and is anxious to do so still. Thus there is really no circum- stance to extenuate Mr Winans' behaviour. It was recently stated by the World that the Lotinga case had been settled by com- promise. This, we believe is not so. An application has been made on behalf of the plaintiff to one of the Masters to change the venue to Durham. The application was refused; and an appeal was then made to a K, judge, who dismissed the appeal. Plaintiff has since given notice of her intention to I apply to the divisional court. According to the Italian Times, American millionairesses appear to be particularly partial to Italian noble- men. The recent engagement of Miss EvTa Mackay to Prince Ferdinand Colonna directs attention to a long list of similar alliances, the leading names of which are- Miss Field, Princess Brancaccio; Miss Lorillard Spencer, Princess Vicarara Cenci Miss Broadwood, Princess Ruspoli Miss Conrad, Marchesa Teodoli Miss Kinney, Countess Giannotti; Miss Fisher, Countess Gherardesca; Miss Roberts, Countess Galli Miss Fry, Marchesa Torrdggiani; Miss Lewis, Countcas Barbolini Amadei; Miss Gillinder, Marchesa di San Marzano.

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WILD BEASTS IN THE RHONDDA

-CARDIFF.I

--PRINCE ALBERT VICTOR'S 21st…

_0 -FOREST OF DEAN COLLIERS…

INDUSTRIAL DEPRESSION AND…

THE SAD CASE OF DISTRESS AT…

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FIRE IN A CARDIFF AUCTION…

-...-..-THE RECENT ELOPEMENT…

BURSTING OF A WATER MAIN AT…

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ITHE POLITICAL SITUATION.…

- I-THE CLERICAL SCANDAL IN…

THE PENISTONE RAILWAY I DISASTER.I

CARDIFF GUARDIANS.

RHYMNEY LOCAL BOARD. I

-L THE OPENING OF THE CARDIFF…

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The Nile Expedition. I --__-

-=====■ I THE " TIMES" ON…

NEW RAILWAY IN THE iTRANSVAAL.I

ZULULAND AND THE BOERS. ,…

.._-I THE FRENCH IN CHINA.…

==:=::.-===-THE REVENUE FRAUDS…

THE BISHOP OF LINCOLN.

THE UXBRIDGE MURDER.